Why do Brazilians call things they don't like "boring" when they speak English?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 5:51 PM GMT
    I have an ex who used to do that a lot. The other day, a Brazilian friend of mine did the same thing! I find it cute, but I'm curious about it.

    Is there a Portugese word that means "annoying" or "irksome" that sounds like the word "boring"?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 5:52 PM GMT
    Chato= boring, annoying.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:11 PM GMT
    Congrats on knowing that Brazilians speak Portuguese icon_cool.gif

    Chato is a new word to me. I've always known maçante.

    Oddly enough, chato in Spanish means a person or an animal with a flat, squished in nose.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:12 PM GMT
    facepalm
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:17 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidCongrats on knowing that Brazilians speak Portuguese icon_cool.gif

    Chato is a new word to me. I've always known maçante.

    Oddly enough, chato in Spanish means a person or an animal with a flat, squished in nose.


    As an adjective, it could also mean flat in Portuguese!

    Also, as a noun it could mean crabs (not the kind you eat).

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:19 PM GMT
    Hehe, I'm always amused by false friends in Portuguese and Spanish. Some differences can be quite hilarious.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:22 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidHehe, I'm always amused by false friends in Portuguese and Spanish. Some differences can be quite hilarious.


    A funny one:

    Embarazada (Spanish): Pregnant

    Embarassada (Portuguese): Embarrassed


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:26 PM GMT
    I am working on Portuguese so I know enough when I go to Rio for the 2016 Olympics icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:33 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidI am working on Portuguese so I know enough when I go to Rio for the 2016 Olympics icon_cool.gif


    They're learning English too:

    aula+de+ingl%C3%AAs+para+assaltar.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:37 PM GMT
    I think they'd shoot me if I spoke Portuguese from Portugal in place of just English icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:42 PM GMT
    I find Portuguese from Portugal a lot prettier than Brazilian Portuguese. It is a bit sad and dark, kinda like Fado. Brazilian Portuguese is a little too mellow.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:45 PM GMT
    They sound very different to me. Personally I find European Portuguese to sound very slushy. Final syllables tend to mush together or disappear. Sounds almost like a Slavic language at times icon_smile.gif But people in Brazil have little to no exposure of media from Portugal, so I can see how it's next to impossible for Brazilians to understand the Portuguese.

    I suppose I understand Brazilian Portuguese better because I've heard more of it. It's slightly more articulate and familiar to the ears.

    Neither is any closer to Spanish though, lol. Only Galician does. Galician has been so Castilianized over the centuries that it doesn't sound anything like Portuguese despite being more closely related to Portuguese.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:50 PM GMT
    My bf is Portuguese but from the islands. One thing Ive noticed Portuguese love samba icon_smile.gif and they also dance it specially the younger generations
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 6:59 PM GMT
    pocketnico saidThey sound very different to me. Personally I find European Portuguese to sound very slushy. Final syllables tend to mush together or disappear. Sounds almost like a Slavic language at times icon_smile.gif But people in Brazil have little to no exposure of media from Portugal, so I can see how it's next to impossible for Brazilians to understand the Portuguese.

    I suppose I understand Brazilian Portuguese better because I've heard more of it. It's slightly more articulate and familiar to the ears.

    Neither is any closer to Spanish though, lol. Only Galician does. Galician has been so Castilianized over the centuries that it doesn't sound anything like Portuguese despite being more closely related to Portuguese.


    I agree, European Portuguese is very slushy. Specially with the whole SHHHH thing. I find that pretty charming though.

    Brazilian Portuguese is a lot easier to comprehend, mostly because it is slow-sounding and it has really drawn out vowels.

    I love European Spanish too, though I realize there are many different regional accents in Spain. I guess I'm used to Madrid accents because I just love Almodovar movies!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2011 7:11 PM GMT
    interestingly in french ennui is also problem, boredom or difficulty