If you accept this, shut the fuck up about your freedom.

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    Nov 13, 2011 1:41 PM GMT
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    Nov 13, 2011 4:15 PM GMT
    If someone was trying to bury me alive in a barrel could it help the FBI find me in time?
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    Nov 13, 2011 4:21 PM GMT
    But it will come in handy when the aliens take over the planet and they've captured you and have you siliconed into their birthing chamber and some army dude is trying to find you so he can rescue you......on wait, that was Aliens 3....never mind icon_eek.gif

    On a serious note, you can make that commercial look as pretty as you'd like, but that dog don't hunt....
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    Nov 13, 2011 6:14 PM GMT
    Freedom? Whats that?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/13/business/face-recognition-moves-from-sci-fi-to-social-media.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=tha26
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    Nov 13, 2011 6:16 PM GMT
    dekiruman saidIf someone was trying to bury me alive in a barrel could it help the FBI find me in time?


    ...no...no, i do not think so...
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    Nov 13, 2011 6:23 PM GMT
    Slowly but surely it's going to become the norm. Thankfully I'll probably be dead by then. Along a similar vein.
    I do think that it's quite likely that in my lifetime we're going to have to have mandated GPS locators/black boxes required in every vehicle which is another step towards the OP.
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    Nov 13, 2011 6:28 PM GMT
    And now for some graphics for your trolling pleasure.

    666+rfid+chipII.jpg

    [img]http://www.tldm.org/news4/MarkOfTheBeastBarcode.jpg[/img

    ]Mark666.jpg

    mondex12.gif

    Mark_of_the_beast_XES.jpg

    wmb4.jpg

    mark_of_the_beast.jpg

    oh-noes-everybody-panic.gif?w=289&h=240
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    Nov 13, 2011 6:31 PM GMT
    beneful1 saidSlowly but surely it's going to become the norm. Thankfully I'll probably be dead by then. Along a similar vein.
    I do think that it's quite likely that in my lifetime we're going to have to have mandated GPS locators/black boxes required in every vehicle which is another step towards the OP.


    The day somebody tries to put a blackbox in my Roadster is the day i change my nationality.
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    Nov 13, 2011 6:31 PM GMT
    If FaceBook has its way, privacy short of locking yourself in a Farraday Cage inside of a lead closet will be a thing of the past.

    As will be freedom from being watched 24/7/365 by Big Brother.
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    Nov 13, 2011 6:39 PM GMT
    alphatrigger saidIf FaceBook has its way, privacy short of locking yourself in a Farraday Cage inside of a lead closet will be a thing of the past.

    As will be freedom from being watched 24/7/365 by Big Brother.


    Freedom? Ha!!!! What's that???

    Orwell got it wrong. He thought it would be the big bad government putting the public under the microscope when in fact the public is more than willing to give it all away. You're right about Facebook (and every other site that requires you to register and "share" information, including this one). But we do it voluntarily.

    I'm not in the least bit worried about government Big Brother. The government is too inept. But we're clearly already living in the world of corporate Big Brother and we're more than happy to trade our freedom and privacy for "convenience" many times a day, from swiping our credit cards to sharing on Facebook.

    And in response to the OP, I couldn't agree more! For most people in this country, though, "freedom" is a marketing term. They have no idea what it really means, nor do they appreciate the many small ways in which we continue to sacrifice freedom for convenience. Trouble is, once you give something up, you rarely get it back.
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    Nov 13, 2011 6:43 PM GMT
    They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety

    Ben said it best.
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    Nov 13, 2011 6:45 PM GMT
    RoadsterRacer87 said
    beneful1 saidSlowly but surely it's going to become the norm. Thankfully I'll probably be dead by then. Along a similar vein.
    I do think that it's quite likely that in my lifetime we're going to have to have mandated GPS locators/black boxes required in every vehicle which is another step towards the OP.


    The day somebody tries to put a blackbox in my Roadster is the day i change my nationality.


    RESISTANCE IS FUTILE.

    211207781_0bamaBorg_42982848462_xlarge.j

    YOU WILL BE ASSIMILATED.
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    Nov 13, 2011 6:45 PM GMT
    tahoebackpacker said
    And in response to the OP, I couldn't agree more! For most people in this country, though, "freedom" is a marketing term. They have no idea what it really means, nor do they appreciate the many small ways in which we continue to sacrifice freedom for convenience. Trouble is, once you give something up, you rarely get it back.


    This is near the heart of the problem with the american use of the word freedom (which is most frequently done by right wing politicians)
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    Nov 13, 2011 6:47 PM GMT
    Lostboy said
    tahoebackpacker said
    And in response to the OP, I couldn't agree more! For most people in this country, though, "freedom" is a marketing term. They have no idea what it really means, nor do they appreciate the many small ways in which we continue to sacrifice freedom for convenience. Trouble is, once you give something up, you rarely get it back.


    This is near the heart of the problem with the american use of the word freedom (which is most frequently done by right wing politicians)


    IRONY:

    We were more free under King George III in 1775 than we are today under corporate- and union- owned politicians.

    The King was just a man with a few token lackeys.

    The Big Government (owned in part by corps, the other part by Big Labour) is a million-headed hydra that will be nigh impossible to be rid of.
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    Nov 13, 2011 7:41 PM GMT
    OP, in the end, this is no different than being referenced by your social security number or the magnetic strip on your drivers license that makes them more difficult to fake.

    This application is for making sure they prevent drug mistakes on an unconscious patient and makes me less motivated to memorize all the names of prescrips I take for the next time I wake up in a hospital.

    The ONLY information they will get from the RFID is a hexadecimal identity number that is unique. This is exactly the same as a pet ID tag. They use this number and their secure account to log into a web server that then provides them with relevant medical data.

