Resume Help

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 18, 2011 10:48 PM GMT
    Okay guys I'm working on my resume for some summer internships. I am just curious as if you should really include an objective in it. I mean they obviously know that you want the job you are applying for.
    I'm doing
    Skills
    Experience
    Education
    Awards

    Should I alter any of the 4 or include any others.

    Thanks for any comments.
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    Dec 18, 2011 10:57 PM GMT
    I think it depends on the industry and the type of job you're applying for, but Objectives are a bit antiquated. You're better off writing your "objective" in a cover letter. Assuming the job you're applying for asks for one.

    Also, the style of resume depends on your experience. If you're just out of school and starting out, you obviously want to emphasize your education and skills. Then move into any previous experience, whether it's paid or internship or personal projects. Then awards, affiliations, campus clubs, and so on.
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    Dec 18, 2011 11:11 PM GMT
    Your objective is to find a summer internship position in your career field. I don't think that needs to be on the resume, but I agree that you can put it into your cover letter.

    For an internship resume, I'd include any recognized projects that you've done that are relevant to the job you're seeking -- not something for a class, but something organized and notable. For example, if you participated in a Capstone project, or a robotics competition, or you offer tax consulting, etc. Things like this are important to a potential employer because it shows that you are interested in the work.

    I wouldn't expect a lot in your Experience section, given your age. If your only experience so far is something like waiting on tables, I would keep that section very brief unless that's relevant to the job you want.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 18, 2011 11:14 PM GMT
    you should not have an objective
    you *should* have:

    Highlights of Qualifications (this can include your awards if you feel they are relevant to the position you are applying for)
    Relevant Skills
    Work History
    Education & Training

    Max 2 pages and that's it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 18, 2011 11:15 PM GMT
    Be careful disclosing too much, try to be as vague as possible. I never identify my frat by letters (since it has a poor national reputation for drinkin' and rapin') but can disguise it ... I had leadership experience and now alumni involvement so I don't want to lose it, but don't necessarily want to call too much attention to it either. If not in a frat, the same thing goes for political and religious affiliations, it can likely hurt more than it will help.

    Objectives are useful since it gives a quick snapshot of your precise, concise, technical writing. I would personally leave it in unless your work background, major, and volunteer experience make it totally clear that you have wanted this position since the day you were born.

    Otherwise: good luck with it. It is a rough market. Stay optimistic icon_biggrin.gif
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    Dec 18, 2011 11:31 PM GMT
    No matter what you include, have someone proof-read it. Or, print the resume off first, do something else, and then look at it with a fresh pair of eyes. The last thing you want is someone shoving your resume in the recycle bin or bottom of the pile if you can't spell or make grammatical sense.
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    Dec 18, 2011 11:36 PM GMT
    carnut saidNo matter what you include, have someone proof-read it. Or, print the resume off first, do something else, and then look at it with a fresh pair of eyes. The last thing you want is someone shoving your resume in the recycle bin or bottom of the pile if you can't spell or make grammatical sense.


    ^ yes.

    cover page = 1 page.
    resume = 1 page.

    too much excess = circular file.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 18, 2011 11:37 PM GMT
    Objective: Available on request.
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    Dec 18, 2011 11:39 PM GMT
    Also, use bullet points to highlight your experience/qualifications. I've had to do some interviews recently and I saw a few awful resumes. Just blocks of text, all about nothing. Buzzwords and fluff was all I saw. Managers can see through the bullshit. So try not to go overboard with selling yourself.
  • a303guy

    Posts: 829

    Dec 18, 2011 11:40 PM GMT
    carnut saidNo matter what you include, have someone proof-read it. Or, print the resume off first, do something else, and then look at it with a fresh pair of eyes. The last thing you want is someone shoving your resume in the recycle bin or bottom of the pile if you can't spell or make grammatical sense.


    best advice ever. (well, on this topic anyway...)

    As a guy that sees a lot of resumes every year (well over 100 this season alone) I have to cut through the crap pretty quick - resumes that show obvious and easy to correct typos and just basic formatting goofs are virtually guaranteed to get placed in the circular file.

    The other HUGE gripe that I have is people who send me their resume as a word.doc!! This is just about the dumbest thing ever.
    Always, always, always send your resume as a pdf - for 4 good reasons:
    1: no viruses (sending a prospective employer an infected document is a sure fire way to get called....for all the wrong reasons)
    2: its YOUR information - why send it to someone that could change it?
    3: a pdf is often, depending on your formatting, a much smaller and easier to send document size.
    4: depending on the employers setup, sometimes your formatting in Word is lost when either on-screen or when printed, and your resume winds up looking like crap.
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    Dec 19, 2011 1:05 AM GMT
    The best thing you can do is throw out that tired old format that everyone has been taught is "the way" to write a resume. Instead put something down on paper (or more likely, PDF) that gives a prospective employer a good sense of who you are, what you can do for them, and why you're a better candidate for the job than the other 100 people whose resumes they'll be looking at.

    I'm hiring for a couple of positions right now and it gets very tedious to see so many resumes that all look alike, all say about the same thing, and none of them give you any sense of the person. They're sterile.

    Employers want to know not only that you're competent to do the job, but also whether you're a good fit for their environment. So put your personality into your resume. You won't be the right fit for every environment, but when you are the employer will be able to see it and it's likely to land you an interview, which is the point of a resume.

