Cdn NDP leadership race

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 2:59 AM GMT
    Is anyone following it?

    Thomas Mulcair was in my town today.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 3:00 AM GMT
    http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/News/Local/2011-12-21/article-2844408/Mulcair-gains-support-of-two-high-profile-P.E.I.-New-Democrats/1


    photo_1955086_resize.jpg


    Two high profile P.E.I. New Democrats threw their support behind federal NDP leadership candidate Thomas Mulcair during his visit to the province Wednesday.

    Herb Dickieson, the only New Democrat ever elected to the P.E.I. legislature, officially announced his support Wednesday of Mulcair's bid to replace the late Jack Layton.

    It was, in fact, Dickieson who first encouraged the Quebec MP to join the race after Layton's death left the party without a permanent leader last August, Mulcair told a group of supporters at a coffee shop in Charlottetown Wednesday.

    Dickieson said he has long believed Mulcair has the qualities of a good party leader.

    "It's clearly a very important position to be the leader of the official Opposition and the prime minister in waiting, and I believe Thomas Mulcair has the skill set to fit that role and to gain the trust of Canadians to be the next prime minister," Dickieson said.

    He referenced Mulcair's efforts to save a provincial park in Quebec from being developed into condominiums and his subsequent demotion and resignation from provincial cabinet in 2006 as a major reason for supporting Mulcair's federal leadership bid.

    "He took a principled stand for the environment and it was costly to his own personal career, but one that he felt was very important, and to me, it's the kind of action that one would have seen from Tommy Douglas," Dickieson said.

    Mulcair was in Charlottetown Wednesday to meet with local NDP members and try to drum up support for his candidacy.

    Results from a recent survey published in the Huffington Post show Mulcair edging out as the frontrunner in the multi-candidate race for leadership of the Opposition NDP.

    On Wednesday, the number of candidates dropped when Robert Chisholm announced he was pulling out of the race due to his inability to become bilingual in time for the convention in March.

    Joe Byrne, the popular NDP candidate who ran in Charlottetown in the last federal election, told The Guardian Wednesday he had not yet decided who he would support for the leadership.

    But after news of Chisholm's resignation from the race broke Wednesday afternoon, Byrne threw his support behind Mulcair.

    He said Mulcair's positions on issues important to P.E.I. helped to win him over.

    "I am endorsing him because he is committed to some of the core principles that are key for the NDP to form the government of the country," Byrne said.

    "Tom supports policies which are good for P.E.I. including federal support for the Lower Churchill development which will give us a third electric cable and support for a moratorium on hydraulic fracking."

    Mulcair said he believes the NDP can become the party of choice for Islanders and is not daunted by the fact third parties have not traditionally been frontrunners in P.E.I. elections.

    "In 2008 I became the first person ever elected for the NDP federally in Quebec in a general election and now I've been elected three times for the NDP," he said.

    He pledged to invest resources and dollars into P.E.I. NDP campaigns if his leadership bid is successful.

    "If we don't invest here in the province and we don't realize there are four seats that are within reach by connecting with people and the money and the people necessary, then it will be a self-fulfilling prophecy that it will continue to be an alternating system between Liberals and Conservatives."

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 3:03 AM GMT
    Music to my ears.
    (mine is one of those four ridings.)
    icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 3:38 AM GMT
    The funny thing is that you actually think anyone really cares - is it any wonder with their disproven and reckless economic ideas?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 2:31 PM GMT
    lol, riddler thinks in polarities.

    We're following it. The guy appears to be just the ticket.

    We'd also really like to see the Liberals clean their house and get back in the saddle.

    Love the multi-party (instead of two party) system.
  • TrentGrad

    Posts: 1541

    Dec 22, 2011 2:35 PM GMT
    meninlove said lol, riddler thinks in polarities.

    We're following it. The guy appears to be just the ticket.

    We'd also really like to see the Liberals clean their house and get back in the saddle.

    Love the multi-party (instead of two party) system.


    The multi-party system always ensures that conservative voters get more representation than their numbers warrant!

    The NDP is sagging in Quebec...the BQ is rising again, and in a few years time, we could well see another Harper majority if the political centre-left remains splintered between THREE political parties!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 2:39 PM GMT
    Trent, look back in history and you'll see it isn't so.

    icon_wink.gif


    Say, Merry Christmas!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 2:45 PM GMT
    I miss having News World International on my cable tv line up! It was a station that was fed by CBC. I learned so much about Canadian politics watching that during the whole scandal when the conservatives began their take over.I think it was when Martin had to make a minority governmet or soemthing like that... I'd wiki it but its just not that crucial.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 2:58 PM GMT
    It goes in cycles, Ryan, with Liberals forming gov't or Conservatives, with the NDP, Bloc and Green party as combined opposition at times.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 3:01 PM GMT
    As if Canada matters.

    :-p
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 3:05 PM GMT
    cthulu saidAs if Canada matters.

    :-p



    Well, we are, apparently, wanted by the US for our oil, electricity, and water. Minor stuff. icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 7:16 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    cthulu saidAs if Canada matters.

    :-p



    Well, we are, apparently, wanted by the US for our oil, electricity, and water. Minor stuff. icon_wink.gif


    And some of your men.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 7:41 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    cthulu saidAs if Canada matters.

