If there's supposed to be a SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE, why is our national motto "In God We Trust"?

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    Nov 04, 2011 3:15 PM GMT
    Discuss.
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    Nov 04, 2011 3:25 PM GMT
    (1) Because "It's America! Don't Trust ANYONE That Breathes!" doesn't quite have the same cachet.

    (2) It's a cop-out from otherwise having to explain "E Pluribus Unum" to anybody.

    (3) Hey, it's what our Founding Fathers**** wanted, right?

    ****Founding Fathers' great-great-great-grandchildren from the 1950s, that is...
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    Nov 04, 2011 3:36 PM GMT
    Why associate a control mechanism (God) with a control mechanism (money)?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_God_We_Trust
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    Nov 04, 2011 4:01 PM GMT
    The term separation of church and state is not meant to be so literal. In the colonial period, the colonies wanted to be rid of type of rule in which the church influenced and in effect steered governmental policies. Back then, the church was an immensely rich, powerful and controlling entity, and that is what the founding fathers wanted to avoid. Therefore it was the institution of the church that they wanted to avoid, seeing how self righteous religious zealots could potentially have a horribly adverous affect on our legislature.

    The idea if spirituality was never in question with many of the colonies founded by religious outcasts. So in fact religious tolerance and morally guided decision making was encouraged, thus the term "in god we trust" on our currency.
  • commoncoll

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    Nov 04, 2011 4:31 PM GMT
    appeared around the time of the Civil War or so. The term is called "ceremonial deism."

    People need the hope of God. We need to know that as great as the US is, there is a reason the US is better. After all," out of many, one" are we. Remember, this land was ordained by God Himself. There is more patriotism than religion in this motto.
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    Nov 04, 2011 4:45 PM GMT
    Since Americans are so patriotic, shouldn't their country not suck?
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    Nov 04, 2011 4:59 PM GMT
    because in the 1950s everyone was panicking about the commies. This made politics go insane and as a result they changed the national motto.
  • tazzari

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    Nov 04, 2011 5:20 PM GMT
    Because it makes right-wingers feel good, AND it makes good displacement therapy when congress should be working on debt and unemployment.
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    Nov 04, 2011 5:37 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidbecause in the 1950s everyone was panicking about the commies. This made politics go insane and as a result they changed the national motto.

    That's right; it was about fearing that the godless Commies were coming to get you. It opened a door for branding a particular party as being more "with God" than the other (who's indistinguishable from the Communist party, apparently).
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    Nov 04, 2011 6:07 PM GMT
    "not performing to its potential" was too long?

    (with "does not play well with others" on the obverse. icon_wink.gif
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    Nov 04, 2011 6:18 PM GMT
    Because it is.
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    Nov 04, 2011 6:24 PM GMT
    AMoonHawk said
    Anduru saidSince Americans are so patriotic, shouldn't their country not suck?


    ... and obliviously we suck so bad that people from every fucking country in the world want to come here


    Which is Exactly why I'm leaving to go to Australia... that whole 'There are no Cats in American and the streets are made of Cheese" shit: RAPIDLY losing it's allure.
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    Nov 04, 2011 6:24 PM GMT
    Not that promoting atheism would work anyway since Eastern Europe has already gone through that during much of the 20th century as a result of the socialist movements. People continued to worship whatever in secret only to get persecuted for it when they were caught. Now religious interest has skyrocketed in the region since the establishment of democracy (except in Czech Republic and Estonia apparently).
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    Nov 04, 2011 6:35 PM GMT
    smthjock saidThe term separation of church and state is not meant to be so literal. In the colonial period, the colonies wanted to be rid of type of rule in which the church influenced and in effect steered governmental policies. Back then, the church was an immensely rich, powerful and controlling entity, and that is what the founding fathers wanted to avoid. Therefore it was the institution of the church that they wanted to avoid, seeing how self righteous religious zealots could potentially have a horribly adverous affect on our legislature.

    The idea if spirituality was never in question with many of the colonies founded by religious outcasts. So in fact religious tolerance and morally guided decision making was encouraged, thus the term "in god we trust" on our currency.


