I NEED TO TRY TO PUT ON AT LEAST 20 LBS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Adavid

    Posts: 19

    Nov 18, 2011 6:49 PM GMT
    Rite now I weigh near 175lbs I have the stock frame already broad ribs and wide shoulders naturally. What I really want to do tho is gain another twenty pounds by May of next year. My work out routine previously consisted of running near 3.5 miles in about 40 min, followed by 12 sets of 10 reverse crunches. Then on a bench laying flat locking my feet under the feet i would do 4 sets of 15 oblique crunches with a 20 lbs. weight. 4 sets of 15 lawn mower pulls with 20 lbs. shoulder shrugs 4 sets of 15 20 lbs weight and 4 sets of 20 of concentration curls with 20 lbs.finishing of with a 2 minute plank. I need advice to develop a new routine. My schedule was 3 on 1 off 2 on 2 off then repeat.
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    Nov 18, 2011 9:01 PM GMT
    I would recommend more exclamation points.
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    Nov 18, 2011 9:13 PM GMT
    You have to watch It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia.
    Mac gained more than 20lbs.

    Do what he did.
  • He_Man

    Posts: 906

    Nov 18, 2011 9:33 PM GMT
    You seem to be doing everything contrary to gaining weight. First, What is your diet like, which is the most important aspect of gaining weight, followed by rest and then your training program.

    You need to eat (clean) as much as possible. Eat, eat and eat some more. Your body requires excess calories in order to add muscle mass. Of course, keep your protein up, carbs moderate and fat low to moderate, which depends on what your aiming for (i.e., clean bulk or fast, dirty bulk). I can't stress eating enough. I used to have people ask me all of the time about gaining weight, and when I asked them what they ate, they would always tell me how little they ate. I hate that! Just eat, damn it! LOL

    Second, you need to rest in order to allow your muscles to recover. A lot of people go into weight training thinking that they can train seven days a week without ever letting their bodies rest. You break down muscle tissue in the gym, but you GROW outside the gym -- that is, if you get the right amount of nutrients and REST!

    Third, the training program. Your training program is what a person would do if they wanted to LOSE weight, not gain weight. Your reps are way to high. I mean doing 15 reps of 4 sets is what you would do when you want to get ripped up, toned or lose weight. If you want to gain weight, you need to first gain strength and then up your weights that you lift, which means lowering your rep range. To add strength, you need to stick to 5 to 10 reps at a weight that you can do no more than 10 reps. If you are doing 5 reps of a weight, then you should not even be able to push the sixth one even if you wanted to. It must be to failure!!!

    If you want hypertrophy (muscle building), then you can do 8 to 12 reps, again to failure. Key point to remember, though, is that it's all about concentration. You must have excellent form, slow movements and focus only on the muscle, not on all of the hot guys walking around. Feel the brain/muscle connection. With every rep, you must feel every muscle twitching and working, so concentrate on what you are doing, using good form. If your form breaks, then lose the ego and lower the weights.

    Oh, don't over do it on the cardio. Cardio is great for cardiovascular health and allows you to maintain strenuous workouts, but doing too much cardio can be detrimental to your gains. If you're a hardgainer, then I wouldn't do more than two or three days of cardio a week, and those should not be done on the days you are training. If you are not a hardgainer, then you can do more, but keep track of your weight, and if you notice you're not gaining enough weight, then back off of the cardio.

    So, basically, eat more, train right, rest, and ease up on the cardio.
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    Nov 18, 2011 9:38 PM GMT
    Squat. Bench Press. Deadlift. Lots of milk and eggs.

    http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/FAQ:The_Program#Three_Flavors_of_Starting_Strength
  • Latenight30

    Posts: 1525

    Nov 18, 2011 10:03 PM GMT
    yeah the running-STOP IT!
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    Nov 18, 2011 10:18 PM GMT
    Most of the battle is in the kitchen. Eat big, lift big, get big. Do some research, find what your natural metabolism is (chances are you're probably supposed to be naturally fat like me) and then figure out how many calories you need and how many grams of protein you need (I'd recommend somewhere between 0.8 grams of protein per kilo bodyweight and 2 grams per pound bodyweight, but preferably towards the latter because you want to bulk) and then lift.
  • Adavid

    Posts: 19

    Nov 18, 2011 10:26 PM GMT
    CuddleBuddy saidYou seem to be doing everything contrary to gaining weight. First, What is your diet like, which is the most important aspect of gaining weight, followed by rest and then your training program.

    You need to eat (clean) as much as possible. Eat, eat and eat some more. Your body requires excess calories in order to add muscle mass. Of course, keep your protein up, carbs moderate and fat low to moderate, which depends on what your aiming for (i.e., clean bulk or fast, dirty bulk). I can't stress eating enough. I used to have people ask me all of the time about gaining weight, and when I asked them what they ate, they would always tell me how little they ate. I hate that! Just eat, damn it! LOL

    Second, you need to rest in order to allow your muscles to recover. A lot of people go into weight training thinking that they can train seven days a week without ever letting their bodies rest. You break down muscle tissue in the gym, but you GROW outside the gym -- that is, if you get the right amount of nutrients and REST!

    Third, the training program. Your training program is what a person would do if they wanted to LOSE weight, not gain weight. Your reps are way to high. I mean doing 15 reps of 4 sets is what you would do when you want to get ripped up, toned or lose weight. If you want to gain weight, you need to first gain strength and then up your weights that you lift, which means lowering your rep range. To add strength, you need to stick to 5 to 10 reps at a weight that you can do no more than 10 reps. If you are doing 5 reps of a weight, then you should not even be able to push the sixth one even if you wanted to. It must be to failure!!!

    If you want hypertrophy (muscle building), then you can do 8 to 12 reps, again to failure. Key point to remember, though, is that it's all about concentration. You must have excellent form, slow movements and focus only on the muscle, not on all of the hot guys walking around. Feel the brain/muscle connection. With every rep, you must feel every muscle twitching and working, so concentrate on what you are doing, using good form. If your form breaks, then lose the ego and lower the weights.

    Oh, don't over do it on the cardio. Cardio is great for cardiovascular health and allows you to maintain strenuous workouts, but doing too much cardio can be detrimental to your gains. If you're a hardgainer, then I wouldn't do more than two or three days of cardio a week, and those should not be done on the days you are training. If you are not a hardgainer, then you can do more, but keep track of your weight, and if you notice you're not gaining enough weight, then back off of the cardio.

    So, basically, eat more, train right, rest, and ease up on the cardio.



    Thanks I will apply as much as i can I am on an aircraft carrier so i will try to do as much as possibleicon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 19, 2011 2:56 AM GMT
    Buy a 20 lb weight vest.