AGE vs. WEIGHT

  • cobratapout

    Posts: 4

    Jun 10, 2008 12:00 AM GMT
    I am in my early 40's and typically workout w/ guys in their mid to late 20's. These guys are generally "light weights" compared to me (I'm 210# and I'm almost always described as "muscular", esp. for my age). The two guys I workout w/ are 150# and 180#, respectively.

    One of them in particular always likes to talk about how much LIGHTER he is (he's the 150#'er) and, therefore, how "remarkable" it is that he can keep up w/ the "big dawgs"!icon_smile.gif LMAO! Anyhow, I told him that MY extra THIRTEEN years in age (an average) on him makes me that much more at a DISADVANTAGE than does his weight.

    Just wondering what anyone would have to say about whether the "weight challenged" would have any advantages/disadvantages to an "age challenged" workout partner?

    Hope this makes since. If anyone needs any clarification, just ask questions and I'll answer as best I can!icon_smile.gif

    Peace,
    cobratapout > YAHOO IM
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    Jun 10, 2008 1:24 AM GMT
    Okay LOL, it's a great question. . .

    And as someone who falls into BOTH categories. . . you've hit on something that has ALWAYS been a sore point with me.

    I'm definitely "weight-challenged," since I weigh only 145, and that's after a really heavy meal. . .

    and I suppose I'm "age-challenged" too, since I'm (gasp!) 48. . .

    and I support your "lightweight" friend. He's absolutely right.

    It IS pretty amazing when a 150 lb. guy can "keep up" when lifting weights with guys around or over 200 lbs.

    You're talking about a 40% difference in bodyweight. That's an enormous advantage when lifting.

    Sorry to rub it in, but I'd say your little buddy, pound for pound, is definitely the strongest of the three of you.

    I've worked out with lots of buds who are definitely "big boys" by any standard. . . and I've always pretty much held my own, and then some. And I've noticed the big guys rarely give much credit to us little guys. It's like they refuse to acknowledge that we can keep up with them.

    And I hope I don't sound like a jerk here. . . but I can tell you it's always entertaining when I finish with, say, the bicep machine and then the big guy behind me -- who outweighs me by AT LEAST 50 or 60 lbs. -- goes for a way lower weight, like 3 or 4 plates less.

    I'm far from the only little guy who fits this description. This is true for LOTS of "lightweight" guys.

    As far as the age thing goes. . . nah. Sorry, I don't buy it. Like I say, I'm 48 and I don't notice any difference in energy levels, etc.

    So I guess I'm saying a younger lightweight guy who lifts heavy is more impressive than an older heavyweight guy who lifts about the same.

    No offense whatsoever intended to you, Cobra. You look like a stud! I wish I was built like you! And I hope you take this in the good-natured way it is intended.

    Being sort of a little guy, I feel like we get shortchanged sometimes. The big guys, so often, seem to get so many of life's advantages. And it's like the little guys have to work three times as hard to get one-third the recognition -- and not just at the gym. So I like to see us get credit where credit is due -- and in some cases, overdue.

    Again, great question. I'd like to hear what other guys think.


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    Jun 10, 2008 2:00 AM GMT
    Why does your profile say you are 34, but in this thread you say you are in your early 40s? Is that where your "THIRTEEN years in age (an average) on him" comes from? Altho I can't see how that would average out to 13 years. HAHAHAHAHAHAHA ... icon_lol.gif
  • cobratapout

    Posts: 4

    Jun 10, 2008 3:06 AM GMT
    LittleGuyWithMuscles: No offense taken per your Post. I can understand your good natured approach to answering question totally!icon_smile.gif Thanks for your input!icon_smile.gif

    cobratapout > YAHOO IM
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    Jun 10, 2008 4:32 AM GMT
    A littler guy can often lift similar weights, e.g., "keep up" with a bigger guy because of an often overlooked benefit of shorter arms: as a third-class lever, shorter arms do offer a mechanical advantage, as in being to lift greater amounts of mass without the strain on the joints that longer limbs cause.
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    Jun 10, 2008 4:36 AM GMT
    Then, there's the strength-to-mass ratio, which is very noticeable with very tiny people: the greater the mass of the body, the greater the proportion of muscle recruited to overcome inertia.

    An ant is tremendously strong relative to its mass. An elephant is proportionately weak.
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    Jun 10, 2008 6:34 AM GMT
    mickeytopogigio saidThen, there's the strength-to-mass ratio, which is very noticeable with very tiny people: the greater the mass of the body, the greater the proportion of muscle recruited to overcome inertia.

    An ant is tremendously strong relative to its mass. An elephant is proportionately weak.


    Guys who know their physics give me a hard-on.
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    Jun 10, 2008 6:36 AM GMT
    Yeah, but skinny men ain't sexy.
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    Jun 10, 2008 6:46 AM GMT
    redheadguy saidYeah, but skinny men ain't sexy.


    The tragedy of my life! icon_cry.gif
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    Jun 10, 2008 7:17 AM GMT
    iguanaSF saidGuys who know their physics give me a hard-on.

    That's a cantilever.
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    Jun 11, 2008 3:21 AM GMT
    Mmmmmm. 100% North Carolina Beef.