X-Men and gay related

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    Nov 24, 2011 9:48 AM GMT
    I watched the x-men cartoons when i was a child, but it was merely for fun and i didn't think much.

    But when i watched the Xmen movies series, i somehow felt related to the struggling and the feeling of being different. The part where Iceman came back to his house to tell his family the truth is almost like a "coming out" scene, where the mother blamed herself and the father wanted to find a way to cure him (this is just a relating, not saying that Iceman is gay).

    So do you feel like X-men is somehow dedicated for the different society of the world, including gay?
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    Nov 24, 2011 10:44 AM GMT
    211389%20-%20Marvel%20Rule_63%20Wolverin

    Maybe just lesbians
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    Nov 24, 2011 3:24 PM GMT
    Oh, absolutely. That's the main part why I gravitated to X-Men and love it so much. It definitely points to various socio-political strifes involving minorities and outcasts, not just gays/lesbians/etc.

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    Nov 24, 2011 3:27 PM GMT
    "Have you tried... not being a mutant?!" icon_biggrin.gif

    Bryan Singer (director) is gay in real life so he really made the gay overtones very apparent throughout the first two movies.

    I think X-Men, in general, is supposed to be about those who feel differently in one respect or another. I see parallels between X-Men and Harry Potter; the whole theme of prejudice and fear toward those who are different.

    Also, there's a whole field of psychology that involves superhero alternate egos and how teens relate to those dynamics.
    For example, LGBTQ people relate because it's the whole idea of trying to put on a mundane persona (Clark Kent for example) but then having those moments where you show who you really are (Superman).

    They are stories about personal empowerment and using your own personal talents to shine in some way or another in the face of evil or adversity.

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    Nov 24, 2011 3:35 PM GMT
    tyklong saidI watched the x-men cartoons when i was a child, but it was merely for fun and i didn't think much.

    But when i watched the Xmen movies series, i somehow felt related to the struggling and the feeling of being different. The part where Iceman came back to his house to tell his family the truth is almost like a "coming out" scene, where the mother blamed herself and the father wanted to find a way to cure him (this is just a relating, not saying that Iceman is gay).

    So do you feel like X-men is somehow dedicated for the different society of the world, including gay?


    That's the MAIN Jist of the Mutant universe
  • tuffguyndc

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    Nov 24, 2011 3:36 PM GMT
    well i never thought that much about it
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    Nov 24, 2011 4:45 PM GMT
    guy27 said"Have you tried... not being a mutant?!" icon_biggrin.gif
    Bryan Singer (director) is gay in real life so he really made the gay overtones very apparent throughout the first two movies.

    Oh, THAT explains it!
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    Nov 24, 2011 4:47 PM GMT
    I agree with you guys 100%. One of the reasons why I was kind of obsessed with X-Men, and Marvel as a whole, is because I to felt different from the rest of the society. I understood their struggles living in a world that was not accepting of people who were different and understood the importance of fighting to protect who are you.

    Honestly, I probably couldn't have gotten through my childhood if it not for Marvel...as sad as that may sound. As a side note, I am happy that gay characters are coming out (pun intended) in both novels and comics. Marvel for instance, now has Wiccan and Hulking ^_^.

    WICCAN IS THE SHIT!
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    Nov 24, 2011 4:50 PM GMT
    I think they did an interview about it, Stan Lee I mean and he mentioned about everything you just said plus other stuff. I don't remember if it was in the special features for one of the movies or they did so on TV or a magazine or something.
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    Nov 24, 2011 5:02 PM GMT
    AlexanderB saidI agree with you guys 100%. One of the reasons why I was kind of obsessed with X-Men, and Marvel as a whole, is because I to felt different from the rest of the society. I understood their struggles living in a world that was not accepting of people who were different and understood the importance of fighting to protect who are you.

    Honestly, I probably couldn't have gotten through my childhood if it not for Marvel...as sad as that may sound. As a side note, I am happy that gay characters are coming out (pun intended) in both novels and comics. Marvel for instance, now has Wiccan and Hulking ^_^.

    WICCAN IS THE SHIT!


    North Star and Daken were first
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    Nov 24, 2011 5:04 PM GMT
    Haha and I thought I was the only one!
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    Nov 24, 2011 5:06 PM GMT
    CAN I JUST SAY: X-men are fucking hot.


    I'm not sure if you watched First Class, but that was like, Prof X + Magneto love. icon_smile.gif
  • SirEllingtonB...

    Posts: 497

    Nov 24, 2011 5:19 PM GMT
    I wrote a longer paper in college about this very topic, actually. I use excerpts from it whenever I'm sent out to different high schools and colleges to meet with and talk to the GSAs or other queer unions.

