Deadlifts

  • trl_

    Posts: 994

    Dec 06, 2011 4:49 AM GMT
    Ive been trying deadlifts recently. I want to make sure this is normal: the muscles in my lower back are worked more than my legs and butt. That sounds completely wrong, but could this be possible if i have a weaker lower back to begin with? Or should i only be feeling deadlifts in my legs?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 06, 2011 5:48 AM GMT
    well technically deadlifts are a hamstring/glute exercise, however if your lower back is weak then you can feel it there if you can't maintain proper form and your back isn't remaining perfectly still during the movement.

    I'd suggest lowering the weight, focusing on form and doing more core work (planks and such)
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Dec 06, 2011 2:45 PM GMT
    your lower back is an odd amalgam of muscles, highlighted by the transverse abdomonis and the psoas. your transverse is one of your four abs, and they connect the front of you to your back. this is what people mean when they say you might have weak abs if you have back pain. you should always engage your abs when working out to stabilize your core, especially in a deadlift. so it could be you just have weak (back) abs if you neglect to work them out.

    your psoas is probably the most underappreaciated muscle in your body. it connects your upper body to the lower body and inserts at the (thoracic if memory serves right at T2 and T3) spine. because it is often neglected in people, it can be easily stressed and fatigued when engaged heavily, as in a deadlift.
  • bad_wolf

    Posts: 1002

    Dec 06, 2011 2:51 PM GMT
    To reinforce the back so you can progress with the hamstrings, try lateral raises on a swiss ball (like a reverse ab curl). Blast out as many as you can in the minute and also mix in a 'back to the left' and 'back to the right'.

    They also handy before ab exercises as well.

    lower_back_workout_1_195_16.jpglower_back_workout_1_194_16.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 06, 2011 2:55 PM GMT
    im scared the death to do them. I can see my back being wrenched so easily.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 06, 2011 3:05 PM GMT
    Deadlifts are my favorite lifts icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 06, 2011 3:37 PM GMT
    well said. i suggest working on your core and lowering the weight.

    calibro saidyour lower back is an odd amalgam of muscles, highlighted by the transverse abdomonis and the psoas. your transverse is one of your four abs, and they connect the front of you to your back. this is what people mean when they say you might have weak abs if you have back pain. you should always engage your abs when working out to stabilize your core, especially in a deadlift. so it could be you just have weak (back) abs if you neglect to work them out.

    your psoas is probably the most underappreaciated muscle in your body. it connects your upper body to the lower body and inserts at the (thoracic if memory serves right at T2 and T3) spine. because it is often neglected in people, it can be easily stressed and fatigued when engaged heavily, as in a deadlift.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 08, 2011 2:28 AM GMT
    trl_ saidIve been trying deadlifts recently. I want to make sure this is normal: the muscles in my lower back are worked more than my legs and butt. That sounds completely wrong, but could this be possible if i have a weaker lower back to begin with? Or should i only be feeling deadlifts in my legs?


    That is normal. The deadlift works your lower back a lot. It's also one of the best exercises you can do, as it works so many muscles at once.

    Just remember to keep your back flat when you're lifting and your chest up. You don't want to round your back when you're doing them. If you can't keep your back flat, you might have to lower the weight and work your way up from there.

    Here's a fantastic guide I just read yesterday, actually, about proper form.

    http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/are_you_ignorant_when_it_comes_to_the_deadlift
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 08, 2011 3:10 AM GMT
    trl_ saidIve been trying deadlifts recently. I want to make sure this is normal: the muscles in my lower back are worked more than my legs and butt. That sounds completely wrong, but could this be possible if i have a weaker lower back to begin with? Or should i only be feeling deadlifts in my legs?


    there are two general types of deadlifts: 1. a "pushing" deadlift, where you are primarily engaging quads, and 2. a "pulling" deadlift (straight-leg) where you are primarily engaging hamstrings. my first question to you is what type are you performing?

