Favourite cookbook?

  • ytOwen

    Posts: 298

    Nov 06, 2011 8:38 AM GMT
    The Joy of Cooking?
    The New York Times Cook Book?
    Jamie Oliver?
    The Silver Spoon?
    May be something out of the way and completely unusual?

    My favourite is a 1960's edition of the Larousse Gastronomique.
    Not because of it's 8,500 recipes, but because of the hilariously
    arrogant tone in which it's written. I often dip into it just for a laugh.

    You?
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    Nov 06, 2011 8:41 AM GMT
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    Nov 06, 2011 12:35 PM GMT
    I go through cookbooks like I got through [crushes on] men.

    Several hundred here and that's after some serious culling.

    Recent flirtations with:

    Cucina Fresca by Kleiman and LaPlace
    Simple Pleasures by Portale
    Urban Italian by Carmellini
    Sunday Suppers at Lucques by Goin
    The Canal House series by Hamilton and Hirsheimer
    Washoku by Andoh

    That early Larousse is great, though. Yes, it's arrogant, but the more recent editions are so mechanical and generic that they don't have much character.
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    Nov 06, 2011 1:37 PM GMT
    I actually read cookbooks at night before I go to bed. I have some 300 at this point. Some of my favorites in no particular order:

    Hugh Fearnley's River Cottage Meat cookbook
    Chapter 1 opens with his Meat Manifesto and moral justification for eating non factory farmed meat.
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    James Petersen's Sauces. A must have for anyone wishing to understand the art of sauce making.

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    Kellers' Ad Hoc. Much more aproachable then The French Laundry or Bouchon cookbooks.
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    Sarah Scott's The Wild Table. Incredibly unique (and written by a personal friend)
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    Nov 06, 2011 1:38 PM GMT
    www.google.com
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    Nov 06, 2011 1:42 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidwww.google.com


    So true icon_biggrin.gif

    ( happy Sunday Mr. Flex)
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    Nov 06, 2011 2:16 PM GMT
    I have a bookshelf full of cookbooks. The one I use more than any other is:

    The America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook


    Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Childs, Louisette Bertholle, and Simone Beck is also a pleasure to use.
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    Nov 06, 2011 2:29 PM GMT
    I love this thread. I actually love cooking and collecting cookbooks.

    The one I actually use the most is my Mom's old Betty Crocker cookbook from the 1960's. The cover is worn off and it's in horrible shape, but it has been well used.

    I also have a Taste of Home baking cookbook that I use a lot around the holidays.

    And while people seem to hate her, I actually did learn some simple useful recipes from Rachel Ray.
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    Nov 06, 2011 2:31 PM GMT
    Since I cook from scratch, I use the "Farm and Home Cookbook and Housekeeper's Assistant" published in 1907. The one I have was given to my grandmother by my great-grandmother when my grandparents married. It was falling apart when I got it, but I have copied recipes. Lately, I found a free copy online and saved the pdf to my computer.

    It covers everything you could want to know from butchering to cooking from scratch.
  • kencarson

    Posts: 224

    Nov 06, 2011 3:05 PM GMT
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    Nov 06, 2011 3:14 PM GMT
    ^^^^THIS
    *drool* Don't care about the recipes. Just give me entertaining prose.

    I have way too many cookbooks. But, if you must have just one, Cook's Illustrated would be ideal along with Shirley Corriher's two books(Cookwise and Bakewise).. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shirley_Corriher
    I believe you want more than just a recipe. You want a discussion of what can go wrong if you don't follow the directions and why. She's a biochemist.


    Also, keep a journal if you tackle anything complex. Nothing sucks like making the same mistake twice and company shows up.
  • bishop65

    Posts: 226

    Nov 06, 2011 3:15 PM GMT
    Joy of Cooking. Hands Down. And Nigella Bites.
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    Nov 06, 2011 3:35 PM GMT
    my partial list in no particular order:

    Grand Diplome Cooking Course (20 volume set)
    from the Cordon Bleu, London
    ABC of French Food, Deighton, Len
    not just a cookbook, but a pithy account of travels in France, it's ppl, and
    foods.
    The Fabulous Egg Cookbook, Feinman, Jeremy
    answers pretty much any question concerning eggs.
    The Meat Cookbook, Roberson, John and Marie
    even shows how to butcher. includes a section on game.
    The Foods and Wines of Spain, Casas, Penelope
    more of an introduction to the foods and wines of Spain for the novice.
    The Jewish Festival Cookbook, Engle, Fannie and Certrude Blair
    international Jewish cooking. the lebkuchen recipe is excellent.
    A Taste of Lebanon: Cooking Today the Lebanese Way, Salloum, Mary
    who doesn't need to know 21 yogurt dishes?
    The Book of Tofu: Food for Mankind, Shurtleef, William and Akiko Aoyagi
    includes how to make your own tofu.

    and my fave:

    In Nonna's Kitchen: Recipes and Traditions from Italy's Grandmothers,
    Field, Carol. stories that make me feel Italiano.
  • SomeSiciliano...

    Posts: 543

    Nov 06, 2011 3:37 PM GMT


    eatingwell.com


    I have a few cookbooks from my late grandmother, circa 1930s and 40s era. Talk about some icon_eek.gif recipes ,,,, makes Paul Dean look like a vegan.
  • Huxley7

    Posts: 57

    Nov 06, 2011 4:19 PM GMT
    1,800 Recipes:

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    Nov 06, 2011 4:28 PM GMT
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    http://www.amazon.ca/MENNONITE-TREASURY-RECIPES-Mennonite-Treasury/dp/B000M6BCKY
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Nov 06, 2011 4:29 PM GMT
    I own all of Ina Garten's cookbooks and refer to them often. This one has many of the recipes I make over and over. It's a must for every home chef:

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  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Nov 06, 2011 4:34 PM GMT
    favorite cockbook... hmm... that's a hard one
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    Nov 06, 2011 4:38 PM GMT
    The internet, der.
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    Nov 06, 2011 4:57 PM GMT
    A New Way to Cook by Sally Schneider. I like it because it gives you a recipe and then some different ways to mix it up. It encourages experimentation.
  • hoo4u

    Posts: 119

    Nov 06, 2011 5:20 PM GMT
    Joy of Cooking
    any/all Best of by America's Test Kitchen/Cooks Illustrated
    Fannie Farmer Cookbook
  • aznmtl

    Posts: 137

    Nov 06, 2011 5:57 PM GMT
    Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child - not the easiest recipes to make and take a LOT of time but the results are amazing!
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    Nov 06, 2011 6:09 PM GMT
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  • ytOwen

    Posts: 298

    Nov 07, 2011 6:07 AM GMT
    One of my favourite bits of the Larousse Gastronomique is the entry on eggs.

    On one hand it suggests that the best eggs are fresh free range eggs, and that eggs that are more that two days old should not be used when baking cakes.

    On the other it suggests that one way of preserving eggs is to store them in petroleum jelly.
  • BCSwimmer

    Posts: 209

    Nov 07, 2011 6:16 AM GMT
    As a vegetarian this is one of my favourites:

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laurel's_Kitchen