    Religious tolerance was not a value for most of the colonials.
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    Nov 04, 2011 6:40 PM GMT
    RedheadedRy said
    smthjock saidThe term separation of church and state is not meant to be so literal. In the colonial period, the colonies wanted to be rid of type of rule in which the church influenced and in effect steered governmental policies. Back then, the church was an immensely rich, powerful and controlling entity, and that is what the founding fathers wanted to avoid. Therefore it was the institution of the church that they wanted to avoid, seeing how self righteous religious zealots could potentially have a horribly adverous affect on our legislature.

    The idea if spirituality was never in question with many of the colonies founded by religious outcasts. So in fact religious tolerance and morally guided decision making was encouraged, thus the term "in god we trust" on our currency.


    Religious tolerance was not a value for most of the colonials.


    LOL especially since many colonials were shipped off to America for being religious rejects of Europe.
  • Gaymer

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    Nov 04, 2011 6:43 PM GMT
    The red scare brought about the addition of "in God we trust". The founding fathers didn't want a theocracy, contrary to many GOP beliefs. And legislators just want to waste time.
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    Nov 04, 2011 6:45 PM GMT
    Court rulings on this state that "church" is a physical organization which is quite different than god as a non physical concept. Our forefathers were not legislating atheism.
  • aiko14

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    Nov 04, 2011 6:51 PM GMT
    GOD is not always equal to CHURCH or vice versa....
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    Nov 04, 2011 6:53 PM GMT
    AMoonHawk said
    Anduru saidSince Americans are so patriotic, shouldn't their country not suck?
    ... and obliviously we suck so bad that people from every fucking country in the world want to come here
    That's because they haven't heard about the awesomeness of Canada. icon_cool.gif
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    Nov 04, 2011 6:57 PM GMT
    Those words appear above the pyramid with an eye on it and reference the illuminati and other such groups that the founding fathers supposedly belonged to.


    And screw all u anti America people. We may have problems, but so does every other country. There are plenty of great people and places here.
  • dancedancekj

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    Nov 04, 2011 7:06 PM GMT
    Copied from my other post in News and Politics:

    "Under God" in the pledge of allegiance was only added in 1954 as well.

    1892- "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

    1923 - "I pledge allegiance to my Flag of the United States and the Republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

    1942 - "I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

    And apparently this only happened in 1954 because Eisenhower had recently been baptized Presbyterian and heard a particularly moving sermon.
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    Nov 04, 2011 7:22 PM GMT
    wolverinecub86 saidThose words appear above the pyramid with an eye on it and reference the illuminati and other such groups that the founding fathers supposedly belonged to.


    And screw all u anti America people. We may have problems, but so does every other country. There are plenty of great people and places here.


    LOL! Religious beliefs (and lack of them) have nothing to do with American patriotism. Personally I have issues with the concept of patriotism in general. However, I can agree that living here isn't so bad compared to many others places in the world. Although many people tend not to know how good they have it until adversity strikes.
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    Nov 04, 2011 7:25 PM GMT
    wolverinecub86 saidAnd screw all u anti America people. We may have problems, but so does every other country. There are plenty of great people and places here.
    Yeah, but Canada is better. icon_cool.gif
  • dancedancekj

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    Nov 04, 2011 7:27 PM GMT
    pocketnico said
    wolverinecub86 saidThose words appear above the pyramid with an eye on it and reference the illuminati and other such groups that the founding fathers supposedly belonged to.


    And screw all u anti America people. We may have problems, but so does every other country. There are plenty of great people and places here.


    LOL! Religious beliefs (and lack of them) have nothing to do with American patriotism. Personally I have issues with the concept of patriotism in general. However, I can agree that living here isn't so bad compared to many others places in the world. Although many people tend not to know how good they have it until adversity strikes.


    +1
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    Nov 04, 2011 7:27 PM GMT
    Anduru saidSince Americans are so patriotic, shouldn't their country not suck?


    Thank goodness I'm not about to be duped into thinking that ALL Canadians are this arrogant.

    I wonder...what do you actually know of this country and where have you actually visited?

    I once had the chance to leave the United States and pursue citizenship in either France or Germany. Granted I don't care for all parts of this country, but when seriously considering the option to leave, I found that I wanted to stay.