Honey Cures Almost Everything

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    Nov 09, 2011 4:45 AM GMT
    Its been said by the Egyptians, by the Jews, by the Indians, by the Arabs, by the Chinese.. pretty much everyone... they even dropped it into people's eyes!!!! Crazy much?? Could it just be placebo? Well this article down here tells me I can stop putting industrial biting alcohols and peroxidases on my wounds.. it seems honey works much better!!! And it does a plethora of other things icon_smile.gif

    http://itotd.com/articles/218/honey-as-medicine/

    Honey as Medicine
    Sweet relief

    245

    When I get a sore throat, I always find a cup of tea with some honey very soothing. But thanks to my proper Western scientific conditioning, I always assumed that the restorative power of honey was mostly in my head. Sure, it tastes good and has a pleasant texture that coats my irritated throat, but it’s practically pure sugar, after all. What good could it possibly do me other than diminishing my perception of discomfort for a few minutes? So I’ve been content in my belief that honey is little more than a tasty placebo. Now, ironically enough, my convictions are being challenged, as researchers are turning up new evidence of honey’s medical benefits left and right.

    Historically, honey has been used as a folk remedy in cultures around the world for millennia. It has been prescribed informally as a cure for smallpox, baldness, eye diseases, and indigestion. It’s even been used as a contraceptive. As with most natural “cures” unsupported by scientific studies, I sort of chuckle and sigh when I read about things like this—honey may be a silly substitute for real medicine, but at least it’s not bloodletting. However, in this case, the bees may have the last laugh. It turns out that honey’s properties make it a surprisingly effective cure-all. Or, let’s say, cure-much.


    Bee Fruitful and Multiply
    Honey’s salutary effects stem primarily from its antimicrobial properties. Most bacteria and other microorganisms cannot grow or reproduce in honey. I found this quite surprising, because all things being equal, bacteria love sugar. Honey contains around 40% fructose and 30% glucose—among other sugars—making it seemingly a great treat for microbes. However, honey is also somewhat acidic, and acids prevent the growth of some bacteria. More importantly, honey does not provide the water and oxygen needed to support bacterial growth. Although honey contains a fair amount of water, it’s supersaturated with sugar—meaning the water is not available to the microorganisms.

    So what happens when you dilute honey with water—the bacteria just multiply like crazy, right? Well…yes and no. Amazingly enough, diluted honey supports the growth of bacteria that are helpful to humans while killing off dangerous strains. Some microorganisms do indeed flourish in a dilute solution of honey—such as the yeast used to ferment it into mead. Also, certain types of beneficial bacteria that live in the human intestines and aid digestion do well in a mixture of honey and water. But honey also contains a substance called glucose oxidase. When combined with water and oxygen, glucose oxidase forms gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide—the very same stuff you probably have in your medicine cabinet right now. This means that diluted honey can serve as an excellent antiseptic, while being far less likely than ordinary hydrogen peroxide to harm already-damaged tissue.

    Show Me the Honey
    What does all this mean in practical terms? For one thing, it means that honey applied topically to a wound can promote healing just as well as, or in many cases better than, conventional ointments and dressings. Its antibacterial properties prevent infection. It also functions as an anti-inflammatory agent, reducing both swelling and pain. As if that weren’t enough, it even reduces scarring. In studies around the world, honey has been shown to be extraordinarily effective in the treatment of wounds, burns, and surgical incisions. Honey also functions as a moisturizer, making it a useful treatment for sunburn as well as a general-purpose skin softener.


    But wait, there’s more! Honey is truly a head-to-toe cure. Honey has been shown to be effective in treating inflammation of the eyelid, some types of conjunctivitis, and keratitis (along with other forms of corneal damage). It can also, believe it or not, be used to treat athlete’s foot and other fungal infections.