    Every Kids' Hero
    “They faced adversity, hate, and bigotry. They would fall and be defeated by their foes but every time you could count on them to come right back up, stronger and still fighting.”
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    Nov 24, 2011 5:34 PM GMT
    If you look at the evolution of Marvel comic books it shows the evolution of American society. In the 50's and 60's comic books reinforced the idea of the nuclear family and bad guys were seen as enemies to America (Soviets, Nazi's, etc.).

    After Cold War drama was over, Americans began to evolve and so did Marvel comics. Social issues started to shape America and force it away from a hetero-centric mindset in which straight, white men were in power. Marvel comics followed suit and went from being a resource for reinforcing hegemonic ideas of femininity and masculinity to somewhat of an envelope pusher.

    In the 70's Marvel introduced Storm, a strong, female, African-American character, and quickly made her second in command of the X-men, something rather unprecedented for that time. In the 90's Marvel started to introduce gay characters, when being gay was still quite the taboo. And after America went to war with Iraq, Marvel introduced Sooraya Qadir, a middle-eastern muslim character who became known for her patience and compassion. So it could be said that Marvel makes it a point to represent the underdog, possibly in an effort to subliminally educate readers, or maybe to make underdogs feel more understood.

    Regardless, Stan Lee himself, the creator of Marvel Comics, has been staunchly in support of gay rights and has said that he thinks most gay people identify with the X-men because of the idea of their existence: born different and hated for it.

    As an avid reader of X-men, their comic books today aren't so much about mutants fighting crazy aliens, big monsters, or super villains. Now-a-days Cyclops and the gang forces primarily on battling prejudice and combatting anti-mutant legislation, much like the gay community. On a personal note I've always seen X-men as great role models: they still try to do what's right and help to better a world that hates them. Their villains are people who have given into that hate.
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    Nov 24, 2011 5:35 PM GMT
    TheChrisGuy said
    guy27 said"Have you tried... not being a mutant?!" icon_biggrin.gif
    Bryan Singer (director) is gay in real life so he really made the gay overtones very apparent throughout the first two movies.

    Oh, THAT explains it!


    I heard it was actually Joss Whedon (Buffy, Angel, and Firefly) who wrote that line for the movie.

    Whedon has written some storylines for the X men comic books.

    The line was first used on Buffy when her mom asked her: "Have you ever tried not being a Slayer?"
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    Nov 24, 2011 6:15 PM GMT
    AJeJr88 saidIf you look at the evolution of Marvel comic books it shows the evolution of American society. In the 50's and 60's comic books reinforced the idea of the nuclear family and bad guys were seen as enemies to America (Soviets, Nazi's, etc.).

    After Cold War drama was over, Americans began to evolve and so did Marvel comics. Social issues started to shape America and force it away from a hetero-centric mindset in which straight, white men were in power. Marvel comics followed suit and went from being a resource for reinforcing hegemonic ideas of femininity and masculinity to somewhat of an envelope pusher.

    In the 70's Marvel introduced Storm, a strong, female, African-American character, and quickly made her second in command of the X-men, something rather unprecedented for that time. In the 90's Marvel started to introduce gay characters, when being gay was still quite the taboo. And after America went to war with Iraq, Marvel introduced Sooraya Qadir, a middle-eastern muslim character who became known for her patience and compassion. So it could be said that Marvel makes it a point to represent the underdog, possibly in an effort to subliminally educate readers, or maybe to make underdogs feel more understood.

    Regardless, Stan Lee himself, the creator of Marvel Comics, has been staunchly in support of gay rights and has said that he thinks most gay people identify with the X-men because of the idea of their existence: born different and hated for it.

    As an avid reader of X-men, their comic books today aren't so much about mutants fighting crazy aliens, big monsters, or super villains. Now-a-days Cyclops and the gang forces primarily on battling prejudice and combatting anti-mutant legislation, much like the gay community. On a personal note I've always seen X-men as great role models: they still try to do what's right and help to better a world that hates them. Their villains are people who have given into that hate.


    This is sorta off-topic, but it's a huge pet peeve of mine... Stan Lee did not create Marvel Comics. I really fucking hate that guy. He's an egotistical marketing genius who's managed to convince the world that he's solely responsible for Fantastic Four, Spider-Man, X-Men and the rest of the Marvel universe.

    The truth is he was an office assistant for the publishing company that eventually became Marvel Comics, and once he was promoted to editor his role was more of managing and marketing the lineup. During the Golden Age of comics, the artists did a lot of the plotting and the writer's role was to add dialogue, which was awfully clunky back in those days. There's quite a bit of controversy over just how involved Stan Lee was in creating Spider-Man and the other characters he takes credit for. For anyone unconvinced of Stan Lee's actual contribution, I give you: Stripperrella.

