PARENT RECOGNITION: Name One Point Your Parent(s) Stressed Early That Made a Difference

  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jun 13, 2008 4:14 PM GMT
    Well here we are at Father's Day. Just curious as to what point (or maybe philosophy) your Dad (or mother for that matter) stressed to you early that has made a difference in your life... or what you haven't forgotten.


    For me, my parents were both pretty atuned, educated people. I'm amazed how how many things are similar on how they would evaluate the world and encouraged the same with me. A little different on personal affairs.

    I can remember my mother stressing two things as a 4 and 5 year old child: 1) Racism or bigotry was ignorance (very important to her) and 2) The importance of reading (I could read fluently by the time I was 5, but she was a teacher as well).

    And yours?

    icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 4:19 PM GMT
    My parents stressed that "the government doesn't owe you a living". I heard it a thousand times, maybe more.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 4:25 PM GMT
    John43620 saidMy parents stressed that "the government doesn't owe you a living". I heard it a thousand times, maybe more.



    Why am I not surprised! icon_razz.gif

    I can't remember my parents emphasizing anything except of course to say "please" and "thank you". WASPs are so polite.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 4:32 PM GMT
    My mama taught me that life is like a box of chocolates...

    I had to say that.

    My dad's a university professor and my mom's an artist, and as such they take slightly different approaches to life. Between them, I learned that a strong education opens doors, but you've gotta do what you're passionate about.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 4:50 PM GMT
    My dad was one of the heads of Lockheed (now retired) and my mom is a popular hostess/wife/mom. My grandparents on my mom's side were very close and helped raise me. They all advocated education, hard work, impeccable character, integrity and taught me to work and study very hard all my life. I owe everything I am to those people.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 9:02 PM GMT
    As depression era children, my parents were all about responsibility with money. They didn't have all that much, but we had a good time with what we had. They were very insistent that I put money away in my 401(k) as soon as I started working in my 20's. It didn't seem like a bit deal then, but I now know that I'm really doing pretty well financial (not really rich by any means) in that I'll be able to manage my own retirement and not be poor.

    Also, education was really important. My parents were the first to graduate from high school from both sides of their families, and I was the first to get a college degree.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 9:09 PM GMT
    My father wasnt one for many words. More rules from an early age.

    1. Alcohol is bad
    2. Sex before marriage is bad (dont do it)
    3. Do not do any drugs
    4. School is number 1
    5. When we are out in public we are representing our parents name......"Do not embarrass us"
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 9:12 PM GMT
    My Dad taught through example...

    Anything you do, give it your all...

    Laugh from the belly.
  • Salubrious

    Posts: 420

    Jun 13, 2008 9:38 PM GMT
    Sex is like a Chinese dinner: it's not over until both of you get your cookies.

    He told me that when I was 10 or something.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 10:06 PM GMT
    Jockbod48 saidThey all advocated . . . impeccable character


    Oh, so that's where the nice pecs come from.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Jun 13, 2008 10:10 PM GMT
    That my only purpose on Earth was to leave it a better place than I found it. Everything else is extra.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 10:19 PM GMT
    DCEric saidThat my only purpose on Earth was to leave it a better place than I found it. Everything else is extra.


    I'll stand by that One. It is my key rule to camping with tents, and the p[lace I live.

    But when I worked in childcare and a situation come up, and i was not sure what to do. I would think now what would mom of done. Then I did the complete opposite. it worked.

    I own my parents nothing.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Jun 13, 2008 10:22 PM GMT
    Pattison saidI'll stand by that One. It is my key rule to camping with tents, and the p[lace I live.

    But when I worked in childcare and a situation come up, and i was not sure what to do. I would think now what would mom of done. Then I did the complete opposite. it worked.

    I own my parents nothing.


    ouch.
  • Run4Life83

    Posts: 207

    Jun 13, 2008 10:22 PM GMT
    My father taught me the value of hard work and determination, cliche I know, but its true. This man has worked to open the doors that he has, never once taking anything for granted.

    My grandmother on my mom's side has always told me 'Anyone who tells you to shoot for the moon is only holding you back because you belong among the stars.'
  • Koaa2

    Posts: 1556

    Jun 13, 2008 10:24 PM GMT
    My Dad always told me to marry for money and a big cock!
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Jun 13, 2008 10:38 PM GMT
    My parents were WASPs too, but they were still able to stress a few things:

    1) It's much better to earn something than to be given it.
    2) The path to success lies through school. (Not necessarily true for everyone, but something that was certainly stressed in my house)
    3) When you don't know something, ask rather than pretend that you do.
    4) Admit your mistakes and learn from them.
    5) Life is not fair. Don't expect it to be. But that doesn't excuse you for not acting fairly yourself.
    6) Live below your means. That way if something goes wrong, you'll have a safety net. And if nothing goes wrong, you'll be able to retire in comfort.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 10:41 PM GMT
    Mine is a well known General,

