Full Sized American pick up trucks: do they HAVE to be that H U G E?

  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Dec 21, 2011 11:30 AM GMT
    that tall?

    that long?

    that wide?



    SERIOUSLY icon_question.gificon_question.gificon_question.gif




    icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 21, 2011 12:27 PM GMT
    Yes, they do. Anything less would be unmanly and gay.
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    Dec 21, 2011 12:32 PM GMT
    Trollileo said
    paulflexes saidYes, they do. Anything less would be unmanly and gay.
    Like you'd know what's manly. You fly a plane you fairy.
    I also play piano and fuck unicorns with rainbow colored condoms, but that doesn't make me gay.
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    Dec 21, 2011 12:33 PM GMT
    Trollileo said
    paulflexes said
    Trollileo said
    paulflexes saidYes, they do. Anything less would be unmanly and gay.
    Like you'd know what's manly. You fly a plane you fairy.
    I also play piano and fuck unicorns with rainbow colored condoms, but that doesn't make me gay.
    Let's get one thing straight. We're not gay. We just have a lust for penis.
    I have a lust for biceps.
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    Dec 21, 2011 12:34 PM GMT
    They have to get as much shit as possible in them for us to buy.
    What's really scary are the double ones, like two 24 footers linked together. Dunno if they have them in the states but those are scary.
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    Dec 21, 2011 12:38 PM GMT
    Trollileo said
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidIt's all about size.
    Don't be such a size queen.


    1009534542_truck%20nuts.jpg
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Dec 21, 2011 12:46 PM GMT
    What do you mean? They aren't that big until you can walk underneath em!

    LOL.... jk

    I know what you mean, honestly, the large wheels don't do much for me either.
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    Dec 21, 2011 12:53 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidYes, they do. Anything less would be unmanly and gay.


    So true !!!!
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    Dec 21, 2011 12:54 PM GMT
    Well... Since I drive one everyday...

    height: ground clearance is required for going off-road, say to the dump, or to the lumber yard, where "roads" can resemble moon-like surfaces with lots of mud...

    Tallness (different from height above ground): Due to the engineering, and folks, for some reason, wanting a flat bed, this requires that the bed of the truck sit almost completely above all the the mechanicals beneath it, and you must allow room as well, for when the truck's suspension is completely extended or compresses. This takes up a lot of room under a bed.

    As we do care about aesthetics, folks require the bed and cab to carry the same body lines, so although the front isn't required to be quite as high from an engineering perspective, aesthetics require it. There is still a lot of mechanical stuff to clear up front, as well.... getting a truck really low is not possible, and retain the functionality of the truck.

    Width. Our roads are wide. Trucks need, at the bare minimum, to be able to carry a 4' sheet of plywood flat in the bed (or sheetrock, concrete board, etc, etc). That means the bare interior dimension of the bed of the truck must be 50" between the wheel wells, and the wheels to intrude into the bed, in order to keep width down to an extent. Being able to haul as much stuff as possible is nice. Then...the rest of the truck must match the width of the bed, and you must recall we have to have enough steel and crumple zones to keep you save in the event someone t-bones the bed of the truck.

    length: 6' bed is the bare minimum if you want to do something useful. That will enable you to carry an 8' piece of lumber without it hanging over the tailgate. That's really not enough that, it's nice to have an 8' bed, where you can drop the 8' lumber in, and shut the tailgate.

    Then its' really nice, if you have a truck, and are really using it... to be able to have storage behind the seat - hence the extended cab or 4 door cabs, and trust me, we can fill that up quickly with tools, people plans, parts, drawings, lunch, extra clothes, etc, etc, etc.

    So length is dictated by the size of lumber, and consumer demand. Keep in mind, most of the pickups bought nowadays are going to be worked.

    I use mine every day of the week. Last week it hauled 4000# of sand, countless amounts of trash to the dump, had several 6000# trailers behind it. 4x4 was required in a couple places... it was used as a mini grader (don't ask)...

    Then I routinely put my 18' car hauling trailer behind it, chain the Jeep down, and take off for the woods for a few days...the bed and cab being full of camping gear, spare parts, tools, etc.

    So yeah. I love my truck. It's big. It weighs a lot (7500# empty), it's capable of towing 13,000 # (and I've towed very close to that limit), it's comfortable. The big cab is nice on trips - room to sprawl. And trust me, when you spend the bulk of your day, and it becomes your mobile office... space is nice.

