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Chewing On Cinnamon Sticks

  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 23, 2011 1:52 PM GMT
    Try it! I just dicovered this by accident.... if you chew a bit on a piece of stick (not a whole rolled up one, but just a piece from it) and keep the inside of the stick on your tongue its like chewing natural cinnamon gum... and it last much longer.. all the oils come out of the wood and taste delicious and freshens your breath... fantastic.... im never throwing out my used cinnamon anymore icon_smile.gif

    atla121707-cinammon.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 23, 2011 2:10 PM GMT
    I found a list of other things its purported to do...

    - Cinnamon soothes stomach and digestive complaints such as flatulence, indigestion, heartburn and stomach cramps.
    - It is an excellent medicine for colds, congestion, temperature and flu.
    - Research has shown that cinnamon is effective against fungus and yeast infections.
    - Cinnamon can be used to lower fever by promoting seating.
    - Cinnamon oil can be used to treat chest infections and catarrh.
    - It can help improve blood circulation around the body especially to the hands and feet.
    - Cinnamon is an aid for weak digestion.
    - It can help reduce pain caused by arthritis, rheumatism and muscle pain.
    - Cinnamon is a calming herb and can reduce anxiety, depression and stress.
    - It can help with sickness, nausea and vomiting.
    - Cinnamon can stimulate menstrual bleeding and help regulate periods.
    - It has been proved to lower high blood pressure.
    - Chewing cinnamon sticks can relieve toothache and freshen the breath.
    - Cinnamon is effective in the prevention of blood clots.
    - Cinnamon has been proven to regulate blood sugar levels in people with type-2 diabetes and also to improve their response to insulin.
    - Cinnamon is a good source of manganese, iron and calcium, which are all vital minerals required for a healthy body.


    http://www.helpwithcooking.com/spice-guide/cinnamon.html

    So get yourself a piece of stick and chew haha....
  • calibro Posts: 8888
    QUOTE Dec 23, 2011 4:31 PM GMT
    that's not cinnamon... it's cassia. whenever you see a "cinnamon stick" it's probably cassia. real cinnamon looks like this...

    Real_Cinnamon_Sticks.jpg

  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 24, 2011 12:40 AM GMT
    Cassia = a type of cinnamon
  • DesireIron Posts: 426
    QUOTE Dec 24, 2011 12:50 AM GMT
    Cinnamon's Scent Boosts Brain Function

    Not only does consuming cinnamon improve the body's ability to utilize blood sugar, but just smelling the wonderful odor of this sweet spice boosts brain activity!

    Research led by Dr. P. Zoladz and presented April 24, 2004, at the annual meeting of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences, in Sarasota, FL, found that chewing cinnamon flavored gum or just smelling cinnamon enhanced study participants' cognitive processing. Specifically, cinnamon improved participants' scores on tasks related to attentional processes, virtual recognition memory, working memory, and visual-motor speed while working on a computer-based program. Participants were exposed to four odorant conditions: no odor, peppermint odor, jasmine, and cinnamon, with cinnamon emerging the clear winner in producing positive effects on brain function. Encouraged by the results of these studies, researchers will be evaluating cinnamon''s potential for enhancing cognition in the elderly, individuals with test-anxiety, and possibly even patients with diseases that lead to cognitive decline.

  • calibro Posts: 8888
    QUOTE Dec 26, 2011 5:26 AM GMT
    GreenHopper saidSidenote: in the past they used to call Chinese cinnamon "serichata" whereas "cassia" was reserved for C. iners... if you believe Wiki that is... could be wrong lol... nontheless, the inner bark of several species is used to make the spice cinnamon.... cassia being one


    cassia is not cinnamon. it's a plant related to the cinnamon plant. they have similar tastes, but it's far inferior in taste to actual cinnamon. this is like saying a mandarin and a clementine are the same fruit.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 26, 2011 4:25 PM GMT
    Reads kinky!
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 27, 2011 12:19 AM GMT
    calibro said
    GreenHopper saidSidenote: in the past they used to call Chinese cinnamon "serichata" whereas "cassia" was reserved for C. iners... if you believe Wiki that is... could be wrong lol... nontheless, the inner bark of several species is used to make the spice cinnamon.... cassia being one


    cassia is not cinnamon. it's a plant related to the cinnamon plant. they have similar tastes, but it's far inferior in taste to actual cinnamon. this is like saying a mandarin and a clementine are the same fruit.


    They are citrus...
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 27, 2011 1:32 AM GMT
    GreenHopper saidThey are citrus...
    so is a lemon but you aren't going to be using lemons in orange cake.

