Your Office Space moment

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    Nov 25, 2011 9:10 AM GMT
    Like the main character in the movie Office Space I've come to realize that I hate working in an office. I hate it completely, and I feel like an office sucks the life out of me. Sitting in a desk for over 9 hours a day staring at a computer is just not healthy for me. The thought of having to work in an office sitting in a cubicle for 30 years makes me very sad. The reality is that many professional fields work that way.

    Again, just like Peter, the main character in Office Space sometimes I feel like I would be so much happier with a regular blue collar job where you get to be outside, move, and get some fresh air while doing good, honest work. I'm a college-educated professional and yet somehow I feel like the thought of getting a job in construction or another manual labor would make me a lot happier than being stuck inside an office all day staring at the clock while a little part of me dies everyday. Does anyone else go through this while working in an office environment?

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    Nov 25, 2011 9:25 AM GMT
    Yup. I'm planning to switch careers. Getting tired of sitting in a cubicle all day. Sitting in traffic to and from work. Office politics/drama. Passive aggressive co-workers. Metrics based performance reviews. Asinine job procedures. List goes on.

    I'm also thinking about opening my own business, or go into consulting.
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    Nov 25, 2011 9:33 AM GMT
    I told myself 6 months ago that I would never again work a corporate 9-to-5, and DEFINITELY not inside of an office building.
    I started a 'company' for myself doing photography and video production 6 months ago...

    I'm paying the price right now, my business isn't doing so well... It was always meant as a stepping stone to help me move out of this town, anyways... But I still stand by that claim I made: I will not work in an office or doing something I do not want to do. I need interaction and diversity to stay sane. I'd rather not spend my life hating my job in order to have more opportunity outside of work. With that said - I don't mind any sort of job that gives me social interaction and the ability to express myself and meet people... so I'm not limiting it too much.

    I believe a career should be enjoyable...

    Meh. We'll see how long it takes me to cave. Food is expensive.
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    Nov 25, 2011 10:26 AM GMT
    These are some of the same reasons above why I enjoyed the US Army so much: I was never confined to a desk for very long, and I was always doing something new & different. Whether it was running around out in the woods doing tactical exercises, teaching college-level ROTC, designing a multimedia lecture hall for a counterterrorism course, editor of a military journal, commanding a company, devising Army-wide personnel policies, and countless other jobs, I never did the same thing twice nor for long. And it was just fun, at least to me, and simply the way the Army is set-up to operate, at least within the Officer Corps.

    The boring sameness of many civilian careers horrifies me as much as many others here. I could never do a 9-to-5 job behind a desk for years on end, and never have. If the military isn't for you, then I suppose creative arts would be the thing, to include the visual and also entertainment.
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    Nov 25, 2011 4:00 PM GMT
    I telecommute but deal with the same problems that others have stated. The office politics and turf wars are driving me crazy. I'm ready for something different. My partner and I have been talking a lot with a friend of ours about starting our own business. I'm sick of working for others.
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    Nov 25, 2011 4:14 PM GMT
    I fortunately do not work in an "office" type setting but I am sorry to hear you are feeling this way.

    I'd recommend maybe taking 3x10 minute walks during the day. Outside if you're able. It loosens you up, gets the juices flowing, gets your heart rate up (even if just a little) and your brain will feel better and thank you for it.

    Best to you icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 25, 2011 4:25 PM GMT
    I'd love to work from home... But it'll never happen in my field (international education).
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    Nov 25, 2011 5:04 PM GMT
    I am with you. Ten hour days staring at 3 monitors. You never see the Manager or Sups, they are in meetings or send you "reminders" via email. I am looking for something else. It took me 10 years to get where I am at and where is that? I hate it too. I have to stop being comfortable and get my ass in gear and really look for something better. Someone showed me an article about those that sit for hours every day. No matter what kind of exercise you do after or before work you are taking hours off your lifespan just sitting. This doesn't include destroying your eyes staring at monitors!
  • a303guy

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    Nov 25, 2011 6:57 PM GMT
    Spent 7 years working in either a cube or a too-small office, doing the 'Corporate' thing. Loved the pay and the benefits, hated being cooped up in an office, and as other posters have noted, the inner-office drama/backstabbing/intrigue/whatever drove me crazy. Couple that with my not-yet-being-out, and the stress was just too much.

    left it all behind, and returned to my roots, driving cars and teaching performance driving, and couldnt be happier. Making a fraction of what I used to, but I'm OK with that. Peace of mind, and working primarily outdoors is what I need to be doing.
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    Nov 25, 2011 7:12 PM GMT
    I don't think I could stand being in an office/corporate environment. I had an interview for a job like that a couple of months ago and I think I would have always been curious if I hadn't had that experience, but once it was over I knew I wasn't going to take it by the time I got to the elevator. Would have been nice to have the pay and benefits but I know I'm happier making $10 an hour doing what I do now, and I can build upon that.
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    Nov 25, 2011 7:24 PM GMT
    There is just no motivation to get up in the morning only to end up spending 9+ hours in such a static environment. Sometimes as soon as I get there I just put on my headphones and listen to my music in hopes that the situation will improve, but I know it's only a temporary solution.

