SIGN AND SHARE // Russia making it illegal to say "gay" in the street

  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Nov 22, 2011 4:57 AM GMT
    I just added my voice to this urgent appeal, standing for human rights in Russia and all over the world. Medvedev and Putin's party is pushing a law to vote this week that would make any mention of lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender issues illegal.

    The bill, being introduced as early as this Wednesday, would criminalize any book, article or speech about sexual identity and gender orientation, labeling it "homosexual propaganda". This is outrageous, and now is the time for key world leaders to speak up, we need every voice.

    HERE ! http://www.allout.org/en/actions/russia_silenced/
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    Nov 22, 2011 4:59 AM GMT
    my best friend is Russian,and I heard that a lot of earlier US broadcasts such as US films / television programs were banned simply because they depicted life in North America, and were considered free market propaganda. Id still like to travel to Russia one day.
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Nov 22, 2011 5:26 AM GMT
    Okay, I'm off to bed. When I wake, I want 200 000 e-signatures icon_biggrin.gif
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    Nov 22, 2011 5:29 AM GMT
    20 years of freedom in Russia...
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Nov 22, 2011 2:18 PM GMT
    Bump !
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    Nov 22, 2011 2:38 PM GMT
    Bump. I get several Russian TV channels. State controls everything. A few years ago an independent station had a puppet show that satirized politicians. One was a Putin puppet. He got pretty angry. First the show was taken off the air, then the state owned utility Gazprom needed to take over the station for "financial reasons".

    But let's enjoy that reset in our relations kissing up and saying all is fine.
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    Nov 22, 2011 2:40 PM GMT
    The government has decided that it "knows what's best" apparently. It's almost like DADT but on a grand scale. It both protects and disenfranchises the gay community in Russia.
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    Nov 22, 2011 2:51 PM GMT
    Just signed it then.

    Not only does this restrict the freedom of speech for the LGBT community in Russia, but I would imagine that vital health information, e.g. about HIV/AIDS and condom use for gay men, would be illegal as 'homosexual propaganda'. This is of great concern and particularly worrisome to see Russia slide further down an anti-democratic path.
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    Nov 22, 2011 2:55 PM GMT
    It's terrible, yet so not surprising.
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    Nov 22, 2011 2:55 PM GMT
    mocktwinkie saidThe government has decided that it "knows what's best" apparently. It's almost like DADT but on a grand scale. It both protects and disenfranchises the gay community in Russia.


    I fail to see how this protects the gay community in Russia. Suppose that a gay man is attacked in the street because of his sexuality, and this problem is not reported because it's been ruled illegal ? Or what if HIV infection rates among gay men started to rise in Russian communities, how would the general populace learn of the problem if it's illegal to say anything about it ?

    With the stroke of a pen, this sort of law effectively denies the existence of an entire minority.
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    Nov 22, 2011 3:05 PM GMT
    kangourou said
    mocktwinkie saidThe government has decided that it "knows what's best" apparently. It's almost like DADT but on a grand scale. It both protects and disenfranchises the gay community in Russia.


    I fail to see how this protects the gay community in Russia. Suppose that a gay man is attacked in the street because of his sexuality, and this problem is not reported because it's been ruled illegal ? Or what if HIV infection rates among gay men started to rise in Russian communities, how would the general populace learn of the problem if it's illegal to say anything about it ?

    With the stroke of a pen, this sort of law effectively denies the existence of an entire minority.


    Well, theoretically it would also in some, probably unrealistic way, prevent homophobes from "outing" those who wish to keep their sexuality secret in a society that generally doesn't accept it and where they might get harmed if they are open about it. But yeah, I see what you're saying.
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Nov 22, 2011 3:10 PM GMT
    kangourou said
    mocktwinkie saidThe government has decided that it "knows what's best" apparently. It's almost like DADT but on a grand scale. It both protects and disenfranchises the gay community in Russia.


    I fail to see how this protects the gay community in Russia. Suppose that a gay man is attacked in the street because of his sexuality, and this problem is not reported because it's been ruled illegal ? Or what if HIV infection rates among gay men started to rise in Russian communities, how would the general populace learn of the problem if it's illegal to say anything about it ?

    With the stroke of a pen, this sort of law effectively denies the existence of an entire minority.


    This sounds like a legal virtual genocide. icon_confused.gif
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Nov 22, 2011 4:28 PM GMT
    Amnesty InternationalAmnesty International today urged authorities in Russia’s second largest city not to enact a homophobic bill, saying it would threaten freedom of expression and fuel discrimination against the city’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) community.

    The bill, which St. Petersburg’s city assembly passed nearly unanimously on the first of three readings on Wednesday, effectively bans public events by LGBTI people and organizations under the pretext of protecting minors.

    If enacted, the law would allow authorities to impose fines of up to the equivalent of US$1,600 for “public actions aimed at propaganda of sodomy, lesbianism, bisexuality, and transgenderism among minors.”

    “This bill is a thinly veiled attempt to legalize discrimination against lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender people in Russia’s second-biggest city,” said Nicola Duckworth, Amnesty International’s Europe and Central Asia Programme Director.

    “The notion that LGBTI rights activists are somehow converting Russia’s youth through ‘propaganda’ would be laughable, if the potential effects of this new law weren’t so dangerous and wide-reaching.”

    Local LGBTI rights activists have blasted the law, saying it will provide legal cover for banning any of their actions, including the distribution of information leaflets or even actions against homophobia.

    Under the measure, freedom of assembly and expression for LGBTI groups would be prohibited anywhere children might be present. This would rule out nearly all public events carried out by or on behalf of LGBTI people and organizations.

    The publication of anything relating to LGBTI rights or providing assistance or advice – including informative leaflets as well as publications in the media and on the internet – would also be severely curtailed.

    Other Russian cities like Moscow have planned legislation to ban “propaganda for homosexuality”, while Arkhangelsk and the region of Riazan have already introduced such legislation.

    Although consensual same-sex activity was decriminalized in Russia in 1993, LGBTI people still face widespread discrimination and violence.

    LGBTI activists’ attempts to organize Pride marches, cultural festivals and other events in major cities, including St. Petersburg, have frequently been met with official red tape and violence from anti-gay groups, among them people associating themselves with the Orthodox Church. Violent attacks against LGBTI activists often go unpunished.

    “Legislation like that proposed in St. Petersburg will only further marginalize LGBTI people, and must be stopped,” said Nicola Duckworth.

    “Instead of seeking to restrict freedom of expression and assembly for LGBTI people, Russian authorities should be doing more to safeguard their rights and protect them from discrimination and violence.”
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Nov 22, 2011 6:36 PM GMT
    Don't you know bump it up, you got to bump it up !

    30 000 signatures since yesterday when I got to bed. Wowz !