    Although lemon cake tastes delicious after it's been glazed

    But on a technical basis Calibro is correct, I have a few different types of cinnamon in the cupboard, the type you posted Greenhopper doesn't taste nearly as good as what is considered to be a real cinnamon stick, however it is used rather well in foods that are highly complex in flavor where normal cinnamon flavors are lost in the mix.

    But if you were to make say, cinnamon ice cream you use real cinnamon where all the subtle flavors come through brilliantly and where other types just taste more flat.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 27, 2011 1:47 AM GMT
    The discussin Calibro started was not about which cinnamon tastes better.. its about whether cassia is a cinnamon or not... this is a specialist discussion that Im not about to have because thats not what this thread is about. have it your way outside of this thread guys... this is about the health benefits of chewing cinnamon as it is known in LAYMAN's terms... if you want a specialist cooking thread.. do it there... Im not interested in discussing cinnamon cooking on here.. the health benefits of layman's fake cinnamon are listed and Im not about to waste my time with this guys.. note that the title is CHEWING cinnamon sticks and what people buy as cinnamon sticks is cassia.. therefore the purpose is served by calling it what they call it.... I know full well about the differences between the different kinds of cinnamon.. it is of no consequence to begin talking about specialist terms and cooking stuff on a layman's thread that doesnt cover the cooking topic and is not a debate about the different forms of cinnamon.. chewing the stick is what this thread is clearly about.. I'll stick to the topic and worry about the specialist stuff in the appropriate setting people
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 27, 2011 1:50 AM GMT
    You're very knowledgeable on cinnamon sticks... O.O
    I remember this guy I once talked to said his exgirlfriend called his d**k that he's gay now. I wonder if there's a link there... icon_razz.gif
    Sorry for trolling this O.O
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 27, 2011 2:42 AM GMT
    What about cinnamon powder that you sprinkle on things like pudding, or into eggnog? Does it provide similar health benefits?
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 27, 2011 3:39 AM GMT
    ^ yes it does... and to satisfy the purists... if you have cinnamon powder that you buy, it is possible that it has been produced with several varieties of cinnamon.. including other varieties than true cinnamon... these other varieties should not be over-used because some, in addition to the health benefits, can have a side effect of thinning the blood... true cinnamon is the safest variety and does not carry that risk, but it may not be available in powdered form... nonetheless.. if you dont overuse the powdered cinnamon, you will have no problem...
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 27, 2011 3:50 AM GMT
    GreenHopper said^ yes it does... and to satisfy the purists... if you have cinnamon powder that you buy, it is possible that it has been produced with several varieties of cinnamon.. including other varieties than true cinnamon... these other varieties should not be over-used because some, in addition to the health benefits, can have a side effect of thinning the blood... true cinnamon is the safest variety and does not carry that risk, but it may not be available in powdered form... nonetheless.. if you dont overuse the powdered cinnamon, you will have no problem...

    OK, I've got a fresh eggnog in front of me, sprinkled with powered cinnamon (also spiked with a bit of rum). I raise my glass to you. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 27, 2011 3:59 PM GMT
    GreenHopper saidThe discussin Calibro started was not about which cinnamon tastes better.. its about whether cassia is a cinnamon or not... this is a specialist discussion that Im not about to have because thats not what this thread is about. have it your way outside of this thread guys... this is about the health benefits of chewing cinnamon as it is known in LAYMAN's terms... if you want a specialist cooking thread.. do it there... Im not interested in discussing cinnamon cooking on here.. the health benefits of layman's fake cinnamon are listed and Im not about to waste my time with this guys.. note that the title is CHEWING cinnamon sticks and what people buy as cinnamon sticks is cassia.. therefore the purpose is served by calling it what they call it.... I know full well about the differences between the different kinds of cinnamon.. it is of no consequence to begin talking about specialist terms and cooking stuff on a layman's thread that doesnt cover the cooking topic and is not a debate about the different forms of cinnamon.. chewing the stick is what this thread is clearly about.. I'll stick to the topic and worry about the specialist stuff in the appropriate setting people


    he just has this need to be right and achieves it by pedantry

    Ep9+Bored+Puppy.jpg
  • rankoutsider Posts: 179
    QUOTE Dec 27, 2011 4:13 PM GMT
    GreenHopper said^ yes it does... and to satisfy the purists... if you have cinnamon powder that you buy, it is possible that it has been produced with several varieties of cinnamon.. including other varieties than true cinnamon... these other varieties should not be over-used because some, in addition to the health benefits, can have a side effect of thinning the blood... true cinnamon is the safest variety and does not carry that risk, but it may not be available in powdered form... nonetheless.. if you dont overuse the powdered cinnamon, you will have no problem...




