The Employee Handbook

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    Dec 21, 2011 12:12 AM GMT
    Have you ever worked for a company that has no employee handbook or some sort of written code of ethics and rules for the company? If you have, please disregard this thread.

    If you haven't, imagine yourself as the CEO/founder of a large corporation. Every large corporation I've ever worked for (a few) had an employee handbook that explains the company objective, and lays out the "law" by which all employees must obey to remain employed. In this corporation, you wrote the rules.

    Now imagine your corporation is an entire universe...more specifically, a human race with individual thoughts, feelings, and intellectual diversity. You have your own rules by which these people these people should abide. You want them to know the rules so they can stay with your corporation forever, because the absence of your corporation implies death and destruction.

    Question: Would you
    1. Give them a handbook that lays out the rules by which they must behave?
    ...or...
    2. Let them determine their own way, even if it consists of them devising 100's of 1000's of "handbooks" that are eventually used to rules countries and kill those who don't follow the "rules?"

    Fact: There have been over 300,000 polytheistic religions, and over 1000 monotheistic religions.

    Are ANY of them correct?

    I don't think so.

    Discuss...
  • allanon

    Posts: 63

    Dec 21, 2011 12:54 AM GMT
    Out of the hundreds of thousands of religions, only a handful of them gives a "handbook or hell" ultimatum.

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    Dec 21, 2011 1:34 AM GMT
    allanon saidOut of the hundreds of thousands of religions, only a handful of them gives a "handbook or hell" ultimatum.

    Can you list one or more of them that do not contain a "bad place" (aka: Hell, Hades, etc)?
    It's my understanding that ALL religions have a god of ultimatums...peace or destruction.
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    Dec 21, 2011 5:37 AM GMT
    I guess it wasn't God who said "absolute power corrupts absolutely."

    Though, there is a concept (mechanism?) in Buddhism whereby the gods, having become so powerful as to become lazy, de-evolve back to hell. In that sense, there isn't a crossroad with heaven in one direction and hell in the other but a wheel. The idea of Nirvana is to get off the wheel, not as a destination, but as a waypoint so that evolution of consciousness may continue.
  • allanon

    Posts: 63

    Dec 21, 2011 5:20 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    allanon saidOut of the hundreds of thousands of religions, only a handful of them gives a "handbook or hell" ultimatum.

    Can you list one or more of them that do not contain a "bad place" (aka: Hell, Hades, etc)?
    It's my understanding that ALL religions have a god of ultimatums...peace or destruction.


    Buddhism is a big one, Hinduism doesn't really have a "bad" place, there's also shinto, pre-hellenistic Judaism, Taoism, and even some modern Christians are beginning to say that hell does not exist or is empty.
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    Dec 21, 2011 5:37 PM GMT
    It isn't that Buddhism doesn't have a "hell" concept. Haven't studied that aspect in many years but if I remember correctly there are schools of Buddhism which discuss various levels of hell, not unlike Kabbalah & mystic aspects of other religions also do.

    When the main thrust of thinking is not egocentric but rather the evolution of consciousness, and when the "heaven" concept is not a destination or a reward, but a waypoint by which everyone must get off the wheel before anyone, even the Buddha, continues on to evolve further, as evolution is unending, then the hell concept doesn't serve so much as a place of punishment but simply of retraining whereby suffering affords the opportunity to practice the compassion which leads us out of this hell.

    In that regard, humanity is seen as the luckiest of reincarnations for here we have the most tools at our disposal to further evolution, better able to break free from the dog eat dog world of the lower hells. Sadly, not everyone on RJ seems to take advantage of this opportunity.

    Thus, bodhisattva, the Abhisamayalamkara teaches that "because of realization one does not remain in Samsara, because of compassion one does not remain in peace."
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    Dec 22, 2011 1:02 AM GMT
    As a human being, I just want to be happy and I don't want to suffer.
    I have to assume that other human beings want to be happy and don't want to suffer.
    I can be happy despite my suffering.
    I can help others to be happy.
    I can sometimes help alleviate the suffering of others, which makes me happy.
    I can and do devote my time and effort towards leaving the world in a better state for all to be happy and to suffer less.
    That is the purpose of my life.
    My life is not about me.
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    Dec 24, 2011 2:10 PM GMT
    GAMRican saidAs a human being, I just want to be happy and I don't want to suffer.
    I have to assume that other human beings want to be happy and don't want to suffer.
    I can be happy despite my suffering.
    I can help others to be happy.
    I can sometimes help alleviate the suffering of others, which makes me happy.
    I can and do devote my time and effort towards leaving the world in a better state for all to be happy and to suffer less.
    That is the purpose of my life.
    My life is not about me.


    That sounds pretty Buddhist to me. icon_smile.gif
  • DesireIron

    Posts: 426

    Dec 24, 2011 2:54 PM GMT
    A fun read of the Bible....


    goodbook.jpg

    http://www.amazon.com/Good-Book-Hilarious-Disturbing-Marvelous/dp/B005X4BKSO/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1324738151&sr=1-3#_

    Like many Jews and Christians, David Plotz long assumed he knew what was in the Bible. He read parts of it as a child in Hebrew school, then at-tended a Christian high school where he studied the Old and New Testaments. Many of the highlights stuck with him—Adam and Eve, Cain versus Abel, Jacob versus Esau, Jonah versus whale, forty days and nights, ten plagues and commandments, twelve tribes and apostles, Red Sea walked under, Galilee walked on, bush into fire, rock into water, water into wine. And, of course, he absorbed from all around him other bits of the Bible—from stories he heard in churches and synagogues, in movies and on television, from his parents and teachers. But it wasn't until he picked up a Bible at a cousin's bat mitzvah—and became engrossed and horrified by a lesser-known story in Genesis—that he couldn't put it down.

    At a time when wars are fought over scriptural interpretation, when the influence of religion on American politics has never been greater, when many Americans still believe in the Bible's literal truth, it has never been more important to get to know the Bible. Good Book is what happens when a regular guy—an average Job—actually reads the book on which his religion, his culture, and his world are based. Along the way, he grapples with the most profound theological questions: How many commandments do we actually need? Does God prefer obedience or good deeds? And the most unexpected ones: Why are so many women in the Bible prostitutes? Why does God love bald men so much? Is Samson really that stupid?
  • DesireIron

    Posts: 426

    Dec 24, 2011 3:05 PM GMT
    GAMRican saidAs a human being, I just want to be happy and I don't want to suffer.
    I have to assume that other human beings want to be happy and don't want to suffer.
    I can be happy despite my suffering.


    Ha ha ha....you know that funny "Latin" text you sometimes see when they just want to hold the space on a page, that's what that text is talking about....

    Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem, quia voluptas sit, aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos, qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt, neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum, quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci[ng] velit, sed quia non numquam [do] eius modi tempora inci[di]dunt, ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit, qui in ea voluptate velit esse, quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum, qui dolorem eum fugiat, quo voluptas nulla pariatur?

    No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally encounter consequences that are extremely painful. Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself, because it is pain, but occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 26, 2011 9:38 AM GMT
    taoists talk of heaven and earth, not heaven and hell. Though taoism is only semi a "religion" - it´s just as much a philosophy
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    Jan 05, 2012 9:27 PM GMT
    icon_neutral.gif

    I worked for a large corporation that had an eleven-volume employee handbook. However, it was a "controlled document." Copies were kept in "secure reading rooms" and only level-III managers or above could read it. I'm not kidding.

    I didn't realize at the time how spiritual that place was.