I hereby rename this website: Geekjock

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 10:18 AM GMT
    Yes, it's true.

    Guys who like Maths (with an s)

    Guys who "dig" computer games

    Guys who enjoy camping (not the Kenneth Williams-type)

    Guys who love Christina Aguilera and not Britney

    Guys who watch (and enjoy) Star Trek (it could never happen unlike Star Wars which happens far far away)

    Yes, they're all here on Geekjock.com
  • metalxracr

    Posts: 761

    May 31, 2008 10:50 AM GMT
    Here in the US we just call it Math!
    It has an s added most every where else, but the concepts of it all is completely universal, despite the language or culture in any part of the world. icon_biggrin.gif
    It's fascinating!


    btw.. i love Xtina AND Britney!
  • metalxracr

    Posts: 761

    May 31, 2008 10:57 AM GMT
    Oh, I forgot to point out that you can't noun.

    You said, "Guys who computer games". You need to throw in a verb in there buddy!!icon_evil.gif

    No, I'm just joshin' I figured I'd play up the nerdy bit! lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 11:01 AM GMT
    Hey Jinj....don't forget the RealJoke chapter of this site! icon_wink.gif
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    May 31, 2008 11:44 AM GMT
    And don't forget Red.... this site is full of "cheeky, cheeky boys"....

    LOL


    icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 12:05 PM GMT
    redheadguyYes, it's true.

    Guys who like Maths (with an s)

    Guys who computer games

    Guys who enjoy camping (not the Kenneth Williams-type)

    Guys who love Christina Aguilera and not Britney

    Guys who watch (and enjoy) Star Trek (it could never happen unlike Star Wars which happens far far away)

    Yes, they're all here on Geekjock.com


    I hate math.

    I think I don't [insert unspecified verb here] computer games.

    I enjoy camping but haven't done it in years.

    I dislike both Xtina and Britney's songs equally.

    I prefer Star Wars over Star Trek.

    Oh crap.. I still don't belong. icon_cry.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 4:06 PM GMT
    You belong in my heart sedative.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 4:20 PM GMT
    I just submitted my homework for my online calculus class I'm taking this summer, and got a 57%

    If the MATH SKILLZ are so prevalent on this site, anybody wanna help me graduate college?


    Just to be clear, not by cheating, I'm asking if anyone'd be willing to actually tell me what the hell a derivimative is, and why I should care.icon_redface.gif
    ...if I pass because of one of you, I'm listing RJ as my best academic resource when it comes to the end-of-course critiques...
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    May 31, 2008 4:26 PM GMT
    I embrace my geekiness.
  • Puppy80

    Posts: 451

    May 31, 2008 4:27 PM GMT
    I'm with you Red, I'm all about Star Trek over Star Wars
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 4:39 PM GMT
    zimster saidHey Jinj....don't forget the RealJoke chapter of this site! icon_wink.gif


    Let me clarify...there is RealJoke (haha) and RealJoke ( icon_rolleyes.gif )

    humorous pictures
  • DiverScience

    Posts: 1426

    May 31, 2008 4:41 PM GMT
    novembermike saidI just submitted my homework for my online calculus class I'm taking this summer, and got a 57%

    If the MATH SKILLZ are so prevalent on this site, anybody wanna help me graduate college?


    Just to be clear, not by cheating, I'm asking if anyone'd be willing to actually tell me what the hell a derivimative is, and why I should care.icon_redface.gif
    ...if I pass because of one of you, I'm listing RJ as my best academic resource when it comes to the end-of-course critiques...



    Think of it as a rate of change. So, for example, the velocity of your car *at that moment* (or at least an equation by which to calculate said instantaneous velocity.

    Geometrically, it's the straight line that closest approximates the actual function at a given point, or the tangent to the curve at that point.

    You care if you're doing anything with rates which are not linear.

    Imagine you're pushing on the gas pedal of your car. At the beginning, you get a lot of torque and thus a lot of acceleration. As you reach higher speeds, you have to push down more to get the same acceleration. That is, the acceleration you get from a certain amount of depression is not constant. Graphed, it would be a curve. The derivative of that function will tell you at any given point along that curve what will happen when you push down on the accelerator.
  • NickoftheNort...

    Posts: 1416

    May 31, 2008 4:43 PM GMT
    Without geekdom, there wouldn't have been a site anyways (or much of an Internet or even common use of computer).

    Math is fun...unless you have a bad teacher.

    Computer games can be entertaining and a replacement for novels...though Dig Dug is lacking the plot department.