    the second question i would ask, is could you possibly qualify what you mean by "worked more"? are you feeling pain in your low back, or is it fatigue?

    if it is fatigue, then that would seem to be indicative that your lumbar is simply weak, and is in the process of becoming stronger. even though your lumbar area isn't primarily involved with the movement, it still has to stabilize and support the spine. holding the weight in your hands requires the spine to be properly aligned so the weight you hold can be transferred down through your legs. hold your spine in proper alignment when holding a weight is enough to fatigue it, which is perfectly normal.

    in either type of deadlift, the axis of rotation needs to be your hip and NOT your lumbar spine. the scapula need to be retracted and the rest of the spine straight relative to itself. this is a harsh lesson that took me years to learn, and i learned it the hard way. i screwed up my lumbar because of improper technique, at it took me YEARS to attempt to deadlift again because i was so freaked out by them. but now i know what i'm doing, i LOVE deadlifts (both types) and i make my clients do them when they are ready to do so. deadlifts are just an awesome exercise, and there are some great variations of them, once your body is ready. if you want to know more about them, just send an email to me or something.


  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    Dec 08, 2011 3:29 AM GMT
    trl_ saidIve been trying deadlifts recently. I want to make sure this is normal: the muscles in my lower back are worked more than my legs and butt. That sounds completely wrong, but could this be possible if i have a weaker lower back to begin with? Or should i only be feeling deadlifts in my legs?
    First of all, deadlifts are a advance exercise. If you are not sure how to do them. I would suggest getting yourself a personal trainer. If not go on youtube and enter in how to perform a deadlift. Look at more than one because not everyone knows how to perform a proper deadlift. I wanted correct you on your lower back theory. In theory your lower is not be use to do anything other than shock absorbing and stabilizing. Whenever you are doing lifting if should all be done with your legs. If you are feeling pressure in your lower back. Than you are probably doing it wrong. If you want to strengthen your lower back than do hyper extensions. I am glad you are trying to do them but I suggest you get a good trainer or just go on youtube.
  • trl_

    Posts: 994

    Dec 11, 2011 10:48 PM GMT
    Cogitor said

    there are two general types of deadlifts: 1. a "pushing" deadlift, where you are primarily engaging quads, and 2. a "pulling" deadlift (straight-leg) where you are primarily engaging hamstrings. my first question to you is what type are you performing?


    #1, pushing.

    Cogitor said the second question i would ask, is could you possibly qualify what you mean by "worked more"? are you feeling pain in your low back, or is it fatigue?


    not pain, fatigue. i don't feel any pain from any of the exercises i'm doing. but my lower back is more tight and sore from deadlifts than any other muscle area.

    Cogitor saidif it is fatigue, then that would seem to be indicative that your lumbar is simply weak, and is in the process of becoming stronger. even though your lumbar area isn't primarily involved with the movement, it still has to stabilize and support the spine. holding the weight in your hands requires the spine to be properly aligned so the weight you hold can be transferred down through your legs. hold your spine in proper alignment when holding a weight is enough to fatigue it, which is perfectly normal.

    in either type of deadlift, the axis of rotation needs to be your hip and NOT your lumbar spine. the scapula need to be retracted and the rest of the spine straight relative to itself. this is a harsh lesson that took me years to learn, and i learned it the hard way. i screwed up my lumbar because of improper technique, at it took me YEARS to attempt to deadlift again because i was so freaked out by them. but now i know what i'm doing, i LOVE deadlifts (both types) and i make my clients do them when they are ready to do so. deadlifts are just an awesome exercise, and there are some great variations of them, once your body is ready. if you want to know more about them, just send an email to me or something.


    thanks for that. i really like deadlifts so far, but i'm still trying to make sure i have my form right since i'm paranoid about ruining my back and they seem complicated.
  • trl_

