Cars and smart keys - don't get taken in

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 2:28 AM GMT
    Received the following and wanted to pass it on......


    How to Lock Your Car and Why

    I locked my car. As I walked away I heard my car door unlock. I went back and locked my car again three times. Each time, as soon as I started to walk away, I would hear it unlock again!! Naturally alarmed, I looked around and there were two guys sitting in a car in the fire lane next to the store. They were obviously watching me intently, and there was no doubt they were somehow involved in this very weird situation . I quickly chucked the errand I was on, jumped in my car and sped away. I went straight t o the police station, told them what had happened, and found out I was part of a new, and very successful, scheme being used to gain entry into cars. Two weeks later, my friend's son had a similar happening....
    While traveling, my friend's son stopped at a roadside rest to use the bathroom. When he came out to his car less than 4-5 minutes later, someone had gotten into his car and stolen his cell phone, laptop computer, GPS navigator, briefcase.....you name it. He called the police and since there were no signs of his car being broken into, the police told him he had been a victim of the latest robbery tactic -- there is a device that robbers are using now to clone your security code when you lock your doors on your car using your key-chain locking device..

    They sit a distance away and watch for their next victim. They know you are going inside of the store, restaurant, or bathroom and that they now have a few minutes to steal and run. The police officer said to manually lock your car door-by hitting the lock button inside the car -- that way if there is someone sitting in a parking lot watching for their next victim, it will not be you.

    When you hit the lock button on your car upon exiting, it does not send the security code, but if you walk away and use the door lock on your key chain, it sends the code through the airwaves where it can be instantly stolen.
    This is very real.

    Be wisely aware of what you just read and please pass this note on. Look how many times we all lock our doors with our remote just to be sure we remembered to lock them -- and bingo, someone has our code...and whatever was in our car.

    Snopes Approved --.Please share with everyone you know
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 3:02 AM GMT
    "Snopes approved"? Yet, no link to snopes article? I couldn't find any reference to this on the site.

    EDIT:
    Looks like an old chain email that was edited for the modern smart keys. The story's wording is pretty much the same.

    http://www.snopes.com/autos/techno/lockcode.asp
    b6PB1.jpg
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Nov 05, 2011 5:03 AM GMT
    My tail gate doesnt lock anymore. Not sure how much I care. I only lock it out of the dreaded inconvenience of having a car stolen and having to get something suitable to drive. Ick....

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 10:25 AM GMT
    xrichx said"Snopes approved"? Yet, no link to snopes article? I couldn't find any reference to this on the site.

    EDIT:
    Looks like an old chain email that was edited for the modern smart keys. The story's wording is pretty much the same.

    http://www.snopes.com/autos/techno/lockcode.asp
    b6PB1.jpg


    See, I knew someone on RJ would be able to point out if this was legit or not! Thanks for the link.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 11:21 AM GMT
    actually you can do that but you have to be closer then "across the street" and you also need the right equipment for each security system, a way of receiving and broadcasting and being able to spoof an encoded key sending signal that'll appear to be the encoded key and each encoded key is actually unique including a new encoded key for the car that you'd buy from the dealer.

    So each key even for the same car is slightly different.

    It's easy to just break in via the damned window or tow the freakin car rather then do that and you'd have less people looking at you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 1:22 PM GMT
    Even more disturbing than someone stealing your 'frequency' to get into your "Buy Here, Pay Here" back-of-the-row special is someone stealing your account information with debit card readers that are wireless....like the one on the gas pump you just filled up at. If not encrypted, then it's fair-game for anyone who wants to steal the info.

    "More technologically advanced skimmers are turning to wireless technology, to intercept signals some gas stations use to transmit card data from the pumps to their central computers. Instead of manually installing the equipment on the pumps, they can lurk in their cars nearby while downloading your card information to a laptop, says Jeff Wakefield, a vice president with VeriFone, the largest secure payment terminal vendor."

    Read more: http://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/gas-station-card-skimmers-1282.php#ixzz1cpx7pSHc


    http://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/gas-station-card-skimmers-1282.php
    http://www.bbbonline.org/idtheft/protect.asp
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 1:44 PM GMT
    All good info. It is worth considering using LifeLock.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 2:11 PM GMT
    socalfitness saidAll good info. It is worth considering using LifeLock.


    LifeLock CEO’s Identity Stolen 13 Times

    http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/05/lifelock-identity-theft/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 6:41 PM GMT
    RFID devices have very low or no power. For smart keys, you'd have to be less than a couple feet away from the person, in order to "grab" the RFID signature from their key fob. For credit cards with RFID chips, you'd have to be a few inches away from their wallet.

    That Snopes link I posted would be true for the old style alarm and keyless entry remotes. But in the early/mid 1990s, car alarm manufactures wised up and employed different techniques to deter code/frequency grabbing.

    As for LifeLock.. it doesn't work. The cheapest and most effective way to prevent ID theft is to call all three credit reporting agencies (in the US) and freeze your credit. This prevents anyone from opening a line of credit under your name/SSN. Also, prevents some forms of credit inquiries. So if you are legitimately applying for a new credit card, or auto loan, or renting an apartment/house where a credit check is required, you'll have to remove the freeze temporarily
  • bmoney1

    Posts: 244

    Nov 05, 2011 6:51 PM GMT
    I can't lock my doors with the button in my car.. I won't lock the door that is open no matter what to prevent you from locking your keys in the car.. And it won't set my alarm unless my key fob is used.. fml. Plus I don't even have a metal key, so it's not like I can lock my doors that way either. Good think I live in a small city where this is unlikely to happen.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2011 9:15 PM GMT
    xrichx saidRFID devices have very low or no power. For smart keys, you'd have to be less than a couple feet away from the person, in order to "grab" the RFID signature from their key fob. For credit cards with RFID chips, you'd have to be a few inches away from their wallet.

    That Snopes link I posted would be true for the old style alarm and keyless entry remotes. But in the early/mid 1990s, car alarm manufactures wised up and employed different techniques to deter code/frequency grabbing.

    As for LifeLock.. it doesn't work. The cheapest and most effective way to prevent ID theft is to call all three credit reporting agencies (in the US) and freeze your credit. This prevents anyone from opening a line of credit under your name/SSN. Also, prevents some forms of credit inquiries. So if you are legitimately applying for a new credit card, or auto loan, or renting an apartment/house where a credit check is required, you'll have to remove the freeze temporarily


    Maybe the OP's car is older from the 90's