Rosetta Stone

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    Dec 14, 2011 12:05 AM GMT
    if u used Rosetta Stone Greek, Level 1, I would appreciate receiving your feedback. Thanks!
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    Dec 14, 2011 3:19 AM GMT
    Actually I have before I went to Greece about 3 years ago for a holiday trip. It's reasonably good--just need to figure out the pictures' context and you can get the questions right. (I can still read some simple modern Greek now)
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    Dec 14, 2011 3:20 AM GMT
    My brother is using it to learn Spanish. He says it's good. But, he has only used it for 1 wk.
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    Dec 14, 2011 3:47 AM GMT
    ty gentlemen for your replies
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Dec 14, 2011 6:08 AM GMT
    rosetta stone is a joke.
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    Dec 14, 2011 6:09 AM GMT
    I'm using it for French. I've stopped for about 2 months because of how busy school has been, but during that time that I was using it actively, I really liked it. I really need to get back to it...
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    Dec 14, 2011 6:13 AM GMT
    Rosetta Stone works well for teaching grammar, but some of the grammatical rules you'll learn can be a little odd or not frequently used (not necessarily for Greek) and your vocabulary will be abysmal (knowing how to say phrases like "the children are jumping off the table" and "the woman is drinking milk" is not useful).

    I won't say to not do Rosetta Stone, but at least couple it with some other sort of language tool.
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    Dec 14, 2011 8:23 AM GMT
    Zettabyte saidRosetta Stone works well for teaching grammar, but some of the grammatical rules you'll learn can be a little odd or not frequently used (not necessarily for Greek) and your vocabulary will be abysmal (knowing how to say phrases like "the children are jumping off the table" and "the woman is drinking milk" is not useful).

    I won't say to not do Rosetta Stone, but at least couple it with some other sort of language tool.


    This is what I would recommend. It's ok for reinforcing some concepts in language, but your vocabulary is best expanded by talking to people who speak it. I had purchased it for Arabic Lvl 1 a few years ago, and was able to compare it to my Arabic classes in college. It's not something I would recommend as a stand alone instructional tool, but it can help reinforce stuff you learn in class.
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    Dec 14, 2011 10:12 AM GMT
    The general consensus from a thread I looked at here http://how-to-learn-any-language.com/forum/default.asp is it is useful as a sort of flash card program and can help with vocabulary, but is not by itself a good way to learn a language.
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    Dec 14, 2011 10:22 AM GMT
    I hired a Greek/Latin tutor instead.
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    Dec 14, 2011 9:01 PM GMT
    wow. ty for all the posts so far gentleman. i appreciate them.
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    Dec 14, 2011 9:09 PM GMT
    There's another program called Tell Me More that i found much more interesting than Rosetta Stone. Rosetta Stone seemed very repetitive without seeming to make much progress. Tell Me More offers a lot more diverse activities.

  • Dec 14, 2011 9:12 PM GMT
    I've been using an online program babble.com and my french is coming by a lot faster than it did with Rosetta Stone
  • BrownsTown

    Posts: 158

    Dec 14, 2011 9:13 PM GMT
    I highly, highly recommend the Pimsleur CDs. They worked for me where practically nothing else did. You can find them in the A/V dept of some larger public libraries if you want to try them out. I ended up buying my own copy.
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    Dec 14, 2011 9:22 PM GMT
    BrownsTown saidI highly, highly recommend the Pimsleur CDs. They worked for me where practically nothing else did. You can find them in the A/V dept of some larger public libraries if you want to try them out. I ended up buying my own copy.

    Agree with Pimsleur. What is convenient is to read into iTunes then onto iPod. More convenient than the CDs. Assume you own CD so no copyright issue.
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    Dec 14, 2011 9:37 PM GMT
    ty ty ty
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    Dec 14, 2011 11:44 PM GMT
    Er yeah... iPod. Headphones. I used one of those CD based programs in pre-iPod days for a crash spanish course. Played them on my car stereo. (I had zero time available to sit and study.)

    I remember pulling into a space at the grocery store with that thing playing, only to notice that cars on both sides were packed with hispanic people. Heads swiveling... WTF????
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    Dec 15, 2011 2:22 AM GMT
    From what I gather from their radio advertisements it must be great. Apparently NASA uses it to teach astronauts how to communicate with aliens.
  • Rush_

    Posts: 402

    Dec 15, 2011 2:51 AM GMT
    calibro saidrosetta stone is a joke.

