Finalists to Lie of the Year 2011: Vote!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 03, 2011 2:17 AM GMT
    http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2011/dec/02/2011-lie-year-finalists/
    I voted for this:
    The stimulus created "zero jobs."

    There's an option for write-in candidates too.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 03, 2011 3:06 AM GMT
    I voted for Romney repeating the claim that Obama went around the world apologising for America.


    I did notice every one of the big Lies has been the subject of threads by SB and his sock. icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 03, 2011 3:10 AM GMT
    Upper_Cdn saidI voted for Romney repeating the claim that Obama went around the world apologising for America.


    I did notice every one of the big Lies has been the subject of threads by SB and his sock. icon_lol.gif

    And who is that sock (or socks)?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 20, 2011 10:17 PM GMT
    Alas, the readers' 1st choice was preempted by the newsworthiness of the winner:


    http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2011/dec/20/how-we-chose-lie-year/
    For the first time since PolitiFact started naming a Lie of the Year, readers and editors have made different choices for the top falsehood.

    PolitiFact editors chose the Democratic line that Republicans voted "to end Medicare" as the 2011 Lie of the Year, while the winner in our reader poll was the Republican claim that "zero jobs" were created by the economic stimulus. (The Medicare claim was No. 3 in the readers' poll.)

    We define the Lie of the Year as the most significant falsehood, the one that had the most impact on the political discourse. In 2010, we chose the claim made by many Republicans that the health care overhaul was "a government takeover." In 2009, we chose Sarah Palin's often-repeated claim that the health care plan included "death panels."

    Both were easily the top choices for PolitiFact editors and our readers. This year, the choice was not as clear.

    ...
    We received 9,214 votes, nearly triple the number from 2010. The full results are below.

    The "Zero jobs" claim, which won the readers’ poll with 24 percent of the vote, had been a popular Republican talking point that was uttered by everyone from Rick Perry to the National Republican Senatorial Committee. But we concluded it was more a falsehood from last year, when there was more debate about the stimulus, than this year. Indeed, our first fact-check of that claim was in February 2010 -- nearly two years ago.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 20, 2011 10:20 PM GMT
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/post/the-problem-for-the-fact-checkers/2011/08/25/gIQAMXxi7O_blog.htmlSteve Benen, Paul Krugman, and others speculate that PolitiFact’s decision to choose a claim associated with Democrats as ‘Lie of the Year’ was a tacit answer to these attacks. ‘See? We’re not liberal! We’re defending Paul Ryan!’ If they had chosen one of their other Lie of the Year contenders — for instance, the claim that the stimulus created “zero” jobs — they might have lost the right forever.

    And that, ultimately, is the problem with the fact checker model. They have no actual power, so their only influence comes from the public’s sense of their legitimacy. And about half of the public leans towards one party and about half of the public leans toward the other. That means PolitiFact and these other outlets need to find some uneasy balance between the parties, too. But that just means the parties will have plenty of opportunities to decide that these are hackish, partisan operations. Conservatives got there a few weeks ago, and now liberals are following.

    The likely result is that these outlets will be listened to when one side or the other finds it convenient and ignored otherwise. Rather than policing the political discourse, they’ll just become one more bludgeon within it.

    Call it the Ryan problem: Ryan actually campaigned to get PolitiFact to name “end Medicare” their Lie of the Year. And yet Ryan is one of the prime offenders behind the 2010 Lie of the Year — that the Affordable Care Act was a “government takeover” of the health-care system. But Ryan hasn’t apologized for those comments or even, as far as I can tell, stopped making that argument. He wants PolitiFact on his side when it’s useful for him, and he’ll ignore the outlet when it isn’t.