Summer reading

  • chuckles

    Posts: 19

    Jun 02, 2008 8:53 PM GMT
    Hopefully there isn't a thread about this yet. I was wondering if you guys have any recommendations for some summer reading.

    I will admit that I don't read that much during the winter, but during the summer there is nothing I love more than being on the beach with a good book. So share any books that you have read, or are going to read, that you highly recommend. I like all different genres.

    The first book I'm going to read this summer is "The Confederacy of Dunces."

    Can't wait to hear what you guys recommend.
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    Jun 02, 2008 9:01 PM GMT
    I read a lot of gay fiction in the past 15 months. A few books I really liked:

    "Leaving Myself Behind" by Bart Yates;
    "The Home at The End Of the World" by Michael Cunningham;
    "Send Me" by Patrick Ryan;
    "Dream Boy" by Jim Grimsley
    "Bleeding Hearts" by Josh Aterovis;

    A few non-gay fiction I have liked in recent years include, "The Life of Pi" by Yann Martel, "The Emperor's Children" by Claire Messud, "Family Matters" by Rohinton Mistry.

    I must admit I rarely read "page turners" like Stephen King or John Grisham, I will let other RJ members comment on mainstream authors.
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    Jun 02, 2008 9:10 PM GMT
    I recommended this book already on another thread

    The Post-American World, by Fareed Zakaria

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/194960/
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    Jun 02, 2008 11:14 PM GMT
    I'm planning on reading Choke by Chuck Palahniuk (same guy that wrote Fight Club.). I read Invisible Monsters and loved it. He's kind of like a more hardcore Kurt Vonnegut.
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    Jun 02, 2008 11:15 PM GMT
    Caslon4000 saidI recommended this book already on another thread

    The Post-American World, by Fareed Zakaria


    I just started reading this one last night. I didn't want to stop. Very good reading.

    Another favorite summer read of mine - a book I've read multiple times - is Written on the Body by Jeanette Winterson.
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    Jun 02, 2008 11:27 PM GMT
    The Prince of Frogtown by Rick Bragg. One of the best Southern writers ever.
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    Jun 02, 2008 11:45 PM GMT
    My summer reading:

    Fiction: Clan of the Cave Bear (has cool anthropological aspects)

    Non-Fiction: The Omnivore's Dilemma (you'll learn things about our food that you never knew)
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    Jun 02, 2008 11:47 PM GMT
    XRuggerATX said
    Non-Fiction: The Omnivore's Dilemma (you'll learn things about our food that you never knew)


    I am waiting on this one and his other book. I hope they do not disappoint.
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    Jun 02, 2008 11:51 PM GMT
    RunintheCity said[quote][cite]XRuggerATX said[/cite]
    Non-Fiction: The Omnivore's Dilemma (you'll learn things about our food that you never knew)


    I am waiting on this one and his other book. I hope they do not disappoint.[/quote]

    The Botany of Desire is more light and entertaining. A fun read for nonfiction.
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    Jun 02, 2008 11:58 PM GMT
    I read the whole series of "Clan of the Cave Bear" when i was kid. haha, it was like porn when i was kid.

    I am currently reading the third book in the series of Odd Thomas by Dean Kootz. One the best characters in fictions IMHO.

  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Jun 03, 2008 12:09 AM GMT
    I read that whole series, too. I remember the line, "the sacred mound between her thighs." What a euphemism!

    I'm reading Mississippi Sissy by Kevin Sessums. Really interesting autobiography about a young gay boy growing up in Mississippi.
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    Jun 03, 2008 12:19 AM GMT
    I have a couple...I most are politically, crime or money based shockingly enough haha...

    -Naked Republicans
    -Relentless Pursuit
    -Exposed
    -From the sandbox to the corner office - lessons learned on the way to the top

    etc...
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    Jun 03, 2008 12:36 AM GMT
    I'm just about finished reading "How I Paid for College" by Marc Acito. It's quite entertaining. "Blind Fall" by Christopher Rice is next. I recommend anything by Tom Robbins, especially his earlier novels. I love Virginia Wolff, too, although it can take a few pages to get into the rhythm of her writing.
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    Jun 03, 2008 12:55 AM GMT
    The Fountainhead - Ayn Rand
    Atlas Shrugged - Ayn Rand
    Harry Potter Series - JK Rowling

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    Jun 03, 2008 1:35 AM GMT
    Killing Rommel - Steven Pressfield

    - A look at a guy who you might call the last honorable warrior.
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    Jun 03, 2008 3:21 AM GMT
    "Omnivore's Dilemma" is a fantastic book, one of my favorites. I'm currently also reading:

    Rushdie's "Enchantress of Florence"
    DeLillo's "Underworld"
    "Alice Waters & Chez Panisse"
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    Jun 03, 2008 4:07 AM GMT
    I'm on book four of the Earth Chronicles by Zecharia Sitchin. Check 'em out.
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    Jun 03, 2008 4:25 AM GMT
    I'll be reading some Don Miguel Ruiz, Earnest Holmes, Rumi and Hafiz. I'm also re-reading the Laurell K. Hamilton's Anita Blake series, starting Jaqueline Carey's Kushiel's Scion and maybe some Star Trek novels if David Mack or Keith R.A. De Candido put out something new. I might pick up Caslon's recommendation of The Post-American World, but then again, I tend to avoid reality when at all possible.icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jun 03, 2008 4:47 AM GMT
    Um, I have to read about a book a day for school (so I've read quite a bit for someone my age).