    Posts: 994

    Dec 11, 2011 10:51 PM GMT
    tuffguyndc said
    trl_ saidIve been trying deadlifts recently. I want to make sure this is normal: the muscles in my lower back are worked more than my legs and butt. That sounds completely wrong, but could this be possible if i have a weaker lower back to begin with? Or should i only be feeling deadlifts in my legs?
    First of all, deadlifts are a advance exercise. If you are not sure how to do them. I would suggest getting yourself a personal trainer. If not go on youtube and enter in how to perform a deadlift. Look at more than one because not everyone knows how to perform a proper deadlift. I wanted correct you on your lower back theory. In theory your lower is not be use to do anything other than shock absorbing and stabilizing. Whenever you are doing lifting if should all be done with your legs. If you are feeling pressure in your lower back. Than you are probably doing it wrong. If you want to strengthen your lower back than do hyper extensions. I am glad you are trying to do them but I suggest you get a good trainer or just go on youtube.


    ok so we should never attempt something that's new or difficult. got it. lol
  • YJacket

    Posts: 146

    Dec 11, 2011 11:13 PM GMT
    Deadlifts are a back exercise, kid. The variations--Romanian or straight-legged--engage your hams more, but they primarily work your lower back.

    No idea what your routine and form are like...[insert pontification about routine and form here]...but yeah, if you're just beginning to try them, you should feel it in your lower back--and as you progress to heavier weights, you'll feel it in your back.
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    Dec 11, 2011 11:24 PM GMT
    trl_ said
    tuffguyndc said
    trl_ saidIve been trying deadlifts recently. I want to make sure this is normal: the muscles in my lower back are worked more than my legs and butt. That sounds completely wrong, but could this be possible if i have a weaker lower back to begin with? Or should i only be feeling deadlifts in my legs?
    First of all, deadlifts are a advance exercise. If you are not sure how to do them. I would suggest getting yourself a personal trainer. If not go on youtube and enter in how to perform a deadlift. Look at more than one because not everyone knows how to perform a proper deadlift. I wanted correct you on your lower back theory. In theory your lower is not be use to do anything other than shock absorbing and stabilizing. Whenever you are doing lifting if should all be done with your legs. If you are feeling pressure in your lower back. Than you are probably doing it wrong. If you want to strengthen your lower back than do hyper extensions. I am glad you are trying to do them but I suggest you get a good trainer or just go on youtube.


    ok so we should never attempt something that's new or difficult. got it. lol

    now you are coming off as being condescending or ignorant. what i am saying is that when you are trying something new. especially if it is something you can seriously injure yourself doing. I suggest taking a lesson on how to do it before you do it.
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    Dec 11, 2011 11:25 PM GMT
    YJacket saidDeadlifts are a back exercise, kid. The variations--Romanian or straight-legged--engage your hams more, but they primarily work your lower back.

    No idea what your routine and form are like...[insert pontification about routine and form here]...but yeah, if you're just beginning to try them, you should feel it in your lower back--and as you progress to heavier weights, you'll feel it in your back.
    dude, deadlifts are not a back exercise. they are a glute and hamstring exercise neither of which does not include your back. this is why you get a trainer or talk to a trainer rather than listen to someone who may or may not know what they are talking about
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 11, 2011 11:36 PM GMT
    tuffguyndc said
    YJacket saidDeadlifts are a back exercise, kid. The variations--Romanian or straight-legged--engage your hams more, but they primarily work your lower back.

    No idea what your routine and form are like...[insert pontification about routine and form here]...but yeah, if you're just beginning to try them, you should feel it in your lower back--and as you progress to heavier weights, you'll feel it in your back.
    dude, deadlifts are not a back exercise. they are a glute and hamstring exercise neither of which does not include your back. this is why you get a trainer or talk to a trainer rather than listen to someone who may or may not know what they are talking about



    Greaat advice. I will ask a trainer at the gym for some assistance. i always work my bad even when i think my form is good. i mean how far should i be arching my back..
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    Dec 11, 2011 11:40 PM GMT
    Aggieboy said
    tuffguyndc said
    YJacket saidDeadlifts are a back exercise, kid. The variations--Romanian or straight-legged--engage your hams more, but they primarily work your lower back.