    As for X-Men, they really didn't start addressing the societal outcast themes until the Chris Claremont years.
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    Nov 24, 2011 8:08 PM GMT
    You can read up on the X-Men history easily enough, but they were originally created to reflect the racial strife that was going on in America at the time. The theme throughout their entire history has revolved around being hated for being born different.

    In more recent times, the message has evolved (pun intended) to include homosexuality. As others have said, Bryan Singer is openly gay and included gay themes in the first two X-Men movies. The Iceman "coming out" scene was intentionally written to parallel a gay coming out scene. Ian McKellen is also openly gay, and I believe that he had a hand in crafting that scene. Allan Cumming is gay too, but I don't think he was involved.

    North Star, who is gay, is featured in the latest X-Men video game (X-Men: Destiny). (The game isn't very good. It's a rental at best.) They don't really address his sexuality, but they do use the term "significant others" to be inclusive.
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    Nov 24, 2011 9:44 PM GMT
    This has been explored multiple times... but I still love it.
    Probably because X-Men is one of my all time favorite stories.
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    Nov 24, 2011 10:01 PM GMT
    JakeGHK saidI thought it was the leather?....


    THAT's what I thought too!
    I thought some of their costumes were a bit Tom of Finland-ish...icon_cool.gif
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    Nov 24, 2011 10:40 PM GMT
    You’re absolutely right, the X-Men (and mutants in general) do parallel with the societal challenges various groups face. Throughout their history, as people have pointed out, the X-Men in particular have dealt with these issues, always working toward equality for everyone, battling those that jeopardize those ideals, while dealing with internal challenges of being a mutant. They have strong characters (most notably Storm, Phoenix, and Cyclops) that have been through many challenges because of being a mutant and because of who they are as a person. People above have already commented on the progressiveness of comics...there were homosexual characters in the 80s (Northstar, Mystique (bisexual), and Destiny come to mind). Back then, homosexual issues were dealt with subtlety because we weren’t there yet as a society. Now, they deal with those issues openly and frankly (see stories about Graymalkin, Anole, Wiccan, Hulkling, and Northstar).

    Ha...I just realized my X-Men dorkiness is coming out in this forum!!

    Anyways, I’ve always been a fan of the X-Men because of the deeper motivation behind their plight and am glad to see that they have made a positive impact on so many people. Check out the older comics sometime to get the real stories behind the cartoons!
  • calibro

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    Nov 24, 2011 10:48 PM GMT
    actually the x-men were intended to be a civil rights parallel.
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    Nov 25, 2011 1:10 AM GMT
    I totally agree.

    The xmen really do draw an interesting parallel to gay, civil, religious and racial issues.

    One thing I always liked was how magneto was a holocaust survivor and he saw firsthand the evils a society is capable of. Obviously as a result he always believed the ends justified the means. But he is a villain. Despite being on the underdog mutant side, he was still too much.


    Anyway back on topic. I think the xmen are way more universal than just gay rights. It is for anyone oppressed just for the way they are, from a nerd being picked on in school to whole religious groups being persecuted (along with gypsies, the handicaped and anyone without blonde hair/blue eyes) during the holocaust.
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    Nov 25, 2011 1:43 AM GMT
    Totally man! I have thought abut that many many many times. I thought I was the only one...There reality's mutants and our reality's gays. I'm not saying we're mutants but we deal with similar problems
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    Nov 25, 2011 4:50 AM GMT
    earthsearch said
    TheChrisGuy said
    guy27 said"Have you tried... not being a mutant?!" icon_biggrin.gif
    Bryan Singer (director) is gay in real life so he really made the gay overtones very apparent throughout the first two movies.

    Oh, THAT explains it!


    I heard it was actually Joss Whedon (Buffy, Angel, and Firefly) who wrote that line for the movie.

    Whedon has written some storylines for the X men comic books.

    The line was first used on Buffy when her mom asked her: "Have you ever tried not being a Slayer?"

    I thought Angel (you're referring to the hot guy with wings, right?) was the clearest reference to homosexuality besides Bobby - since they even showed how he was struggling with accepting himself way back into early childhood. His dad walking in on him scraping the wings was like finding his secret stash of gay porn.
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    Nov 25, 2011 1:18 PM GMT
    TheChrisGuy said
    I thought Angel (you're referring to the hot guy with wings, right?) was the clearest reference to homosexuality besides Bobby - since they even showed how he was struggling with accepting himself way back into early childhood. His dad walking in on him scraping the wings was like finding his secret stash of gay porn.


    Ah yeah, he's another character that got me related too, how his dad found out he was a mutant, and spent years to cure that out of him, but eventually he decided to break free.