    It doesn't work any other way.

    A passive tag that small has to operate at 2.45gHz which has a maximum range under ideal circumstances of 3 meters or slightly over 100 inches, never mind the only way to get that kind of range is to hit it with a magnet of significant size that will obliterate any credit cards you are carrying. Which is why the commercial features a handheld reader aimed directly at the person's left wrist.


    If you are a criminal or a terrorist, this is too easily thwarted by carrying a duplicate tag module with a different serial number. Two transmitters at the same time will garble the data.
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    Nov 13, 2011 8:33 PM GMT
    RobertF64 saidOP, in the end, this is no different than being referenced by your social security number or the magnetic strip on your drivers license that makes them more difficult to fake.

    This application is for making sure they prevent drug mistakes on an unconscious patient and makes me less motivated to memorize all the names of prescrips I take for the next time I wake up in a hospital.

    The ONLY information they will get from the RFID is a hexadecimal identity number that is unique. This is exactly the same as a pet ID tag. They use this number and their secure account to log into a web server that then provides them with relevant medical data.

    It doesn't work any other way.

    A passive tag that small has to operate at 2.45gHz which has a maximum range under ideal circumstances of 3 meters or slightly over 100 inches, never mind the only way to get that kind of range is to hit it with a magnet of significant size that will obliterate any credit cards you are carrying. Which is why the commercial features a handheld reader aimed directly at the person's left wrist.


    If you are a criminal or a terrorist, this is too easily thwarted by carrying a duplicate tag module with a different serial number. Two transmitters at the same time will garble the data.
    Wow man, you have obviously been brainwashed.

    Personally, I will kill myself before accepting a lack-of-freedom chip.
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    Nov 13, 2011 8:36 PM GMT
    Hmm... I reset Safari - cleared all cookies, etc., - and restarted my computer. Yet I'm still getting served banner ads for things that I looked at yesterday. Argh. There is no escape.
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    Nov 13, 2011 9:00 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    .
    Wow man, you have obviously been brainwashed.

    Personally, I will kill myself before accepting a lack-of-freedom chip.

    A future visit to the hospital, planned or not, could very well grant you that wish.

    Anyone who has a pet with a microchip (if it isn't chipped, you must not care about your pet) can go to the vets office, borrow their reader device, and you can demonstrate for yourself how not fun these things are to read.

    In the end, you guys are using scare tactics to discourage others from a simple, safe, and effective way to make sure vital medical data is conveyed to doctors and I think that's reprehensible.

    To avoid the signal being absorbed by your body then blocked by walls, trees, and rain, the antenna on that device will need to be about six inches in length, the frequency will need to be lowered so it will interfere with cell networks, and the device will need a battery that is recharged at regular intervals........



    Except... You have one of those already.
    It's usually called....whatchmacallit... oh yeah. a cellphone.
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    Nov 13, 2011 9:05 PM GMT
    RobertF64 said
    paulflexes said
    .
    Wow man, you have obviously been brainwashed.

    Personally, I will kill myself before accepting a lack-of-freedom chip.


    In the end, you guys are using scare tactics to discourage others from a simple, safe, and effective way to make sure vital medical data is conveyed to doctors and I think that's reprehensible.


    Until the "secure" web site is hacked and everyone's medical data is compromised. Slippery slope.

    Ultimately, we have no choice. This is the future. We will be assigned numbers and each occupy a row in a database somewhere. It will be sold to us under the guise of security and safety (you're already drinking that Kool Aid), but make no mistake, it means the absolute end of privacy and a complete redefining of the word "freedom".
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    Nov 13, 2011 9:14 PM GMT
    What's the name of that website where you can see the location information that Apple saves from iphones?
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    Nov 13, 2011 9:15 PM GMT
    RobertF64 said...blah blah blah...

    (small print)
    Except... You have one of those already.
    It's usually called....whatchmacallit... oh yeah. a cellphone.
    I still use an old cellphone that allows you to disable the tracking feature; and it's a prepaid phone so it contains no personal info.
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    Nov 13, 2011 9:18 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    RobertF64 said...blah blah blah...

    (small print)
    Except... You have one of those already.
    It's usually called....whatchmacallit... oh yeah. a cellphone.
    I still use an old cellphone that allows you to disable the tracking feature; and it's a prepaid phone so it contains no personal info.

    Doesn't matter. All cellular networks are multi-sectored and can locate a user by triangulation and time of arrival.

    AT&T developed this to try to fulfill the E-911 mandate about 8 years ago.
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    Nov 13, 2011 9:19 PM GMT
    We've given it up already! MY google phone locates me 24 hours a day, shows who I spend time with (because 75% of all people have Google / Android phones), shows what I search for and look at on the net, HAS MY WHOLE MEDICAL HISTORY BECAUSE BLUE CROSS AND MY DOCTOR E-MAIL ME, shows everything I buy because American Express emails me, etc. The Gestapo couldn't ask for more.
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    Nov 13, 2011 9:20 PM GMT
    pre_mortem saidWhat's the name of that website where you can see the location information that Apple saves from iphones?

    ITYM the location information that requires your iTunes login and password AND causes the handset to notify whoever has it in their position that the location was requested?

    http://www.me.com

    And, *yawn*.
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    Nov 13, 2011 9:22 PM GMT
    RobertF64 said
    pre_mortem saidWhat's the name of that website where you can see the location information that Apple saves from iphones?

    ITYM the location information that requires your iTunes login and password AND causes the handset to notify whoever has it in their position that the location was requested?

    http://www.me.com

    And, *yawn*.


    Nope.