    +1 Got it for Greek to brush up on mine (gotta talk to the fam back in the homeland) and the progression just didn't make much sense. They teach some weird vocab rather than things you might actually use while you're there.
  • DesireIron

    Posts: 426

    Dec 15, 2011 3:02 AM GMT
    In Rosetta Stone, you learn strictly by doing. You will be told no grammatical rules, nor will you receive any instruction in English. You start by identifying words with pictures of objects and activities. Then progress up to two word sentences...again by identifying the sentence with a picture. You will also have to type and speak. You will do this over and over until it is second nature to you. At set intervals, Rosetta Stone will direct you back to review lessons so you dont forget stuff as you progress.

    When you get done, you will function in the language, like you do in English. Spontaneously. You wont have lists of grammar rules or endings or word genders, etc in your head. You wont be scanning those rules in your head when you want to speak. You will say the right thing just because it will sound right to you.
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    Dec 15, 2011 3:06 AM GMT
    I've used it for Spanish and it is really great. Well worth the money.
  • groundcombat

    Posts: 945

    Dec 15, 2011 3:19 AM GMT
    CHRISTOPHER34 saidI've used it for Spanish and it is really great. Well worth the money.


    I don't trust people with no pictures...
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    Dec 15, 2011 4:05 AM GMT
    DesireIron saidIn Rosetta Stone, you learn strictly by doing. You will be told no grammatical rules, nor will you receive any instruction in English. You start by identifying words with pictures of objects and activities. Then progress up to two word sentences...again by identifying the sentence with a picture. You will also have to type and speak. You will do this over and over until it is second nature to you. At set intervals, Rosetta Stone will direct you back to review lessons so you dont forget stuff as you progress.

    When you get done, you will function in the language, like you do in English. Spontaneously. You wont have lists of grammar rules or endings or word genders, etc in your head. You wont be scanning those rules in your head when you want to speak. You will say the right thing just because it will sound right to you.


    ^This. It's not meant to be a crash course before visiting a country. It's meant to help you truly learn the language. Yes, it gets frustrating sometimes to know how to say "The cat is on the car" and not know how to say "Where is the bathroom?" But I must say that I made incredible progress in both languages that I learned with Rosetta Stone. Of course, it needs supplementation with other modalities like speaking with natives and learning explicit grammar rules (at least for me; I got frustrated when I didn't know _why_ certain word endings changed so I looked it up). But I found it very effective for my learning style. YMMV.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Dec 15, 2011 6:20 AM GMT
    EliStark said
    DesireIron saidIn Rosetta Stone, you learn strictly by doing. You will be told no grammatical rules, nor will you receive any instruction in English. You start by identifying words with pictures of objects and activities. Then progress up to two word sentences...again by identifying the sentence with a picture. You will also have to type and speak. You will do this over and over until it is second nature to you. At set intervals, Rosetta Stone will direct you back to review lessons so you dont forget stuff as you progress.

    When you get done, you will function in the language, like you do in English. Spontaneously. You wont have lists of grammar rules or endings or word genders, etc in your head. You wont be scanning those rules in your head when you want to speak. You will say the right thing just because it will sound right to you.


    ^This. It's not meant to be a crash course before visiting a country. It's meant to help you truly learn the language. Yes, it gets frustrating sometimes to know how to say "The cat is on the car" and not know how to say "Where is the bathroom?" But I must say that I made incredible progress in both languages that I learned with Rosetta Stone. Of course, it needs supplementation with other modalities like speaking with natives and learning explicit grammar rules (at least for me; I got frustrated when I didn't know _why_ certain word endings changed so I looked it up). But I found it very effective for my learning style. YMMV.


    i already spoke the language i was using in order to review (i hadn't spoken hebrew in years). the problem is so egregiously flawed on a linguistic level it's laughable. there's no sense of learning to speak spontaneously because with no grammar you're not speaking correctly. subject-verb agreement, masculine and feminine conjugations, etc... are not small things in languages. as child, our ug (universal grammar modules) sort through the complex rules of language so that we know something sounds off when we say it even if we don't know the grammatical rule for why. your ug goes away after a young age and you can't absorb a language as efficiently without instruction. having already known what they where teaching, i was shocked by what they thought they were doing and how anyone who tried to learn hebrew from this wouldn't know the first thing about how to speak the language.
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    Dec 15, 2011 6:24 AM GMT
    Rosetta Stone is OK at best. It doesn't help you construct sentences or learn how to put sentences together. I like TELLMEMORE more. It explains thing much better.