This Man Had His Thumb Replaced By His Toe

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    Dec 05, 2011 5:02 PM GMT
    c73132c7b07314c717d5b9d23cf9fb92.jpg

    James Byrne was doing some carpentry work when he cut his left thumb. Doctors tried to unsuccessfully re-attach it, so they proposed an alternative: "Why don't we use your dominant left toe instead?" He said yes.

    But why would you want to have a huge toe instead of leaving your hand as it is? Wouldn't you rather have nothing at all and tell people that you lost it fighting with a pack of vicious hyenas than having a big ass toe on your hand? Apparently, James' thumb was vital for his work, paver and plant operator, so the answer was easy for him.

    The operation was a success, although he still can't fully move the thumb naturally: "I can't bend it yet but I hope to be able to do so soon. It rotates and I can give it a good wiggle. I am so, so pleased that I had it done. It is just such a relief that I'll be able to get back to work soon." He would have to return to surgery to remove the wires that currently secure the bones in place, but otherwise everything seems perfectly fine.

    He says that some people find it disgusting and others find it funny. As long as it works, who cares.


    "I'm gonna finger you, i mean toe you"

    "WHATTTTTT"

  • masculumpedes

    Posts: 5549

    Dec 05, 2011 7:09 PM GMT
    While I understand that he needed both hands for his work, I have always heard that upon losing a toe, you have to learn to walk all over again because it upsets your balance. icon_confused.gif
  • NerdLifter

    Posts: 1509

    Dec 05, 2011 7:11 PM GMT
    This is why I hate using power saws: scared something like this will happen. I saw a kid nearly slice off his hand in the woodwork shop in the engineering labs due to lack of adequate staffing and instruction.
  • commoncoll

    Posts: 1222

    Dec 05, 2011 7:29 PM GMT
    malefeet saidWhile I understand that he needed both hands for his work, I have always heard that upon losing a toe, you have to learn to walk all over again because it upsets your balance. icon_confused.gif

    No. He will of course have to learn to function without a body part that was there before, but general everyday walking is fine. He won't be able to run as well or walk as fast. Shoes also help balance.

    You walk on the ball and heel of your foot, not your toes. You can test this by simply lifting your great toe off the floor as you walk. You toes help give you agility and pivoting and reduce force of floor on the ball of the foot. He still has four toes left.
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    Dec 05, 2011 8:26 PM GMT
    They've got these newer table saws that are supposed to stop on contact with flesh. I've never seen on in person though. They don't seem to be catching on very fast.

  • masculumpedes

    Posts: 5549

    Dec 05, 2011 8:27 PM GMT
    A little bit of foot trivia: You can see that this man is among the small percentage of people whose fingernail shape also matches the shape of their toenails. icon_wink.gif
  • RSportsguy

    Posts: 1925

    Dec 05, 2011 9:49 PM GMT
    malefeet saidA little bit of foot trivia: You can see that this man is among the small percentage of people whose fingernail shape also matches the shape of their toenails. icon_wink.gif


    Thanks for the fun foot fact!! (easier to type than to say)!! icon_wink.gif
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    Dec 05, 2011 10:00 PM GMT
    If something like this happened to me (which is one of my worst fears), I would totally consider doing the same thing. As a pianist, I NEED all my fingers...lol. I know I would never have the same dexterity again, but at least I'd be able to reach those octaves! icon_cool.gif
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    Dec 05, 2011 10:12 PM GMT
    When the nerves controlling my right thumb died, a surgeon offered to rearrange all the tendons in my hand - in effect, kill off my little finger in hopes that I'd eventually learn to control my thumb. It just seemed too creepy. And the surgeon seemed just a little too eager. (Especially considering they'd already done the wrong surgery on it once.)

    Also, fortuitously, the right thumb is the only finger not needed to play woodwinds. Which I still thought I'd continue to do at that point.

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    Dec 05, 2011 11:11 PM GMT
    at least they didn't have 2 replace his dick w/ his thumb.
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    Dec 05, 2011 11:16 PM GMT
    Yeah, I think I'd rather tell people I lost it fighting with a pack of vicious hyenas than having a big ass toe on my hand, but that's just me. icon_neutral.gif
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    Dec 05, 2011 11:27 PM GMT
    The foot fetish hits a speed bump!
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    Dec 05, 2011 11:35 PM GMT
    It doesn't have to be the big toe; it can be the second toe instead. And usually, the big toe gets a bit debulked so it doesn't look so...toe-ish.

    Fun operation though icon_smile.gif
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    Dec 05, 2011 11:43 PM GMT
    ingenious84 saidIf something like this happened to me (which is one of my worst fears), I would totally consider doing the same thing. As a pianist, I NEED all my fingers...lol. I know I would never have the same dexterity again, but at least I'd be able to reach those octaves! icon_cool.gif


    Yeah, I would finally be able to do a 14 note span without Rach's genes. Plus those really difficult 2-note consecutive runs (there's a passage in Prok's 3rd PC that I cannot play):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=_AdBi5IBrto#t=453s
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    Dec 06, 2011 3:21 AM GMT
    ingenious84 saidIf something like this happened to me (which is one of my worst fears), I would totally consider doing the same thing. As a pianist, I NEED all my fingers...lol. I know I would never have the same dexterity again, but at least I'd be able to reach those octaves! icon_cool.gif


    hot guy who play instrument, so hot icon_redface.gif
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    Dec 06, 2011 3:56 AM GMT
    OMFG! LMFAO!!!! icon_lol.gif
  • Sparkycat

    Posts: 1064

    Dec 06, 2011 4:39 AM GMT
    Just wait until he tries to find a pair of gloves that fit. Then he won't feel like such a smart guy.
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    Dec 06, 2011 8:18 AM GMT
    Aw, poor guy. I've seen some guys who manage without a thumb though. I can't imagine it to be easy.

    Don't you use your big toe to balance though? No he has an awkward hand and off-keelter balance. I would rather just have the one problem with being thumbless than the two problems he now has.
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    Dec 06, 2011 10:13 AM GMT
    I've met a few people that have had this procedure done and the first time shaking a customer's hand and noticing a big toe where a thumb should have been was alarming for me and awkward for us both. Since then it really doesn't faze me when I see such things. Most of the jobs I've had have been in industrial settings and am quite fortunate not to have lost any digits or limbs in the accidents I've been involved in. There wouldn't be any issue with a toe to thumb transplant if it meant regaining partial or full function of that hand however I'm sure the customers I cater to would be a little weirded out if I were to pour them a drink and stir their cocktail with the hand that has the transplant. LOL.
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    Dec 06, 2011 10:25 PM GMT
    The guy is also married.
    It makes me wonder how his wife must feel, when in bed, he strokes her upper arm with his left hand in gentle affection, knowing what she is feeling on her skin was once part of his foot.