Stanford researchers: Nanoparticle electrode for batteries could make large-scale power storage on the energy grid feasible

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    Dec 04, 2011 2:19 PM GMT
    http://news.stanford.edu/news/2011/november/longlife-power-storage-112311.html

    Stanford researchers have used nanoparticles of a copper compound to develop a high-power battery electrode that is so inexpensive to make, so efficient and so durable that it could be used to build batteries big enough for economical large-scale energy storage on the electrical grid – something researchers have sought for years.

    The sun doesn't always shine and the breeze doesn't always blow and therein lie perhaps the biggest hurdles to making wind and solar power usable on a grand scale. If only there were an efficient, durable, high-power, rechargeable battery we could use to store large quantities of excess power generated on windy or sunny days until we needed it. And as long as we're fantasizing, let's imagine the battery is cheap to build, too.

    Now Stanford researchers have developed part of that dream battery, a new electrode that employs crystalline nanoparticles of a copper compound.

    In laboratory tests, the electrode survived 40,000 cycles of charging and discharging, after which it could still be charged to more than 80 percent of its original charge capacity. For comparison, the average lithium ion battery can handle about 400 charge/discharge cycles before it deteriorates too much to be of practical use.

    "At a rate of several cycles per day, this electrode would have a good 30 years of useful life on the electrical grid," said Colin Wessells, a graduate student in materials science and engineering who is the lead author of a paper describing the research, published this week in Nature Communications.

    "That is a breakthrough performance – a battery that will keep running for tens of thousands of cycles and never fail," said Yi Cui, an associate professor of materials science and engineering, who is Wessell's adviser and a coauthor of the paper.

    The electrode's durability derives from the atomic structure of the crystalline copper hexacyanoferrate used to make it. The crystals have an open framework that allows ions – electrically charged particles whose movements en masse either charge or discharge a battery – to easily go in and out without damaging the electrode. Most batteries fail because of accumulated damage to an electrode's crystal structure.

    Because the ions can move so freely, the electrode's cycle of charging and discharging is extremely fast, which is important because the power you get out of a battery is proportional to how fast you can discharge the electrode.

    To maximize the benefit of the open structure, the researchers needed to use the right size ions. Too big and the ions would tend to get stuck and could damage the crystal structure when they moved in and out of the electrode. Too small and they might end up sticking to one side of the open spaces between atoms, instead of easily passing through. The right-sized ion turned out to be hydrated potassium, a much better fit compared with other hydrated ions such as sodium and lithium.

    "It fits perfectly – really, really nicely," said Cui. "Potassium will just zoom in and zoom out, so you can have an extremely high-power battery."

    The speed of the electrode is further enhanced because the particles of electrode material that Wessell synthesized are tiny even by nanoparticle standards – a mere 100 atoms across.

    Those modest dimensions mean the ions don't have to travel very far into the electrode to react with active sites in a particle to charge the electrode to its maximum capacity, or to get back out during discharge.
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    Dec 04, 2011 7:22 PM GMT
    this thing will be in everything once it gets to production
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    Dec 04, 2011 9:11 PM GMT
    It's interesting, but they've only built an electrode, not a full battery yet. There are still some hurdles, as there always are to these exciting discoveries.
  • FRE0

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    Dec 04, 2011 9:19 PM GMT
    That' good news if it turns out to be practical under real operating conditions. Even if it doesn't make renewable sources of energy practical and economical, it would improve the efficiency of currently available energy sources by reducing load variations thereby reducing the need for spinning reserve.
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    Dec 04, 2011 9:22 PM GMT
    now if i can learn how to make my own..i can hook it in series with my DIY wind generator and gather the energy...run it thru my invertor and power up an item or 2 around my house.i have already done the zinc/oxygen fuel cells..pretty cool......potassium ion makes sense..it has one of the largest atoms in the alkali family..