    No idea what your routine and form are like...[insert pontification about routine and form here]...but yeah, if you're just beginning to try them, you should feel it in your lower back--and as you progress to heavier weights, you'll feel it in your back.
    dude, deadlifts are not a back exercise. they are a glute and hamstring exercise neither of which does not include your back. this is why you get a trainer or talk to a trainer rather than listen to someone who may or may not know what they are talking about



    Greaat advice. I will ask a trainer at the gym for some assistance. i always work my bad even when i think my form is good. i mean how far should i be arching my back..
    you should never arch your back when doing deadlifts. your back should be flat. definitely talk with a personal trainer. if not look it up on youtube.
  • YJacket

    Posts: 146

    Dec 11, 2011 11:43 PM GMT
    Again, deadlifts are a back exercise. The exercise has been around before people started giving a damn about working ``glutes.''

    Find an Olympic lifter or powerlifter that says he deadlifts to strengthen his fucking glutes, and I'll yield my position.

    As I said, variations of the dead target the hamstrings moreso. All primarily work the back.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 12, 2011 12:08 AM GMT
    Man, just go lightly with deadlifts. If done incorrectly you could end up with a herniated disc (most probably at the L4/L5 vertebra) which affect nerves leading to your legs - very painful. Then, surgery and/or physiotherapy will be the only solutions to a very painful problem.
  • dc415

    Posts: 255

    Dec 12, 2011 12:33 AM GMT
    YJacket saidAgain, deadlifts are a back exercise. The exercise has been around before people started giving a damn about working ``glutes.''

    Find an Olympic lifter or powerlifter that says he deadlifts to strengthen his fucking glutes, and I'll yield my position.

    As I said, variations of the dead target the hamstrings moreso. All primarily work the back.


    deadlifts are not a "back exercise". Deadlifts work the posterior chain, which include hamstrings, glutes, "back", etc. Calling the deadlift a back exercise is almost like calling the squat an abs exercise.

    Here's a snippet from an interview with Eric Cressey, a powerlifter:

    I've seen the deadlift called everything from a hamstrings exercise to a back exercise. How would you describe it?

    I’d call it an everything exercise! It hits the grip/forearms, upper back, mid-back, lower back, lats, glutes, hamstrings, and core stabilizers....
  • YJacket

    Posts: 146

    Dec 12, 2011 1:10 AM GMT
    dc415,

    What about the snippet (or the full interview) contradicts what I wrote, that deads primarily work the back?

    By the way, your squat-abs analogy is absurd.
  • dc415

    Posts: 255

    Dec 12, 2011 1:25 AM GMT
    YJacket saiddc415,

    What about the snippet (or the full interview) contradicts what I wrote, that deads primarily work the back?

    By the way, your squat-abs analogy is absurd.


    wow.... just... wow.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 12, 2011 3:14 AM GMT
    YJacket saidAgain, deadlifts are a back exercise. The exercise has been around before people started giving a damn about working ``glutes.''

    Find an Olympic lifter or powerlifter that says he deadlifts to strengthen his fucking glutes, and I'll yield my position.

    As I said, variations of the dead target the hamstrings moreso. All primarily work the back.


    Agreed. They are one of the best back exercises you can do. They work the back isometrically, though; that might be the source of confusion.

    But they can certainly make your back a little sore.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 12, 2011 6:37 PM GMT
    Taken from the Starting Strength Wiki...

    Deadlift

    The deadlift is a compound movement that works grip strength and the primary muscles used in the deadlift are the erector spinae, the gluteus maximus, adductor magnus, hamstrings and the soleus.

    So yes, deadlifts do work the lower back, in addition to the hams and the glutes. So if your lower back is primarily getting sore, you're right that it could be because your lower back may be weaker than your legs and is therefore struggling to keep up with your legs.