    :-p



    Well, we are, apparently, wanted by the US for our oil, electricity, and water. Minor stuff. icon_wink.gif


    China would be just as happy to buy our oil. ;)
    w e really ought tosell it to them and have the US lose its number one oil supply. They can rely on Mexico and their good friends in the middle east to keep them supplied for a while, then hike our prices.

    Hell the US pays for our socialist system by buying our oil. Their economy is owned by China - why not just deal with the puppetmaster and let the puppet freeze n the dark?

    icon_lol.gif


    Canada doesn't matter - much.
    icon_wink.gif



    It's just business. icon_twisted.gif

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 7:44 PM GMT
    1) the myth of NDP economic recklessness -- look back in history to successive majority NDP govs in Manitoba, BC, Sask, and the Yukon to correct that fallacy.

    that said --


    2) the myth of the NDP as an alternative to Liberals -- again, just look at the policies of sitting NDP governments: salmon farming in BC, right-of-centre-Romanow in SK, Flip-flop Rae in Ontario -- they're just small 'L' Liberals when they get to power.

    3) the myth of the working class base -- when given the chance the 'so-called' working class (other than in Windsor) votes Conservative, Reform, or whatever small-minded thugs yank on their leash. The progressives in the union movement cut off their own balls when they looked after the unions and saw no need to voice for the working poor outside their door. As did the tenured-intellectuals of the NDP.

    The NDP is a lost cause today, filled with timid and self-absorbed antiquarians -- not the visionaries of Tommy Douglas and Stephen Lewis or the stalwarts of Ed Broadbent and Audrey McLaughlin. When or if they wake-up they should throw their support behind the Greens or at least rip-off some of their policies if they want to be relevant next election.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 7:54 PM GMT
    iracetris said1) the myth of NDP economic recklessness -- look back in history to successive majority NDP govs in Manitoba, BC, Sask, and the Yukon to correct that fallacy.

    that said --


    2) the myth of the NDP as an alternative to Liberals -- again, just look at the policies of sitting NDP governments: salmon farming in BC, right-of-centre-Romanow in SK, Flip-flop Rae in Ontario -- they're just small 'L' Liberals when they get to power.

    3) the myth of the working class base -- when given the chance the 'so-called' working class (other than in Windsor) votes Conservative, Reform, or whatever small-minded thugs yank on their leash. The progressives in the union movement cut off their own balls when they looked after the unions and saw no need to voice for the working poor outside their door. As did the tenured-intellectuals of the NDP.

    The NDP is a lost cause today, filled with timid and self-absorbed antiquarians -- not the visionaries of Tommy Douglas and Stephen Lewis or the stalwarts of Ed Broadbent and Audrey McLaughlin. When or if they wake-up they should throw their support behind the Greens or at least rip-off some of their policies if they want to be relevant next election.


    you speak a lot of truth there - and we are saying the same thing within Party ranks. We are particularly concerned that people do not realise the Greens are Conservatives who have embraced the undoing if the environmental damage of commercial exploitation as a new unexploited commercial opportunity. Notice the only people benefitting from the green party are Green politicians who have leveraged comfortable salaries?

    The leader of the PEI Green Party is salaried by the Greens nationally to just create photo ops for herself. Great job if you can get it.
    But they work the hell out of their volunteers. ;)

    (coincidentally , we went to the same school at different times).




  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 8:00 PM GMT
    I particularly like that you mention a return to the democratic socialism of Tommy Douglas and the principled determination of Ed Broadbent.

    Paul Dewar has that kind of charisma and principle. I wish his French wre better though (it is only as good as mine - which is fine outside of Québec.
    He could even pass muster in most of New Brunswick (which is the only officially bilingual province (meaing all provincial services as well as federal must be provided in both official languages.)
  • hyperionx

    Posts: 232

    Dec 22, 2011 8:10 PM GMT
    Definitely following it, hoping for Mulcair. The by-election to fill our seat in Toronto–Danforth hasn't been called, yet, but should be soon. You can find me canvassing when it happens!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Dec 22, 2011 8:26 PM GMT
    Upper_Cdn said
    iracetris said... We are particularly concerned that people do not realise the Greens are Conservatives who have embraced the undoing if the environmental damage of commercial exploitation as a new unexploited commercial opportunity. Notice the only people benefitting from the green party are Green politicians who have leveraged comfortable salaries?


    I'm not convinced that your take on the Greens is accurate, but I'm glad to hear the party ranks of the NDP are restless for internal change.

    I'm not sure what you mean by "Greens are Conservatives who have embraced the undoing of the environmental damage of commercial exploitation ..." Are you saying the Greens support things like the Alberta Tar Sands and the Northern Gateway project? I think NOT! Rather, they want to see sustainable/re-newable energy as an economic engine because, and this is the whole message of the Greens, it can create a sustainable economy.

    Now with that said, I personally don't believe that any party espousing an economic solution can actually pony up with one once elected. Just look back on every government in Western history which claimed prior to election that they would 'fix' the economy. The closest success was just a wholesale auction of resources (the post-war industrial period) or fire-sale of public capital and utilities (the 80s through today). Consumer capitalism won't allow it to happen because it's a progressive theory reliant upon unlimited resources (which don't exist). Until the West gets a new take on economic theory; one based on a circular rather than linear model of exchange, the flavour of the gov't either speeds-up the disaster (Harper et al) or slows it down (NDP et al), but neither can stop it coming.

    Not sure about your comment re PEI Greens leader. Aren't all political party leaders paid a salary from their party's coffers? And don't all parties work their volunteers to the bone?