    Hands down, the best gay lit book I've ever read (and trust me, they're hard pressed to find) is called A Visitation of Spirits

    It's out of print now, but if you can find it, it will make your heart stop.

    I promise.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jun 03, 2008 5:22 AM GMT
    [quote][cite]XRuggerATX said[/cite]My summer reading:

    Fiction: Clan of the Cave Bear (has cool anthropological aspects)

    Ha Darryl Hannah's best movie because she doesn't utter a word!!!!!!!!!!
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    Jun 03, 2008 9:09 AM GMT

    GLBT Fiction

    The Forgotten Ones - Douglas Ferguson

    Boy meets Boy by David Levithan

    Talk - Kathe Koja

    The straight road to Kylie - Nico Medina


    GLBT Non-ficiton

    Queering Teen Culture- Jeffery P. Dennis

    Chasing Adonis: Gay Men and the pursuit of perfection - Tim Berling

    The Kid - Dan Savage



    Fantasy

    Brightly burning - Mercedes Lackey

    The Magic Circle Quartet - Tamora Pierce

    Hero - Perry Moore (this one is about a gay Superhero)( he also directed the narnia movies)


    Fiction

    Ghostwritten - David Mitchell

    Executive Orders - Tom Clancy

    Link to Alexandria - Steve Berry


    Non-fiction

    Dispatched form the Global Village - Derek Evans

    Unmarketable - Anne Moore

    Change the World - Bornstein


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    Jun 03, 2008 12:06 PM GMT
    XRuggerATX saidMy summer reading:

    Fiction: Clan of the Cave Bear (has cool anthropological aspects)


    Oh my god, I can't believe someone mentioned Jean Auel! LOL

    You might also like the other books in the Earth's Children series. I've read The Clan of The Cave Bear, The Valley of the Horses, The Mammoth Hunters, and The Plains of Passage.

    I still haven't read The Shelters of Stone though.

    And yeah, it's very well researched, a fascinating tour of prehistoric culture, though packaged as a romance. Certain theories though like how the myth of centaurs originated, the disappearance of the Neanderthals (called 'Flatheads' in the books), taming of certain animals, the start of industries like the atlatl (spear-thrower), flint 'firestones', dyeing, boats, etc.

    n8dagrtI read the whole series of "Clan of the Cave Bear" when i was kid. haha, it was like porn when i was kid.


    Haha. Yeah. Jondalar was like... porn perfection! icon_lol.gif




    My suggestion for the OP:

    The Descent by Jeff Long

    n10835.jpg

    A really fascinating fictional work that tries to explain the origin of demons in human mythology. Very very disturbing and creepily probable.

    My favorite thing on it was the depiction of Satan/God as the mind-transferring (possession) original soul. The oldest soul who started the first civilization (and it wasn't of humans). I won't spoil it. LOL Fave scene was the discovery of a female 'demoness' who survived by eating the life-supported bodies of elderly patients in the basement of a corrupt institution (a la Coma).

    Here's the official summary:

    In Tibet, while guiding trekkers to a holy mountain, Ike Crockett discovers a bottomless cave. When his lover disappears, Ike pursues her into the depths of the earth. . . . In a leper colony bordering the Kalahari Desert, a nun and linguist named Ali von Schade unearths evidence of a proto-human species and a deity called Older-than-Old. . . . In Bosnia, Major Elias Branch crash-lands his gunship near a mass grave and is swarmed by pale cannibals terrified of light. . . .

    So begins mankind's realization that the underworld is a vast geological labyrinth riddling the continents and seabeds, one inhabited by brutish creatures who resemble the devils and gargoyles of legend. With all of Hell's precious resources and territories to be won, a global race ensues. Nations, armies, religions, and industries rush to colonize and exploit the subterranean frontier.

    A scientific expedition is launched westward to explore beneath the Pacific Ocean floor, both to catalog the riches there and to learn how life could develop in the sunless abyss. Is there a natural explanation, as the scientists hope? Or is there a true supernatural basis? Are the "demons" part of our evolutionary family tree? Is their enigmatic leader merely a freak genius, or could he be the legendary Satan?

    Fathom by fathom, Ike guides the expedition -- and Ali -- deeper into the deadly stone wilderness. In the dark underground, as humanity falls away from them, the scientists and mercenaries find themselves prey not only to the savage creatures, but to their own treachery, mutiny, and greed. Meanwhile, on the surface, a band of aged scholars scours archaeological digs, museums, artifacts, and rare texts for clues to Satan's existence. Is he lurking in wait for the expedition, or is he roaming the earth? Or is he dead? One thing is certain: miles inside the earth, evil is very much alive.


    I hope I can grab his new book Deeper, its sequel soon.