    A Spoonful of Sugar Is the Medicine
    Lest you think that honey is only healthy if used on the outside of the body, it can help with a great many internal problems too. Thanks to its antimicrobial action, it not only soothes sore throats but can also kill the bacteria that sometimes cause them. Although research is inconclusive so far, there’s also the suggestion it could actually reduce tooth decay—all that sticky sugar notwithstanding. Moving down the esophagus and through the digestive tract, honey can help to heal ulcers and upset stomachs. It has also been proven to regulate intestinal function, alleviating both constipation and diarrhea. (In a similarly syzygial way, honey can be used both as a sleep aid and to increase alertness.) Honey also contains a variety of antioxidants, which may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer.

    Manuka honey, made from the flowers of the Manuka bush (Leptospermum scoparium), comes from New Zealand. Some varieties of Manuka honey contain an antibacterial component called UMF (Unique Manuka Factor), which has been found to be even more useful than ordinary honey in combating infections. Intriguingly, honey with UMF is even effective against many so-called “superbugs”—strains of bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus that are resistant to multiple types of antibiotics. An Australian company called Medihoney has obtained the blessing of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (comparable to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration) to sell this type of honey packaged as a dressing for wounds. The company also sells honey and honey-based products designed to treat digestive problems, oral irritations and sore throats, and even skin conditions such as psoriasis.

    The Color of Honey
    Now that you’ve worked yourself into a gleeful frenzy over the miraculous properties of honey, I want to temper your enthusiasm a bit. The bad news, if you can call it that, is that not all honey is created equal. The chemical composition of honey depends on a huge number of variables, the most important of which is the type or types of plant that provided the source nectar. Honeys vary not only in color and flavor, but in their medicinal properties, with some varieties being much more potent than others. Because it’s impossible to regulate the comings and goings of millions of bees, there’s also no way to guarantee that honey from any location will be chemically the same from year to year or free of contamination from pollutants the bees may have found their way into. Honey supplies must be tested thoroughly and regularly.



    I should mention one other caveat: never feed honey to a child under one year of age. Honey sometimes contains Clostridium botulinum spores. Although they’re inactive in the honey itself, once inside a digestive tract they can multiply and cause a potentially fatal disease of the nervous system called infant botulism. By the time of a child’s first birthday, there are usually enough beneficial bacteria in the digestive tract to make it an inhospitable environment for Clostridium botulinum, meaning that honey can be eaten safely.

    As I was reflecting on all the health benefits of honey, it suddenly occurred to me: I don’t think I’ve ever seen a sick bee. Coincidence? Probably. But honey may be one miracle cure that lives up to the buzz.
  • Delivis

    Posts: 2332

    Nov 11, 2011 12:13 AM GMT
    Beware the promises of panaceas.
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    Nov 11, 2011 12:20 AM GMT
    you forgot to mention that it can be fun in the bedroom, not that I would know anything about that ;-)
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    Nov 11, 2011 12:29 AM GMT
    GreenHopper saidAs I was reflecting on all the health benefits of honey, it suddenly occurred to me: I don’t think I’ve ever seen a sick bee. Coincidence? Probably. But honey may be one miracle cure that lives up to the buzz.


    Ah, ha ha ha. That's so funny. Yes, we've never heard of the global colony collapse thing going on.
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    Nov 11, 2011 12:41 AM GMT
    I always buy pots of honey, and use it as a face wash and occasional light hair product.

    After putting honey on my face for a while, then washing it off: my skin immediate feels and looks much smoother than it's already smooth and soft texture, my skin looks warmer/brighter in tone, any pre-pimples are quickly drawn out/dissapear, and any marks on the skin fade pretty damn quicker than if one had not used honey at all.

    Honey-Face-Mask.jpg
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    Nov 11, 2011 12:42 AM GMT
    How exactly does one use honey as a moisturizer? Sounds like a sticky situation.
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    Nov 11, 2011 12:43 AM GMT
    I do put about 4 tablespoon in my afterworkout shake though. Something to deliver the creatine... Or something like that.
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    Nov 11, 2011 1:02 AM GMT
    I've had personal experience with the faster healing of a deep burn with honey. I also regularly use Medihoney in wound care at work It's amazing to read all of the research done on the benefits of honey in wound care and as an antimicrobial.
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    Nov 11, 2011 1:03 AM GMT
    The clincher for RJ: honey to boost athletic performance (yes, Im surprised myself lol)

    http://www.nutraingredients.com/Research/Boost-athletic-performance-with-honey
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    Nov 11, 2011 1:04 AM GMT
    Ravco saidI do put about 4 tablespoon in my afterworkout shake though. Something to deliver the creatine... Or something like that.