    The truck makers very much listen to the heavy duty truck market (that would be F250+, 2500+ for Chevy and Ram - and they give this market what they want. It's a huge money-maker for them, and they depend on us going through trucks. It's not unusual for a company to put 50-70k miles on a worktruck in a year, being used hard, every day...

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    Dec 21, 2011 12:55 PM GMT
    Trollileo said
    paulflexes said
    Trollileo said
    paulflexes said
    Trollileo said
    paulflexes saidYes, they do. Anything less would be unmanly and gay.
    Like you'd know what's manly. You fly a plane you fairy.
    I also play piano and fuck unicorns with rainbow colored condoms, but that doesn't make me gay.
    Let's get one thing straight. We're not gay. We just have a lust for penis.
    I have a lust for biceps.
    Some women have biceps.
    I've actually lusted after a few women's biceps. icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 21, 2011 12:57 PM GMT
    tumblr_lwk0ptf8sS1r8wcmfo1_500.jpg
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    Dec 21, 2011 12:58 PM GMT
    Trollileo said
    paulflexes said
    Trollileo said
    paulflexes said
    Trollileo said
    paulflexes said
    Trollileo said
    paulflexes saidYes, they do. Anything less would be unmanly and gay.
    Like you'd know what's manly. You fly a plane you fairy.
    I also play piano and fuck unicorns with rainbow colored condoms, but that doesn't make me gay.
    Let's get one thing straight. We're not gay. We just have a lust for penis.
    I have a lust for biceps.
    Some women have biceps.
    I've actually lusted after a few women's biceps. icon_lol.gif
    See. You're clearly... Biceptual.
    Does this my gold card has officially been revoked? icon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 21, 2011 1:24 PM GMT
    guyjeep8 saidSo length is dictated by the size of lumber, and consumer demand. Keep in mind, most of the pickups bought nowadays are going to be worked.

    Yeah, and pickups are the basic building block for a thousand different variants and applications. They're designed to accept a snow plow on the front, towing beams out back, light dump boxes, goose necks for horse trailers, stake beds for bulky hauling, accommodating slide-in campers, the list is endless. Entire industries depend on standard pickup sizing for their products and modifications. And as you note, the factory pickup box must accept standard US lumber sizes, especially the ubiquitous 4 x 8-foot plywood sheet.

    What may be annoying to mch is the use of pickups to satisfy the driver's image, in fancy tricked-out vehicles that may never carry anything more than a Honda Accord would. When I was first licensed you couldn't park a pickup or other commercial vehicle in your driveway in many communities, same as some ban the parking of RVs and trailers even today. And the roads were mainly filled with standard-sized passenger cars, very few trucks, panel vans just becoming popular, and no tall SUVs at all. Your view of the road ahead was much more open than you have today, no huge walls blocking your vision to the front. And backing out of parking lot spaces was very easy, you weren't blinded by towering canyons of steel and tinted glass to either side of you.
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    Dec 21, 2011 1:39 PM GMT
    guyjeep8 saidWell... Since I drive one everyday...

    height: ground clearance is required for going off-road, say to the dump, or to the lumber yard, where "roads" can resemble moon-like surfaces with lots of mud...

    Tallness (different from height above ground): Due to the engineering, and folks, for some reason, wanting a flat bed, this requires that the bed of the truck sit almost completely above all the the mechanicals beneath it, and you must allow room as well, for when the truck's suspension is completely extended or compresses. This takes up a lot of room under a bed.

    As we do care about aesthetics, folks require the bed and cab to carry the same body lines, so although the front isn't required to be quite as high from an engineering perspective, aesthetics require it. There is still a lot of mechanical stuff to clear up front, as well.... getting a truck really low is not possible, and retain the functionality of the truck.

    Width. Our roads are wide. Trucks need, at the bare minimum, to be able to carry a 4' sheet of plywood flat in the bed (or sheetrock, concrete board, etc, etc). That means the bare interior dimension of the bed of the truck must be 50" between the wheel wells, and the wheels to intrude into the bed, in order to keep width down to an extent. Being able to haul as much stuff as possible is nice. Then...the rest of the truck must match the width of the bed, and you must recall we have to have enough steel and crumple zones to keep you save in the event someone t-bones the bed of the truck.

    length: 6' bed is the bare minimum if you want to do something useful. That will enable you to carry an 8' piece of lumber without it hanging over the tailgate. That's really not enough that, it's nice to have an 8' bed, where you can drop the 8' lumber in, and shut the tailgate.

