Food Inc.

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    Nov 26, 2011 10:43 PM GMT
    Ugh, is it time to become a vegetarian?
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    Nov 26, 2011 10:44 PM GMT
    last jan. i watched this and have extremely cut back ! the movie is gross and disgusting and shows how awful the food industry has become

    esp the whole part about the boy and jack n the box
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    Nov 27, 2011 6:25 PM GMT
    JakeGHK said
    mikeinslc saidUgh, is it time to become a vegetarian?


    There's issues with that as well Ive heard.


    Yeah but you wont hear a peice of celary scream as it's neck is being broken...
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    Nov 27, 2011 6:26 PM GMT
    You don't have to participate in the factory food system just because you want to eat meat. Just look at what you are buying.
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    Nov 27, 2011 7:03 PM GMT
    I mean, being a vegetarian is healthy and does a lot for the environment, but what you really need to watch out for are the horrible corporations, like Monsanto, who mass produce our produce.. These are the people that the Occupy Wall Street movement are trying to oppress and take down. Corrupt corporations who sacrifice the well being of the majority of people for their own greed... These are the people who inject hormones and pesticides in all of our food, who genetically modify food, who shut down small farmers to take their land, who pump us with high fructose corn syrup, who generally poison the main food supply of this country. Don't believe me? google it.
    I'm surprised after watching Food, Inc. you were only concerned about the meat industry. All food industries are corrupt and I feel the world would be a much healthier and natural place if we reverted to local farmers instead of giant, mass producing industries.
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    Nov 29, 2011 6:34 AM GMT
    The subject matter's important so I figured I'd bump this even though there are already several threads on "Food Inc." (can't get url link to post):

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/?searchtext=food%20inc.
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    Nov 29, 2011 1:52 PM GMT
    I've had to hunt for food during ice storms.
    What they're doing to animals is bad, but it's needed for survival.
    If everyone became a vegetarian, we'd run out of fertile soil for growing.
  • buckled

    Posts: 165

    Nov 29, 2011 1:55 PM GMT
    Because of that movie I now buy...

    Free Range Organic Chicken / Eggs
    Organic Milk / Cheese

    Etc... ugh... memories of health class... soo nasty!

    *Edit bc I can't spell! =)
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    Nov 29, 2011 1:58 PM GMT
    LOL it was a shit film with one or two good scenes. Liked the scene with Bruce Willis and yes some the facts revealed are hurl inducing ........so glad I don't live in the U.S.
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    Nov 29, 2011 3:55 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidI've had to hunt for food during ice storms.
    What they're doing to animals is bad, but it's needed for survival.
    If everyone became a vegetarian, we'd run out of fertile soil for growing.


    Probably it takes more energy, land & supplies to feed veggies to animals and then eat the animals than it does to eat the veggies directly.

    To your point on survival, yes, before modern storage techniques & transportation, humans would not have been able to survive winters or so successfully disperse in the world without eating animals. But that doesn't make it required today.

    Even as a small child, meat grossed me out but my parents fed it to me anyway. I'd order everything burnt so that it was unrecognizable as flesh. The family still jokes about me sending most of my meals back to the kitchen to overcook it.

    Then off on my own for the first decade or so, I continued eating meat because that is what I was trained to do. It wasn't until I was in my 30s that I finally realized I don't have to eat meat--as no one was feeding it to me--so I converted to a mostly vegetarian diet (ovo-lacto) which I did for my own health, to reduce some suffering in the world and reduce my reliance on limited resources.

    Some 15-20 years later, barbeque still smells good but I truly enjoy not eating it.

    "Vegetables aren't food. Vegetables are what food eats"~~Alf
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    Nov 29, 2011 4:26 PM GMT
    I myself am an omnivore. I really like Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's perspective which he lays out in The River Cottage Meat Book. Yes it is a cook book on meat which opens with his meat manifesto, the synopsis of which is: think about the meat you eat and the animal that gave its life for it. Was it well cared for; treated with respect; kept safe; feed well and properly; did it have a good life. He ends his manifesto with the following:

    "if we accept that there is any moral content at all in the way we treat animals, thdn you must accept that there is a moral dimension in your dealings with meat."

    The first chapter of the cookbook is the moral justification of eating meat. And factory farmed meat does not make the grade. In short, know where your meat comes from, accept that an animal gave its life for you, eat less quantities of better meat, cook it right (sorry Ant, but it needs to be pink ;) ), and never waste it.

    As for the cook book itself, I highly recommend it.
  • NerdLifter

    Posts: 1509

    Nov 29, 2011 4:45 PM GMT
    letsgo84 said
    paulflexes saidI've had to hunt for food during ice storms.
    What they're doing to animals is bad, but it's needed for survival.
    If everyone became a vegetarian, we'd run out of fertile soil for growing.


    Raising animals and feeding them to people requires about 10 times more farmland than would be used by growing plants to feed the same number of people.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trophic_level

    ^^^ Truth, has to do with basic thermodynamic law dealing with entropy ==> energy loss. Most people don't understand this...

    The argument of not enough farmland for a population of mostly vegetarians assumes we do not feed our livestock farm-grown foodstuffs. In fact, we feed all our livestock land-grown food. There is roughly a 90% energy loss per food-level (conversion efficiency depends on animal and food-stock being used), due to the inefficiencies inherent over-time of food conversion in animal bodies. Thusly, it takes 10x more food to feed an animal enough in order to feed us.

    The only large-scale exception to this is wild fish. The average person doesn't hunt for wild boar, horse, deer, rabbit meat, etc.
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    Nov 29, 2011 6:57 PM GMT
    TriAthInCA saidI myself am an omnivore. ...In short, know where your meat comes from, accept that an animal gave its life for you, eat less quantities of better meat, cook it right (sorry Ant, but it needs to be pink ;) ), and never waste it...


    You and my brother are going to get along famously. His motto: "I'll eat anything that's lived." How he used to gross me out when we were kids. Still does. Heck, that was my whole family. Mom, uncle, all of them ordered meat with a pulse. I was the odd one out.

    I do however appreciate the train of thinking in your post on the conscientious scavenging of helpless furry-cute animals (just kidding). I never claimed vegan ways. The last car I wanted only came with leather seats so I'm not even trying. There certainly is a humbling dignity in honoring life sacrificed for the betterment of others. Not out of gluttony but with the reduction of suffering in mind, I just try to minimize my impact as I am able.

    I realize that if the economy completely tanks and I wind up on a farm with family but without my Morningstar fake meats, probably I'll be eating real meat again. But I'll be out working the fields during the day. I presume my brother will be doing all the butchering.
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    Nov 29, 2011 9:12 PM GMT
    theantijock said
    TriAthInCA saidI myself am an omnivore. ...In short, know where your meat comes from, accept that an animal gave its life for you, eat less quantities of better meat, cook it right (sorry Ant, but it needs to be pink ;) ), and never waste it...


    I realize that if the economy completely tanks and I wind up on a farm with family but without my Morningstar fake meats, probably I'll be eating real meat again. But I'll be out working the fields during the day. I presume my brother will be doing all the butchering.


    I have the luxury that I can afford to buy meat from a real butcher, where I know the farms he sources his products from. I pay through the nose for that luxury and recognise its not an option for most folks who are trying to get by. As is often the case, moral imperatives take a back seat to economics.
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    Nov 29, 2011 9:37 PM GMT
    Mike,
    SLC has an excellent and growing sustainable food movement. Google on SLC and "sustainable food" to find links to some of the co-ops, home-grow clubs and butchers. You can also try searching under "transition movement".