    Another thing, clean up your social media accounts if there's anything on there you wouldn't want a potential employer seeing, because believe me they will look for it.
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    Dec 19, 2011 1:15 AM GMT
    I think the PDF vs Word attachment thing can go either way so I would ask the the representative handling your resume if they have a preference. PDF's can have complications too, depending on how the managers send/receive resumes.

    BUT I would highly recommend that you always use PDF format when submitting your resume through a 3rd Party/Staffing Agency. They are known for adding crap and editing your resume before sending to me and my hiring managers, thinking that they know what we are looking for.

    Also, BULLETS are key.

    a303guy said
    carnut saidNo matter what you include, have someone proof-read it. Or, print the resume off first, do something else, and then look at it with a fresh pair of eyes. The last thing you want is someone shoving your resume in the recycle bin or bottom of the pile if you can't spell or make grammatical sense.


    best advice ever. (well, on this topic anyway...)

    As a guy that sees a lot of resumes every year (well over 100 this season alone) I have to cut through the crap pretty quick - resumes that show obvious and easy to correct typos and just basic formatting goofs are virtually guaranteed to get placed in the circular file.

    The other HUGE gripe that I have is people who send me their resume as a word.doc!! This is just about the dumbest thing ever.
    Always, always, always send your resume as a pdf - for 4 good reasons:
    1: no viruses (sending a prospective employer an infected document is a sure fire way to get called....for all the wrong reasons)
    2: its YOUR information - why send it to someone that could change it?
    3: a pdf is often, depending on your formatting, a much smaller and easier to send document size.
    4: depending on the employers setup, sometimes your formatting in Word is lost when either on-screen or when printed, and your resume winds up looking like crap.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 19, 2011 1:21 AM GMT
    I would include the objective at the very top. Modify it for every job you apply for. For example, I majored in accounting but looked for different types of jobs in that area so I would have a resume for each type of job such as auditor, financial analyst, etc. The one I used to get my job was "To use my extensive education and job-related experience to obtain a full time position as a financial analyst beginning immediately". Corny, but it works haha

    My order from the top down was Objective, Education, Work Experience, Honors and Activities. Education was above experience since it was my stronger area compared to work experience. Make sure to highlight your strong points and make them the most noticeable.
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    Dec 19, 2011 1:22 AM GMT
    k3l3k0 saidyou should not have an objective
    you *should* have:

    Highlights of Qualifications (this can include your awards if you feel they are relevant to the position you are applying for)
    Relevant Skills
    Work History
    Education & Training

    Max 2 pages and that's it.


    This. I never understand why people have objectives or personal statements in their resumes.

    "My objective is not to be poor and live on the street." Isn't that everyone's objective? Apart from world peace, of course...

    Oh! And maybe in your application letter state why you are interested in the position. My old research assistant got my attention in her cover letter because she matched her interest (running) to our project (drugs in sport). Everyone else wrote things like "The lab I work in is about to close so I need a job."
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    Dec 19, 2011 1:26 AM GMT
    dash_8 said
    k3l3k0 saidyou should not have an objective
    you *should* have:

    Highlights of Qualifications (this can include your awards if you feel they are relevant to the position you are applying for)
    Relevant Skills
    Work History
    Education & Training

    Max 2 pages and that's it.


    This. I never understand why people have objectives or personal statements in their resumes.

    "My objective is not to be poor and live on the street." Isn't that everyone's objective? Apart from world peace, of course...


    Eh I know objectives seem very stupid and redundant, but I have never been in a resume class or talked to an expert on resumes and had them say to NOT include an objective statement. They always say it should be the first thing they see on your resumes. In interviews or at career fairs it has always been the first thing someone looks at because they always tell me "ok so you are looking for a full-time position as an auditor" or something like that
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    Dec 19, 2011 1:53 AM GMT
    a303guy said


    The other HUGE gripe that I have is people who send me their resume as a word.doc!! This is just about the dumbest thing ever.
    Always, always, always send your resume as a pdf - for 4 good reasons:
    1: no viruses (sending a prospective employer an infected document is a sure fire way to get called....for all the wrong reasons)
    2: its YOUR information - why send it to someone that could change it?
    3: a pdf is often, depending on your formatting, a much smaller and easier to send document size.
    4: depending on the employers setup, sometimes your formatting in Word is lost when either on-screen or when printed, and your resume winds up looking like crap.


    I disagree with reasons 1, 2, and sometimes 3.

    For reason 1: PDF has thousands of holes in it that are an invitation for hackers to insert malware. Adobe broke the PDF spec by making their software so compliant at trying to interpret documents that are out of spec. This is why I get patches from Adobe on a daily basis, and it's why people spend lots of time understanding how the holes can be exploited by hackers.

    For reason 2: Using Acrobat Pro allows anyone to edit the content of a PDF and resave as a PDF. So, you shouldn't think that once you make a PDF that your information is safe from being altered.

    For reason 3: Usually, a PDF can be made smaller. Depending on whether your document uses standard fonts or not, sometimes the software making the PDF bundles the font into the document so that it will display properly on any machine. You can reduce the size of a PDF in Acrobat Pro or FoxIT by choosing to optimize your document.

    One way that you can try to protect against editing is to save your PDF as signed or certified. A signed document will register as having been edited after the document was signed if someone besides you changes it.