    According to what I just read.. its more effective at keeping your blood sugar at an even rate after you ingest it.. thus not giving you a "sugar rush" but allowing the body to use it all more efficiently
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    Nov 11, 2011 1:24 AM GMT
    GreenHopperIts been said by the...Jews


    ORLY

    Some Jewish people have a custom of dipping apples into honey on Rosh HaShanah but I know of no Jewish authorities of note that have said "honey cures almost everything" and there are MANY Jewish doctors.

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    Nov 11, 2011 1:35 AM GMT
    GrowAPair said
    GreenHopperIts been said by the...Jews


    ORLY

    Some Jewish people have a custom of dipping apples into honey on Rosh HaShanah but I know of no Jewish authorities of note that have said "honey cures almost everything" and there are MANY Jewish doctors.



    Ehm...

    Proverbs 16:24 Pleasant words are as an honeycomb, sweet to the soul, and health to the bones.
    Proverbs 24:13 My son, eat thou honey, because it is good; and the honeycomb, which is sweet to thy taste:

    But no seriously dude.. what WAS that??? Those are quotes from the Hebrew bible.... it says honey = health...

    Dont start me on the bullshit of arguing every little word in my article.. thats a waste of your time... I wont bother with you.. make like your name and grow a pair and stop bitching or acting like a whiny cunt
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    Nov 11, 2011 2:01 AM GMT
    honey was also used to embalm the dead. an odd practice was the "melified man" his body became embalmed by the constant eating of honey until he died...his preserved flesh was said to be curative.he voluntarily underwent the honey diet,and sacrificed himself for the healing of others. strange little factoid.
  • Bowyn_Aerrow

    Posts: 357

    Nov 11, 2011 4:55 AM GMT
    Hmm.

    The truth is that many bacteria are antibiotic resistant due to the use of so many poorly by patients and doctors over the past few generations. As such honey is no longer as great an antibacterial as it once was. And its 'wonders' are becoming less as newer, stronger, more nasty versions of bacteria are coming to their own.

    The fact that people died a lot more from simple infection (with or without honey) should be indicator enough as to its overall effectiveness as 'medicine'. Yes it has some wonderful treatment options, just temper that with the fact that modern disease is nastier, meaner, tougher and more deadly than in generations past. Our bad.

    What the article fails to tell you is that RAW honey is the true source of all of those medical wonders. Most honey sold on store shelves has been partially cooked, losing a lot of its 'medicinal' properties. Again, our bad for taking a wholesome, good thing and killing it.

    And as for sick bees. Bees do, indeed get sick. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diseases_of_the_honey_bee

  • okologische

    Posts: 471

    Nov 11, 2011 5:01 AM GMT
    hahaha watching vanishing of the bees!!!! great doc!
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    Nov 11, 2011 5:07 AM GMT
    mickeytopogigio said
    GreenHopper saidAs I was reflecting on all the health benefits of honey, it suddenly occurred to me: I don’t think I’ve ever seen a sick bee. Coincidence? Probably. But honey may be one miracle cure that lives up to the buzz.


    Ah, ha ha ha. That's so funny. Yes, we've never heard of the global colony collapse thing going on.


    I know, right?
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    Nov 11, 2011 5:20 AM GMT
    mickeytopogigio said
    GreenHopper saidAs I was reflecting on all the health benefits of honey, it suddenly occurred to me: I don’t think I’ve ever seen a sick bee. Coincidence? Probably. But honey may be one miracle cure that lives up to the buzz.

    Ah, ha ha ha. That's so funny. Yes, we've never heard of the global colony collapse thing going on.