    Then its' really nice, if you have a truck, and are really using it... to be able to have storage behind the seat - hence the extended cab or 4 door cabs, and trust me, we can fill that up quickly with tools, people plans, parts, drawings, lunch, extra clothes, etc, etc, etc.

    So length is dictated by the size of lumber, and consumer demand. Keep in mind, most of the pickups bought nowadays are going to be worked.

    I use mine every day of the week. Last week it hauled 4000# of sand, countless amounts of trash to the dump, had several 6000# trailers behind it. 4x4 was required in a couple places... it was used as a mini grader (don't ask)...

    Then I routinely put my 18' car hauling trailer behind it, chain the Jeep down, and take off for the woods for a few days...the bed and cab being full of camping gear, spare parts, tools, etc.

    So yeah. I love my truck. It's big. It weighs a lot (7500# empty), it's capable of towing 13,000 # (and I've towed very close to that limit), it's comfortable. The big cab is nice on trips - room to sprawl. And trust me, when you spend the bulk of your day, and it becomes your mobile office... space is nice.

    The truck makers very much listen to the heavy duty truck market (that would be F250+, 2500+ for Chevy and Ram - and they give this market what they want. It's a huge money-maker for them, and they depend on us going through trucks. It's not unusual for a company to put 50-70k miles on a worktruck in a year, being used hard, every day...



    Yea but you actually use yours as a truck. As Art_Deco said a lot of people seem to buy these things to convey something about themselves and their lifestyle without actually engaging in any of the activities you're talking about. Case in point (similar, but related) the Hummer H1 is ridiculously big, not practical for carrying anything, and yet was popular here in Northern NJ (where offroading possibilities are pretty limited) simply for image. The type of people who I saw driving them were not going to risk getting it dirty, either.

    That said, I really want a Wrangler JK, and -- if I get one -- I plan to get a trailer for it. I don't need it for my job but it would be handy for home projects, yard work and some of my volunteer stuff.
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    Dec 21, 2011 1:58 PM GMT
    My partner and I.... in addition to each of us having a car, we also have 2 half ton pickups for general driving when weather conditions warrant 4 wheel drive. (We live in a very rural area and need 4 wheel in winter.) We also have a 3/4 ton for pulling our livestock (cattle) trailers, and 24' flatbed gooseneck trailer. We also have a 2 ton truck for hauling some hay, gravel, etc. None of our pickups have extended cabs or 4 doors.

    We are also looking for a 1 ton pickup to replace the 3/4 ton.

    The thing I don't understand is when I see someone in the city, in a 4 door monster pickup, that I doubt has ever even spent a day in the country. What could he possibly need with it? It's enough to make me laugh.

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    Dec 21, 2011 2:22 PM GMT
    The bigger the truck, the smaller the dick.

    ( thats a straight womens quote)
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    Dec 21, 2011 2:23 PM GMT
    As long as one company is building huge full size pickups the rest will follow suit.
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    Dec 21, 2011 2:27 PM GMT
    PaulNKS saidMy partner and I.... in addition to each of us having a car, we also have 2 half ton pickups for general driving when weather conditions warrant 4 wheel drive. (We live in a very rural area and need 4 wheel in winter.) We also have a 3/4 ton for pulling our livestock (cattle) trailers, and 24' flatbed gooseneck trailer. We also have a 2 ton truck for hauling some hay, gravel, etc. None of our pickups have extended cabs or 4 doors.

    We are also looking for a 1 ton pickup to replace the 3/4 ton.

    The thing I don't understand is when I see someone in the city, in a 4 door monster pickup, that I doubt has ever even spent a day in the country. What could he possibly need with it? It's enough to make me laugh.



    Other than people in construction trades, strictly for image. Not sure what they're trying to say about themselves.
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    Dec 21, 2011 2:32 PM GMT
    The only reason guys buy trucks that big is if they have a small Dick and are compensating or they're 7ft tall like my uncle who has issues comfortably fitting in anything smaller. Haha
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    Dec 21, 2011 2:35 PM GMT
    stryker326 saidThe only reason guys buy trucks that big is if they have a small Dick and are compensating or they're 7ft tall like my uncle who has issues comfortably fitting in anything smaller. Haha


    Yes because guys don't do things like hunt and tow stuff. I see no correlation between dick size and car, and I drive a Honda civic. Nothing wrong with a big truck, just be prepared for a big gas bill.
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    Dec 21, 2011 2:36 PM GMT
    Pick up truck is a work truck. Very necessary in certain lines of employment and rural areas. Only a douche bag would drive one for looks. Lmao
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    Dec 21, 2011 2:56 PM GMT
    I don't care. Whether you "need" or "want" a big ass truck, doesn't matter to me. Just stay the fuck out of the left lane.
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    Dec 21, 2011 3:01 PM GMT
    guyjeep8 saidWell... Since I drive one everyday...

    height: ground clearance is required for going off-road, say to the dump, or to the lumber yard, where "roads" can resemble moon-like surfaces with lots of mud...