    Even the money game seems like its different now in this economy. If you take a group of people who work in labor versus a group of people who work in a professional office environment you might find that the group in labor are not only happier but they're making a higher wage than the professionals. I have a lot of friends who do manual labor and are able to buy their own house, cars, etc. I can barely afford to move out of my parents house. WTF?
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    Nov 25, 2011 7:30 PM GMT
    In my old kitchen we had a steam cooker that always liked to break down at the worst possible moment a few times a week. I was tempted to bid on it when they finally replaced it, and sent it to an auction, just so i could beat the crap out of it.
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    Nov 25, 2011 7:33 PM GMT
    I'm going to go against the grain a little and say that I don't think working a desk job is all that bad. Working in computers gives me mental stimulation that a manual labor job wouldn't. Every job has its problems, and office politics exist everywhere, even if you don't have a physical office.

    Having said that, I totally understand what you are saying. That's why I left the big corporations and started working for small businesses. It's a lot riskier, but the corporate insanity is just stifling. There is no incentive to excel. In the last big corporate job I had, the bureaucracy of the performance review system made it almost impossible to advance based on your work. Essentially, the only way to move up was to stick around long enough. You were rewarded for aging and that's about it.

    I can argue this both ways. On the one hand, you're young and now would be a better time to change career paths before you settle down (if that's your goal). On the other hand, the economy sucks and will for the foreseeable future. You may want to stick with something more certain. You may also have option #3 - start your own side business while keeping your main job. That is going to suck up all of your free time though.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Nov 25, 2011 7:33 PM GMT
    I love my office..... I'm here now. It really is about the best possible office one could have.. in a country club building... 12 foot ceilings, new carpet, shades, lighting and paint.... and its mine. But I come and go frequently with clients here and with me going to see them. Not sure how I'd feel if I just had a small space and had to look at a computer all day.

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    Nov 25, 2011 7:46 PM GMT
    DudeInNOVA saidI'm going to go against the grain a little and say that I don't think working a desk job is all that bad. Working in computers gives me mental stimulation that a manual labor job wouldn't. Every job has its problems, and office politics exist everywhere, even if you don't have a physical office.

    Having said that, I totally understand what you are saying. That's why I left the big corporations and started working for small businesses. It's a lot riskier, but the corporate insanity is just stifling. There is no incentive to excel. In the last big corporate job I had, the bureaucracy of the performance review system made it almost impossible to advance based on your work. Essentially, the only way to move up was to stick around long enough. You were rewarded for aging and that's about it.

    I can argue this both ways. On the one hand, you're young and now would be a better time to change career paths before you settle down (if that's your goal). On the other hand, the economy sucks and will for the foreseeable future. You may want to stick with something more certain. You may also have option #3 - start your own side business while keeping your main job. That is going to suck up all of your free time though.


    Hey, thanks DudeIn... That's actually really good advice. My own business is something that I've always wanted to do, however risky. You bring up a good point about the economy, which is why I'm still at my current job. I spent 2 years looking for a job and I'm thankful just to be working. As much as I hate my current job, I'll have to stick around until I find something better.
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    Nov 25, 2011 8:27 PM GMT
    sahem62896 saidI'd love to work from home... But it'll never happen in my field (international education).


    lol, I teach from home using the internet to people mostly in the US & Canada, but also Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Latin America...
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    Nov 25, 2011 10:11 PM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidI love my office..... I'm here now. It really is about the best possible office one could have.. in a country club building... 12 foot ceilings, new carpet, shades, lighting and paint.... and its mine. But I come and go frequently with clients here and with me going to see them. Not sure how I'd feel if I just had a small space and had to look at a computer all day.

    icon_mad.gif


    Plus I think you are your own boss from what I read. You don't have to whore yourself out at one of these corporations that steal your soul icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 26, 2011 1:21 AM GMT
    Having worked both a regular office job, and in a job with absolutely no set schedule (which I am now), I can say there's advantages to both.

    Right now, I work in events and entertainment. Starting Sunday, I'll be working 26 days in a row, 12 to 14 hours a day. It's Christmas season, so everyone wants their event to be absolutely special, and they all want me to devote 100% of my resources to them. I love the creative aspect of what I do, but I hate the soul-sucking effort it takes to work in this business.

    An 8-to-5 job has the benefit of regularity. You can plan things with a set schedule. You can look forward to weekends and holidays and vacations. Couple that with a reasonable employer, and I can totally see the benefit of this type of environment. I think it all comes down to how you're wired and where your passions lie.