    One time he told me this, in frustration:

    "Do you have any idea how much Napoleon had accomplished by 21!?"
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 10:50 PM GMT
    I've always kept this to myself, but I have always amused myself by thinking the following (somewhat depressing, lol) icon_question.gif

    1) Father - Taught me how to be an alcoholic
    2) Mother - taught me how not to share my emotions

    Truth be told, I learned the opposite in the end from the both of them, although I am still working through the last bit on emotions. My father was an alcoholic and those are my memories of him (left around age 5, came back for a year around age 11; parents remarried to try and make it work). I promised myself as a little guy that I would never drink. Around age 22 I decided that alcoholism was still controlling my life, just in reverse since I avoided many social gatherings and what is clearly a lot of fun by taking extreme measures to avoid the temptation of alcohol. I drink now and don’t sense any measure of what my father went through.

    As for the emotional bit, my coming out to myself and with others (slowly) has been a great emotion experiment for me and is only doing me good. We all make mistakes and have our troubles, in the end I think I learned good thinks from my folks, even if in a kinda backwards way.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 11:00 PM GMT
    The major points MY parents stressed ???????

    Well OK, here goes.

    1) "Money is all that counts." (Odd, because for all their devotion to money, my parents never had very much of it.)

    2) "People with money are better than people who don't have money. THEY'RE JUST BETTER!!!" (My mom really said that.)

    3) "Black people are inferior to white people." (Um, you can assume the above is an extremely polite version of what they actually said. They didn't say "black" either. This sort of talk also applied to anyone who was Jewish, or any minority, or, come to think of it. . . anybody.)

    4) When I came home from 3rd grade with my report card, eleven A's with one B in music: "That's NOT all A's." (This was typical.)

    5) When I came home from college with four A's and one B: "This is NOT a good card."

    6) After graduating from school with honors: "You need to get a government job. You're not bright enough to do anything else." (Uh, no offense intended to anyone with a government job -- consider the source.)

    This isn't even one-tenth of one percent of all that I heard, and this is far, far from the worst. But it's all I can stand to write. In fact, about halfway through this, I had to get up from the computer and walk around just to let the anger pass. All these years later, and it's still so upsetting.

    If you have good parents, consider yourself enormously fortunate.

    I have GOT to stop posting in any thread labeled "parental". . .
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 13, 2008 11:05 PM GMT
    DCEric said[quote][cite]Pattison said[/cite]I'll stand by that One. It is my key rule to camping with tents, and the p[lace I live.

    But when I worked in childcare and a situation come up, and i was not sure what to do. I would think now what would mom of done. Then I did the complete opposite. it worked.

    I own my parents nothing.


    ouch.[/quote]


    The thing about the truth, is that it's not always nice, or how we want it to be. But the truth, is the truth.

    My mom should of been sterilized at birth. She is a catholic terrorist, whom raped my soul and murded my childhood. I also got punished by her catholic family for the fact that my fathers family are Lutheran Aristocrats.

    When I begged pa for help. He would just poor another beer, and tell me what an embarrassment I am!

    No I owe my parents nothing!

    Oh yet One has growen to be a productive member of society. I give to the world more than I take. I may well own mankind nothing. Yet I have dedicated the past 15 years of my life giving to mankind, and to help this world be a better place.

    I owe this to myself.

    Sorry but the truth is not always nice........
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2008 12:23 AM GMT
    Not sure how much of an influence this had, but

    When my brother and I were about 3-4 we asked our mom where we were before we were born, and without skipping a beat, she answered, "with G*d." In retrospect, though I'm openminded on the G*d question, I think that's a pretty cool answer.

    More importantly, my earliest memories are of golden warmth and love. What more could I have asked for? That has surely had an influence on this person.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2008 12:27 AM GMT
    My dad always told me not to become a lawyer as it is a one-way ticket to hell. So I decided to be a homosexual. icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Squarejaw

    Posts: 1035

    Jun 14, 2008 1:00 AM GMT
    My father taught me the world is a dangerous place and you should never take chances or try new things.

    A big theme of my life is about unlearning that one, but it's tough when it's drilled into you from birth.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2008 1:25 AM GMT
    My mom being a single mother, is and has been a crane operator for the last 20 years. That being said she has always told me I could do anything in life and to not listen to anyone when someone told me I could not do something.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 14, 2008 1:30 AM GMT
    My Dad only gave me one piece of advice in his whole life, so I shall share it with you here.

    "Anyone called Danny is bound to be a dickhead."

    I wonder if it has been a self-fulfilling prophecy because by and large, I've found this to be true!

    However, my motorbike mechanic is called Danny, and he's honest, efficient and skilled, so it can't really be relied upon in all situations.