College Major

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 02, 2011 8:21 AM GMT
    Hey guys, how's it going. I'm a recent college student and looking to get into the field of psychology within the next few years. I love the study and all but I want a broader range of majors I can go into. I'm actually interested in Physiology and Forensic Sciences but I don't know too much in depth about what goes on in those fields.

    I just wanted to get some info about what careers you've guys have gone into, past and recent ones, whether you enjoy them or prefer doing something else and what you do in your field. Also any recommendations and advice would be appreciated. Thanks in advance!
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    Dec 02, 2011 2:16 PM GMT
    fns_swimmer saidHey guys, how's it going. I'm a recent college student and looking to get into the field of psychology within the next few years. I love the study and all but I want a broader range of majors I can go into. I'm actually interested in Physiology and Forensic Sciences but I don't know too much in depth about what goes on in those fields.

    I just wanted to get some info about what careers you've guys have gone into, past and recent ones, whether you enjoy them or prefer doing something else and what you do in your field. Also any recommendations and advice would be appreciated. Thanks in advance!


    Go to your college's career service and take their assesment. That will help a lot! I'm a Criminal Justice major but the reasons for why I got in to it have NOTHING to do with my interest. I am good at it, I just hate it! lol.
  • buckled

    Posts: 165

    Dec 02, 2011 2:27 PM GMT
    Just a forewarning... you can't really do anything with a Psychology degree unless you get a masters. Otherwise you're looking at teaching high school... if that's what you want though go for it!
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    Dec 02, 2011 2:38 PM GMT
    Psychology is great major because if you decide not to go for the additional degrees you'll need in order to practice, it still applies generally to many career fields. With a psyc degree, you could go into Business, Law, HR, Law Enforcement, FBI/CIA, Forensics and on. Great major and I actually still use some of the human behavior class info.

    I got my psyc degree and went into Human Resources and I have worked with hiring managers in some of the largest Fortune 100 companies in the country.
    I loved the classes I studied, particularly industrial psych (work place/organizational dynamics) and abnormal psych (pathologies - disorders). Plus the classes often will nicely overlap with other majors/minors (sociology, pre-law, business, anthro etc).

    Good luck and have fun with it.
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    Dec 02, 2011 2:45 PM GMT
    As a Psych major, I advise you to seriously think about how dedicated you are to this field. You really can't get anything in the field with just a BA (psych majors are a dime a dozen). Getting a Ph.D requires some major dedication, but it's definitely something you should consider if you want a career that gets you somewhere.

    If you like forensics, consider Anthropology and going to grad school for forensic anthro. Or get a chem degree. With Psych, the most you could probably do along those lines is criminal profiling and you'd probably be better off going the criminal justice route.
  • austex85

    Posts: 572

    Dec 02, 2011 2:58 PM GMT
    another thing to consider: save for a few majors (like the hard sciences and specific business degrees like finance/accounting), your chosen major likely will have nothing to do with what you do in life afterwards.
  • vintovka

    Posts: 588

    Dec 02, 2011 3:14 PM GMT
    You might also consider a Masters in Social Work (MSW). It would allow you to do much of what a psychologist does with fewer years in school.
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    Dec 02, 2011 4:56 PM GMT
    I actually was informed by the chief medical examiner in my area that there is a job in exactly what your looking for. Its basically analyzing the physiology of the past few years of someone who's death was either a mystery or unknown to help and determine the cause of death and stuff like that. However to break the bad news for you, hes done over like 8000 autopsy and never had a need for a physc profile. I believe he said there was only 1 in the entire state of WI that he was aware of as well. (You would have to get your PhD tho I think.
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    Dec 02, 2011 5:20 PM GMT
    My advice is to do a double major. Select one major that is personally satisfying to you. College should be a fun experience filled with personal growth. Also select a major that is purely marketable and which will prepare you for economic realities after you graduate. Try to pick majors that cross paths and compliment eachother, as you will be building critical thinking skill sets in the long run too.

    For example, many people combine double majors in foreign language with a business degree. This is great if you want to work in business and travel abroad. The two together are more valuable than each one separately, and will help make your resume more unique among the millions of other college grads.

    Another example, do a double major in environmental science and also philosophy. You will be prepared economically if you stick with just an undergrad, but you will also get some excellent preparation for graduate school in either law, engineering, or environmental protection. In this case, you will gain an excellent technical background (which tends to hold humanities majors back in the workforce) but you will also gain excellent written and verbal analytical skills (the lack of which tends to keep engineers and scientists from reaching management positions later in life.) This last paragraph is a personal reflection on my own experience.

    When selecting your majors, ask yourself whether or not you see graduate school in your future. If you don't want to do grad school, you need to weigh your decisions more on the economic side- finish school and support yourself with less education. If you are going to graduate school, then you can advance in fields that that truly require advanced education, like psychology.

    Also, if things change for you after college, if you don't get accepted to grad school or if you change your mind about your career path, a double major will give you more to fall back on and help you change course. A double major might mean you spend 5 years in college instead of 4, but in the long run that extra year is really insignificant.
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    Dec 02, 2011 5:45 PM GMT
    westanimas saidMy advice is to do a double major. Select one major that is personally satisfying to you. College should be a fun experience filled with personal growth. Also select a major that is purely marketable and which will prepare you for economic realities after you graduate. Try to pick majors that cross paths and compliment eachother, as you will be building critical thinking skill sets in the long run too.

    For example, many people combine double majors in foreign language with a business degree. This is great if you want to work in business and travel abroad. The two together are more valuable than each one separately, and will help make your resume more unique among the millions of other college grads.

    Another example, do a double major in environmental science and also philosophy. You will be prepared economically if you stick with just an undergrad, but you will also get some excellent preparation for graduate school in either law, engineering, or environmental protection. In this case, you will gain an excellent technical background (which tends to hold humanities majors back in the workforce) but you will also gain excellent written and verbal analytical skills (the lack of which tends to keep engineers and scientists from reaching management positions later in life.) This last paragraph is a personal reflection on my own experience.

    When selecting your majors, ask yourself whether or not you see graduate school in your future. If you don't want to do grad school, you need to weigh your decisions more on the economic side- finish school and support yourself with less education. If you are going to graduate school, then you can advance in fields that that truly require advanced education, like psychology.

    Also, if things change for you after college, if you don't get accepted to grad school or if you change your mind about your career path, a double major will give you more to fall back on and help you change course. A double major might mean you spend 5 years in college instead of 4, but in the long run that extra year is really insignificant.



    I'm quite aware that without a PhD in Psychology, there isn't much I can do in terms of jobs. I have however, thought about pursuing a double major that would benefit me more than a degree in psychology alone. I have yet to find what that other major might be however.