Water won't hydrate you.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 20, 2011 4:20 AM GMT
    Please tell me this is a joke.

    http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2011/11/19/EU-bans-dehydration-claim-for-water/UPI-95401321745281/?spt=hs∨=on

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/eu/8897662/EU-bans-claim-that-water-can-prevent-dehydration.html

    Disclaimer: I am not familiar with either of these two news agencies, which is why I quoted both. I found other stories about this through a Google search. It seems to be legit.
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    Nov 20, 2011 4:50 AM GMT
    It's like banning the marketing of food to assuage hunger. Of course it does, but to market it like a distinguishing feature is like selling something that isn't really real. Are the water sellers trying to say that drinking, say, milk doesn't hydrate? If so, milk producers are going to want to put the same label on milk cartons.

    Imagine if every food or water item has to "advertise" itself with a label saying: x or y rehydrates or fills your stomach.icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 20, 2011 4:58 AM GMT
    "They applied for the right to state that “regular consumption of significant amounts of water can reduce the risk of development of dehydration” as well as preventing a decrease in performance. "

    This statement is somewhat dangerous. "Significant" can be interpreted variously, and in people prone to hyponatremia (for whatever reason, e.g. CHF, SIADH, cirrhosis, people running marathons) this could be dangerous to the point of being life threatening.

    The brain's pretty smart in most cases to function as an osmostat, i.e. you'll be thirsty when you should be. Dehydration in the absence of lack of access to water and the absence of other factors such as drugs, debility, old age (some elderly people seem not to sense thirst as well as they should), abnormal kidney function (e.g. diabetes insipidus) or massive water losses (e.g. diarrhea) IS ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE.

    Put in another way, you CANNOT prevent dehydration by drinking water regularly, since you can't prevent, say, becoming old and having diabetes insipidus by drinking water. You can correct dehydration by drinking water.

    On the other hand, you CAN develop something called water intoxication:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_intoxication
    I've actually seen textbook cases of psychogenic polydipsia when psych patients drink water from the toilet after they were water restricted.

    As for "performance," it's such a bogus term that I don't see any reason they would even put it in there. The FDA would have granted that as a "unverified" statement on the label.

    My 2 cents as a nephrologist.icon_razz.gif
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3280

    Nov 21, 2011 12:10 AM GMT
    I am more concerned with the Alkaline water fad. Wait till it gets to your neck of the woods.
    Some use KHCO3 as the alkanilizing agent. I can retire on this silly fad.


    Even more ridiculous is the notion that we should pay 2-3 dollars a bottle for designer water.

    With all the taxes in most municipalities the water from the tap should be drinkable.

    One thing in NYC is it is. All other areas of the country should aspire to that.
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3280

    Nov 21, 2011 7:47 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 saidMore here:

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    I agree with q1w2e3, its a fine medical point.

    But the fact they spent time on making it is not surprising. In england anabolic steroids are available to anyone who wants for personal use.

    Better said "water can aid in re hydration".
  • Bowyn_Aerrow

    Posts: 357

    Nov 21, 2011 10:06 AM GMT
    A meeting of 21 scientists in Parma, Italy, concluded that reduced water content in the body was a symptom of dehydration and not something that drinking water could subsequently control.

    From your second link.

    Without seeing the research one can only guess what 'subsequently control' means.

    It may be a report that stated that minerals and salts are also needed to regulate hydration - what many call electrolytes.

    Water on its own can actually strip out important salts out of the body in cases of severe dehydration, thus it is NOT recommended to drink lots of water, but to drink fluids with electrolytes in it after getting dehydrated, since ingesting too much water increases the side issues.

  • musclmed

    Posts: 3280

    Nov 21, 2011 3:07 PM GMT
    Bowyn_Aerrow saidA meeting of 21 scientists in Parma, Italy, concluded that reduced water content in the body was a symptom of dehydration and not something that drinking water could subsequently control.

    From your second link.

    Without seeing the research one can only guess what 'subsequently control' means.

    It may be a report that stated that minerals and salts are also needed to regulate hydration - what many call electrolytes.

    Water on its own can actually strip out important salts out of the body in cases of severe dehydration, thus it is NOT recommended to drink lots of water, but to drink fluids with electrolytes in it after getting dehydrated, since ingesting too much water increases the side issues.



    So that you understand its Bottle water would be better than nothing. The slogan they used was likely contrived by a advertising executive.

    Water doesn't strip electrolytes . Its simple. If you drink free water ( free water means pure H20) and you loose Water with electrolytes in Urine/Sweat/Stool you have a net loss of Sodium and other positional minerals.

    Your statement is partially correct. However I would add, the small amount of electrolytes say in Gatorade are INSIGNIFICANT and worthless.

    It depends on the cause of dehydration, the medical conditions of the patient, age etc.

    But in general I believe the EU committee had been contemplating a comparison between say Pedialyte.


    Last I would say, if I was dehydrated and my serum sodium was elevated. I would prefer a few liters of bottle free water, than say and IV fluid drip of say a ER doctor. Part of our intelligent design Free water via the GI tract is probably safer for most than any artificial drip.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 21, 2011 10:41 PM GMT
    musclmed said
    Last I would say, if I was dehydrated and my serum sodium was elevated. I would prefer a few liters of bottle free water, than say and IV fluid drip of say a ER doctor. Part of our intelligent design evolutionary baggage: Free water via the GI tract is probably safer for most than any artificial drip.


    Corrected.icon_lol.gif