    Oh, you infidels are all alike.
    That's not due to some disease but because they have incurred God's wrath!
  • Thirdbeach

    Posts: 1364

    Nov 11, 2011 5:29 AM GMT
    Can Honey cure the Summertime blues?
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    Nov 11, 2011 5:55 AM GMT
    Ravco saidHow exactly does one use honey as a moisturizer? Sounds like a sticky situation.


    Thentix_Group.jpg

    Very very good stuff. I have a jar of it on my sink.
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    Nov 11, 2011 5:58 AM GMT
    Bullwinklemoos said
    Ravco saidHow exactly does one use honey as a moisturizer? Sounds like a sticky situation.


    Thentix_Group.jpg

    Very very good stuff. I have a jar of it on my sink.


    I don't wanna know what you use it for big guy icon_confused.gificon_wink.gif
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    Nov 11, 2011 6:10 AM GMT
    CHIdude said
    Bullwinklemoos said
    Ravco saidHow exactly does one use honey as a moisturizer? Sounds like a sticky situation.


    Thentix_Group.jpg

    Very very good stuff. I have a jar of it on my sink.


    I don't wanna know what you use it for big guy icon_confused.gificon_wink.gif


    My face?
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    Nov 11, 2011 6:31 AM GMT
    Yet another one of these moronic honey threads.

    Honey is sugar, wax, and a random collection of phytochemicals. Almost all of them are unknown, some are extremely toxic. What's in there depends on where the bees were at the time. Sometimes it's literally aspirin, sometimes it's literally poison ivy, sometimes it's digitalis. It's a bit like walking into a pharmacy and taking random pills. Or like fucking bareback. Most of the time, it's just sugar.

    And BTW, bees get extremely high doses of antibiotics. They get shipped from state to state, following the pollination season. They pick up all kinds of diseases and parasites. If they don't get pumped full of drugs, they die. The lucky ones get a few months to rest each year. The unlucky ones just get cycled until the hive dies.

    BTW: My beekeeper "vacations" his bees in my woods. Full of poison oak. He sells his honey as magic "allergy desensitizer." If I eat it more than once a week or so, I get the symptoms of thrush. icon_eek.gif No, it's not AIDS, it's just honey.
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    Nov 11, 2011 3:25 PM GMT
    GreenHopper said
    GrowAPair said
    GreenHopperIts been said by the...Jews


    ORLY

    Some Jewish people have a custom of dipping apples into honey on Rosh HaShanah but I know of no Jewish authorities of note that have said "honey cures almost everything" and there are MANY Jewish doctors.



    Ehm...

    Proverbs 16:24 Pleasant words are as an honeycomb, sweet to the soul, and health to the bones.
    Proverbs 24:13 My son, eat thou honey, because it is good; and the honeycomb, which is sweet to thy taste:

    But no seriously dude.. what WAS that??? Those are quotes from the Hebrew bible.... it says honey = health...

    Dont start me on the bullshit of arguing every little word in my article.. thats a waste of your time... I wont bother with you.. make like your name and grow a pair and stop bitching or acting like a whiny cunt


    SRSLY
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    Nov 11, 2011 3:26 PM GMT
    Honey heals. You need to know where you source it from. I buy mine from small farmers and when I travel, I get local honey because it helps with allergies and helps build my immune system to local irritants.
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    Nov 11, 2011 6:34 PM GMT
    Pouncer said
    jpBITCHva said
    GrowAPair saidSome Jewish people have a custom of dipping apples into honey on Rosh HaShanah but I know of no Jewish authorities of note that have said "honey cures almost everything."

    No, you've got this all wrong.

    It's not apples, it's matzohs. And we don't dip them in honey, we bake them with the blood of freshly-slaughtered Christian infants.

    Oh God, even a topic about honey can't save us the obligatory dose of Jewish self-pity.

    Or, much more tragically, the obligatory dose of Jew-hatred from RJ's most infamous Anti-Semite.
    [Note here - again - his obsession not with Israel/Zionism, but with Jews.]