Are you British, Gay and online? Thank Alan Turing and sign this petition:

  • ytOwen

    Posts: 298

    Dec 15, 2011 7:19 PM GMT

    The gay computer pioneer, Alan Turing, was convicted of gross indecency in 1952, when homosexual acts were illegal in the UK. Two years later he killed himself by taking cynanide. As gay men who use the internet let's sign this petition for his pardon.

    To sign this petition you have to be a British Citizen.

    Here is an article from the bbc: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-16061279

    And another from the Pink Paper: http://news.pinkpaper.com/NewsStory/6552/8/12/2011/thousands-sign-petition-to-pardon-alan-turings-gross-indecency-charge.aspx

    The text of the e-petition reads:
    e-petition Grant a pardon to Alan Turing
    Responsible department: Ministry of Justice

    We ask the HM Government to grant a pardon to Alan Turing for the conviction of 'gross indecency'. In 1952, he was convicted of 'gross indecency' with another man and was forced to undergo so-called 'organo-therapy' - chemical castration. Two years later, he killed himself with cyanide, aged just 41. Alan Turing was driven to a terrible despair and early death by the nation he'd done so much to save. This remains a shame on the UK government and UK history. A pardon can go to some way to healing this damage. It may act as an apology to many of the other gay men, not as well known as Alan Turing, who were subjected to these laws.

    Here's the link: http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/23526

    We all know the internet was made to have sex.

  • ytOwen

    Posts: 298

    Dec 15, 2011 7:23 PM GMT

    Here's the link: http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/23526

    Sorry Alan!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 15, 2011 7:54 PM GMT
    I'm a cryptologist by trade, and just read a book called "Enigma," about, oddly enough, the breaking of the Enigma codes by the Allies in WW2. Alan Turing, though not the only genius to contribute to this victory (which saved countless tens of thousands of lives over the course of the war), was certainly the most prominent and courageously open homosexual of the Allied war effort.

    So, in reality, if you are British and a free citizen of something besides a Nazi Germany or a Soviet Russia, you should sign this, as should every free man if we could.

    Good luck.
  • twostroke

    Posts: 184

    Dec 15, 2011 11:16 PM GMT
    Saw a program on the story of Alain Turing. Quite an extraordinary mathematician and a very gifted person who contributed significantly to winning world war II.
    He was hard done by by the British Authorities, his homosexuality did not help of course. Tragic suicide.
    Aparently, to this day, there has been no apology for this. Tragic again!

    I wish you many signatures
  • tokugawa

    Posts: 945

    Dec 15, 2011 11:34 PM GMT
    Turing's contributions included:

    1. In 1936 he published a paper called On Computable Numbers, which is the theoretical basis for all computers.

    In answer to the question, "can all problems be solved?" Turing illustrated how a paradox, such as "this statement is false," cannot be either true or false, and therefore cannot be solved. But if a problem can be solved, Turing's proposed computer could solve it. Turing's theoretical computer was comprised of the following components:

    a. An infinite tape,
    b. A read-write head, which can write the equivalent of a 'one' or a 'zero' on the tape, and which can read the one or zero. (All computers use binary arithmetic to do computations.)
    c. A set of instructions (which can read in the ones and zeros on the tape until a match, like '011000101' if found. When the match is found, the instruction is executed.)

    2. The development of one of the world's first computers, whose sole purpose was to crack the German codes produced by the Enigma machine. This was not a general purpose computer, like the ENIAC constructed at the University of Pennsylvania by John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert.

    The success of Turing's computer turned the tide of the battle of the Atlantic. In 1942, German U-Boats sank more tonnage that Allied shipyards were able to construct; but by the end of the war, over 90% of German U-Boats had been destroyed.

    The Nazis never caught on that their codes had been compromised, because of the astronomical number of combinations Enigma could produce. Without a computer, it would take 1,000's of years to break the code. The Germans believed that spies were stealing the information.

    According to Winston Churchill, Turing made the single biggest contribution to Allied victory in the war against Nazi Germany.

    See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing
  • tokugawa

    Posts: 945

    Dec 15, 2011 11:38 PM GMT
    twostroke saidSaw a program on the story of Alain Turing. Quite an extraordinary mathematician and a very gifted person who contributed significantly to winning world war II.
    He was hard done by by the British Authorities, his homosexuality did not help of course. Tragic suicide.
    Aparently, to this day, there has been no apology for this. Tragic again!

    I wish you many signatures


    There was a very belated apology by the British government:

    "In 2009 thousands of people signed a Downing Street petition calling for a posthumous government apology to Turing.

    "The then prime minister Gordon Brown responded by saying he was sorry for the "appalling" way Turing was treated for being gay.

    "The new petition said that "Alan Turing was driven to a terrible despair and early death by the nation he'd done so much to save".

    source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-16061279
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 15, 2011 11:56 PM GMT
    hang on... cant you also sign if you're just a uk resident and not a citizen?
  • ytOwen

    Posts: 298

    Dec 16, 2011 12:25 AM GMT
    sitr7 saidhang on... cant you also sign if you're just a uk resident and not a citizen?


    Good point! Thank you!

    To create or sign an e-petition, you must be either:

    a British citizen
    a resident in the UK (you normally live in the UK)

    http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/terms-and-conditions

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 16, 2011 12:31 AM GMT
    Done!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 16, 2011 12:36 AM GMT
    done too! im not british, but this has very little to do with being of any nationality.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 16, 2011 1:02 AM GMT
    Done.....apparently following WW2, with Britain bankrupt and on it's knees, it decided to give Turing (and other's work) to the USA, absolute free.

    Well done, really well done, I feel we played a financial blinder there.icon_rolleyes.gif
  • tokugawa

    Posts: 945

    Dec 16, 2011 10:51 PM GMT
    cyclonesurvivor saidDone.....apparently following WW2, with Britain bankrupt and on it's knees, it decided to give Turing (and other's work) to the USA, absolute free.


    Britain's financial problems after World War II contributed to the downfall of their empire, but (unlike some other countries) they paid all of their debts to the Americans. The United Kingdom did not officially go 'bankrupt,' unlike Argentina, which did default on its government debt.

    Besides collaberation with the U.S. on computers, British scientists also made contributions which led to the success of the Manhatten project; that is how they acquired the atomic bomb.

    Turing's seminal research, providing the theoritical basis for all computers, was published in November, 1936 in the "Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society." Entitled "On computable numbers, with an application to the Entscheidungsproblem," anyone could purchase a copy of the journal, or access it at a library.

    Turing's paper is available on the internet at:

    http://www.cs.ox.ac.uk/activities/ieg/e-library/sources/tp2-ie.pdf

    Software to read .pdf files, Adobe Reader X, is required. Available at no cost, it's available from Adobe's web site at:

    http://get.adobe.com/reader/

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 16, 2011 11:05 PM GMT
    Done!
  • ytOwen

    Posts: 298

    Dec 16, 2011 11:39 PM GMT
    I'm delighted with quality of the comments being made on this posting. Thanks guys!
  • ytOwen

    Posts: 298

    Dec 19, 2011 6:37 AM GMT
    18,991 signatures, 81,009 needed, sign, then pass it on.