    Tallness (different from height above ground): Due to the engineering, and folks, for some reason, wanting a flat bed, this requires that the bed of the truck sit almost completely above all the the mechanicals beneath it, and you must allow room as well, for when the truck's suspension is completely extended or compresses. This takes up a lot of room under a bed.

    As we do care about aesthetics, folks require the bed and cab to carry the same body lines, so although the front isn't required to be quite as high from an engineering perspective, aesthetics require it. There is still a lot of mechanical stuff to clear up front, as well.... getting a truck really low is not possible, and retain the functionality of the truck.

    Width. Our roads are wide. Trucks need, at the bare minimum, to be able to carry a 4' sheet of plywood flat in the bed (or sheetrock, concrete board, etc, etc). That means the bare interior dimension of the bed of the truck must be 50" between the wheel wells, and the wheels to intrude into the bed, in order to keep width down to an extent. Being able to haul as much stuff as possible is nice. Then...the rest of the truck must match the width of the bed, and you must recall we have to have enough steel and crumple zones to keep you save in the event someone t-bones the bed of the truck.

    length: 6' bed is the bare minimum if you want to do something useful. That will enable you to carry an 8' piece of lumber without it hanging over the tailgate. That's really not enough that, it's nice to have an 8' bed, where you can drop the 8' lumber in, and shut the tailgate.

    Then its' really nice, if you have a truck, and are really using it... to be able to have storage behind the seat - hence the extended cab or 4 door cabs, and trust me, we can fill that up quickly with tools, people plans, parts, drawings, lunch, extra clothes, etc, etc, etc.

    So length is dictated by the size of lumber, and consumer demand. Keep in mind, most of the pickups bought nowadays are going to be worked.

    I use mine every day of the week. Last week it hauled 4000# of sand, countless amounts of trash to the dump, had several 6000# trailers behind it. 4x4 was required in a couple places... it was used as a mini grader (don't ask)...

    Then I routinely put my 18' car hauling trailer behind it, chain the Jeep down, and take off for the woods for a few days...the bed and cab being full of camping gear, spare parts, tools, etc.

    So yeah. I love my truck. It's big. It weighs a lot (7500# empty), it's capable of towing 13,000 # (and I've towed very close to that limit), it's comfortable. The big cab is nice on trips - room to sprawl. And trust me, when you spend the bulk of your day, and it becomes your mobile office... space is nice.

    The truck makers very much listen to the heavy duty truck market (that would be F250+, 2500+ for Chevy and Ram - and they give this market what they want. It's a huge money-maker for them, and they depend on us going through trucks. It's not unusual for a company to put 50-70k miles on a worktruck in a year, being used hard, every day...



    A picture and verification is required for me to give a shit.

    Also: how does anybody get any work done if they're driving 200 miles a day. That's like 4 to 5 hours of driving a day...

    Also, why are we NOT supposed to ask about a "mini Grader?" Are we too gay to know what that is? I'm pretty sure google has no sexual-orientation search restrictions.

    You make some valid points about WHY the size is neccessary, and I'd have no problem with it, you just sound like a 50"x8' truckload of douche.
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    Dec 21, 2011 3:19 PM GMT
    I owned a Ford F-150 standard cab, with a straight-6 and 5-speed manual, totally basic with a vinyl bench seat and a rubber floor, no carpeting, hand-crank windows, but it did have A/C. I used it to tow a small Wells Cargo enclosed trailer, rigged to carry my motorcycle as well as do general hauling. The Ford also towed my pop-up camper, both trailers within the F-150s capacity, using an electric brake controller.

    I like pickup trucks, a specialized tool for specific jobs. But as a city runabout its heavy weight and poor mileage makes it a wasteful extravagance. I lived in a State where half the roads are unpaved, winter storms fierce, where 4-wheel drive, a rugged suspension and high clearance are practical things to have. Tell me why you need that on urban streets, especially in the nearly snowless South?
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    Dec 21, 2011 3:21 PM GMT
    I don't NEEEED a Wrangler either, but I REAALLLLY want one and it fits in with longer range plans, which include a utility trailer and a vintage Airstream.