Eating after a workout

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    Jun 02, 2008 2:43 PM GMT
    My personal trainer advises me to eat protein within the first hour after working out. He said that it is during this time that the body is scavenging around to find protein to rebuild the muscles from the workout.

    He also says protein in liquid form is better because then the body doesnt have to divert blood to the gut to digest solid protein.

    Also he advises that this is the time to eat carbohydrate if you are going to have any during the day. The body will burn it immediately rather than store it.
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    Jun 02, 2008 8:50 PM GMT
    Yep, my trainer tells me the same thing, and he tells me to put a little bit of sugar in the protein shake as well.
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    Jun 02, 2008 8:52 PM GMT
    I usually avoid carbs after a workout caue I want my fat to burn. However, my cblood sugar drops so low I feel sick and need to eat them. I guess listen to your body... and your trainer

  • Jun 02, 2008 8:55 PM GMT
    I read in Men's Health that having 2% milk is good protein for your body after a work out. I also have a protein shake after my workout from time to time. You may also want to eat something really small before you workout, like I have an apple with peanut butter for some energy. Keeps me going a little bit longer.
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    Jun 02, 2008 9:14 PM GMT
    Yeah, I do the same thing. I just bought gold standard whey protein because it is low in carbs and this shit is nasty.
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    Jun 04, 2008 3:22 PM GMT
    The best protein I have found is Nitrean by At large nutrition... It is tasty and no clumps too !
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    Jun 04, 2008 3:56 PM GMT
    Where I teach group fitness, we promote what we call "The Window of Opportunity". This is the 15 to 45 minutes where the muscles are open to refueling. Some articles suggest an hour others a few hours after a workout. Check out the following url.

    http://sportsmedicine.about.com/cs/nutrition/a/aa081403.htm
  • atxclimber

    Posts: 480

    Jun 05, 2008 3:44 AM GMT
    muchmore: Do your glycogen stores only replenish immediately after their use? I assume if you eat carbs at some later time, your body will rebuild the glycogen with the glucose preferentially before storing it as fat, no? So is it important to have it immediately after working out?

    A friend linked me an article from bodybuilding.com (I think, can't find it now) that said consuming protein post-workout without carbs showed the same levels of protein synthesis within the body as protein with carbs, and that not eating carbs after a workout leaves the body to refuel itself by burning fat reserves instead.

    I've always had some carbs after a workout, but after reading that I figured, what the hell, I'm trying to lose maybe 6 more pounds of fat, I'll stop and see how it goes.

    And while I'm definitely a bit more lethargic through the day, that's to be expected from calorie restriction in general, but I don't ever crash or feel too woozy or anything, my energy level is pretty stable.

    But I do wonder if I'm leaving gains on the table by not eating carbs right after working out. The research seems mixed.
  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    Jun 05, 2008 9:30 PM GMT
    I just came across this article from the NY Times about this subject. Very interesting.

    Real Thought for Food for Long Workouts

    Here is a small sample of what's in it:

    "Here is what is known about proteins, carbohydrates and performance.

    During exercise, muscles stop the biochemical reactions used to maintain themselves such as replacing and resynthesizing the proteins needed for day to day activities. It’s not that exercise is damaging your muscles; it’s that they halt the maintenance process until exercise is over.

    To do this maintenance, muscles must make protein, and to do so they need to absorb amino acids, the constituent parts of proteins, from the blood. Just after exercise, perhaps for a period no longer than a couple of hours, the protein-building processes of muscle cells are especially receptive to amino acids. That means that if you consume protein, your muscles will use it to quickly replenish proteins that were not made during exercise.

    But muscles don’t need much protein, researchers say. Twenty grams is as much as a 176-pound man’s muscles can take. Women, who are smaller and have smaller muscles even compared to their body sizes, need less.

    Dr. Rennie said that 10 to 15 grams of protein is probably adequate for any adult. And you don’t need a special drink or energy bar to get it. One egg has 6 grams of protein. Two ounces of chicken has more than 12 grams.

    Muscles also need to replenish glycogen, their fuel supply, after a long exercise session — two hours of running, for example. For that they need carbohydrates. Muscle cells are especially efficient in absorbing carbohydrates from the blood just after exercise.

    Once again, muscles don’t need much; about one gram of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight is plenty, Dr. Tarnopolsky said. He weighs 70 kilograms, or 154 pounds, which means he would need 70 grams of carbohydrates, or say, 27 ounces of fruit juice, he said."

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    Jun 05, 2008 9:45 PM GMT
    Caslon4000 saidMy personal trainer advises me to eat protein within the first hour after working out. He said that it is during this time that the body is scavenging around to find protein to rebuild the muscles from the workout.

    He also says protein in liquid form is better because then the body doesnt have to divert blood to the gut to digest solid protein.

    Also he advises that this is the time to eat carbohydrate if you are going to have any during the day. The body will burn it immediately rather than store it.



    yeah...your trainer is not exactly correct about the bolded part. Your body still needs to break those polymers into monomers so they can be absorbed into the blood stream.

    Once food reaches the small intestine it is absorbed by cells known as enterocytes (abosorptive cells...which line the lumen of the SI). Pancreatic enzymes are recruited to the SI (actually the duodenum to be specific) and break down the food into basic units (i.e. amino acids, monosaccharides, etc...) These basic units are then shuttled to the opposite end of the enterocytes where they meet the blood stream

    unless you are taking purely broken down amino acids, the above process occurs
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    Jun 05, 2008 10:04 PM GMT
    My weight routine tends to happen later at night. I try not to eat carbs after six pm. And after my workout I eat chicken. I've read that since meat takes longer to digest it keeps your body from attacking your muscles during the night.

    But everything always seems to contradict itself. And I guess it depends on what your ultimate goals are.