    Camping...either or.

    Britney and Christina...meh. Give me some video / computer game OSTs (though "Break the Ice" and "Beautiful" have music videos I enjoy).

    Star Trek, particularly the animated series, is generally more entertaining than Lucas' "grand" journey; ST provides something other than Campbell soup.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 4:48 PM GMT
    and I cherish my geek-ee-ness and will fight to protect it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 5:00 PM GMT
    Kitteh Geeks...

    funny pictures


    i can fiz thiz sorta


    i'll fix it


    start


    cat...which I hope is my house...YUM!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 5:15 PM GMT
    Lol - so funny! Rofl!

    It's so true, for me at least...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 5:33 PM GMT
    344152cpvpjws1a9.gif
    glitter-graphics.com

    Star Trek Rocks
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 6:21 PM GMT
    cat
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 6:28 PM GMT
    redheadguy saidYes, it's true.

    Guys who like Maths (with an s)

    Guys who "dig" computer games

    Guys who enjoy camping (not the Kenneth Williams-type)

    Guys who love Christina Aguilera and not Britney

    Guys who watch (and enjoy) Star Trek (it could never happen unlike Star Wars which happens far far away)

    Yes, they're all here on Geekjock.com
    Omg I am in trouble...gay and geek...eeek.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 6:28 PM GMT
    Can we add Doctor Who to the list...hehe..icon_lol.gif
  • vindog

    Posts: 1440

    May 31, 2008 7:04 PM GMT
    Star Wars > Battlestar Galactica > Star Trek: Next Generation > Star Trek original
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 31, 2008 7:31 PM GMT
    I can't do math without writing it down.

    I 'love' video games. Hit lvl 25 with PoM last night in AoC.

    Fishing + camping = uber

    Uh, Fail. I like punk music.

    ST:TNG is the best. DS9 wasn't bad, but was a knock off of BAB5.

    I watched cartoons this morning and had a cheeseburger for lunch. Ah, gotta love life. icon_razz.gif
  • metalxracr

    Posts: 761

    May 31, 2008 9:22 PM GMT
    novembermike saidI just submitted my homework for my online calculus class I'm taking this summer, and got a 57%

    If the MATH SKILLZ are so prevalent on this site, anybody wanna help me graduate college?


    Just to be clear, not by cheating, I'm asking if anyone'd be willing to actually tell me what the hell a derivimative is, and why I should care.icon_redface.gif
    ...if I pass because of one of you, I'm listing RJ as my best academic resource when it comes to the end-of-course critiques...


    Here is the best watered down short to the point answer I can think of.

    A derivative is basically "slope" or the rate of change. usually you're trying to find what the rate of change is at an instantaneous point on a slope using a tangent where X approaches zero. Basically what that means, is you're getting two functions on a line so close to the tangent as accurate as possible as you can, so you can have a more accurate answer. That's basically what limits and derivatives are.

    Derivatives can help solve rate of distribution, growth, and velocity. and other things.

    Anti-derivatives aka integrals are cool too! They are just the undoing of Derivatives and they can be used to find areas under curves! The neat thing about that is?..
    Well... get your equation setup, slap a 2pi infront of that shit and it'll rotate it on it's axis and you'll get the volume of that particular shape!

    You can't use regular geometry to find areas of most things! WxBxH only goes so far! icon_wink.gif
  • metalxracr

    Posts: 761

    May 31, 2008 9:27 PM GMT
    caslon saidKitteh Geeks...

    funny pictures


    HAHAHAHA the Hexi-Decimal codes for White grey and black!
    amazing! Who ever thought of that is a real nerd!!!
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    May 31, 2008 11:16 PM GMT
    Because derivatives are the rate of change, they can be really useful in trying to find out when something is in balance. That is, when the rate of something moving out of a system is equal to the rate of something flowing in, the net change in the system is zero. So, if you can express each of those two rates in a formula, you can take the derivative, set it equal to zero, and solve for when the system is in equilibrium.

    Going in the opposite direction, there are all sorts of weird things you can do with the opposite of the derivative, the integral. For instance, you can use an integral to determine the volume of any object which is formed by rotating around a central axis. Sure, we all memorized the formulae for determining the volume of a sphere, a cube, a pyramid back in geometry. But this way you can find the volumes of more obscure shapes: a football, a flying saucer, an intricately-carved bannister.

    And, of course, if you want to do any advanced physics, chemistry, most applied engineering, and even a good amount of biology, you'll need to know some calculus.