    All varieties of cinnamon have basically the same chemical components that provide claimed health benefits. Just as most varieties of oranges provide vitamin C.
    Although, for nausea and vomiting, it is best to chew on a piece of ginger(not a big piece). I prefer to sip on ginger beer over chipped ice.
    Many spices have pharmacological effects. And just like common drugs, too much can be a bad thing(Just eat a bunch of whole nutmegs if you doubt it!).
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 27, 2011 6:53 PM GMT
    rankoutsider said
    GreenHopper said^ yes it does... and to satisfy the purists... if you have cinnamon powder that you buy, it is possible that it has been produced with several varieties of cinnamon.. including other varieties than true cinnamon... these other varieties should not be over-used because some, in addition to the health benefits, can have a side effect of thinning the blood... true cinnamon is the safest variety and does not carry that risk, but it may not be available in powdered form... nonetheless.. if you dont overuse the powdered cinnamon, you will have no problem...




    All varieties of cinnamon have basically the same chemical components that provide claimed health benefits. Just as most varieties of oranges provide vitamin C.
    Although, for nausea and vomiting, it is best to chew on a piece of ginger(not a big piece). I prefer to sip on ginger beer over chipped ice.
    Many spices have pharmacological effects. And just like common drugs, too much can be a bad thing(Just eat a bunch of whole nutmegs if you doubt it!).


    Yes they do... what Im talking about are the potential harmful side effects... Cassia or Chinese cinnamon contains larger amounts of Coumarin... which is a blood thinner
  • calibro Posts: 8888
    QUOTE Dec 28, 2011 9:22 AM GMT
    GreenHopper said
    rankoutsider said
    GreenHopper said^ yes it does... and to satisfy the purists... if you have cinnamon powder that you buy, it is possible that it has been produced with several varieties of cinnamon.. including other varieties than true cinnamon... these other varieties should not be over-used because some, in addition to the health benefits, can have a side effect of thinning the blood... true cinnamon is the safest variety and does not carry that risk, but it may not be available in powdered form... nonetheless.. if you dont overuse the powdered cinnamon, you will have no problem...




    All varieties of cinnamon have basically the same chemical components that provide claimed health benefits. Just as most varieties of oranges provide vitamin C.
    Although, for nausea and vomiting, it is best to chew on a piece of ginger(not a big piece). I prefer to sip on ginger beer over chipped ice.
    Many spices have pharmacological effects. And just like common drugs, too much can be a bad thing(Just eat a bunch of whole nutmegs if you doubt it!).


    Yes they do... what Im talking about are the potential harmful side effects... Cassia or Chinese cinnamon contains larger amounts of Coumarin... which is a blood thinner


    and that's the other point. chemically, because they're related but not the same, they're not identical so even though they overlap in beneficial qualities, they don't achieve all of the same results, particularly the coumarin difference you pointed out.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 28, 2011 4:19 PM GMT
    ^ of course, cali icon_rolleyes.gif thats why I put that there.. just to satisfy you
  • calibro Posts: 8888
    QUOTE Dec 28, 2011 5:23 PM GMT
    GreenHopper said^ of course, cali icon_rolleyes.gif thats why I put that there.. just to satisfy you


    well, here's what you didn't put (not necessarily bad, but in answer to your post in reference to cassia)

    "Cassia cinnamon is a plant. People use the bark and flower for medicine.

    Cassia cinnamon is used for many conditions, but so far science has not confirmed that it is effective for any of them. Research does show, however, that it is probably not effective for lowering blood sugar in type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

    In addition to diabetes, Cassia cinnamon is used for gas (flatulence), muscle and stomach spasms, preventing nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, infections, the common cold, and loss of appetite.

    Some people use it for erectile dysfunction (ED), hernia, bed-wetting, joint conditions, menopausal symptoms, menstrual problems, and to cause abortions. Cassia cinnamon is also used for chest pain, kidney disorders, high blood pressure, cramps, cancer, and as a “blood purifier.”

    Cassia cinnamon is used in suntan lotions, nasal sprays, mouthwashes, gargles, toothpaste, and as a “counterirritant” applied to the skin in liniments. A counterirritant is a substance that creates pain and swelling at the point of application with the goal of lessening pain and swelling at another location.

    In food and beverages, cassia cinnamon is used as a flavoring agent.

    There are a lot of different types of cinnamon. Cinnamomum verum (Ceylon cinnamon) is the type used most commonly in the Western world. Cinnamomum aromaticum (Cassia cinnamon or Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly used. In many cases, the cinnamon spice purchased in food stores contains a combination of these different types of cinnamon. So far, only cassia cinnamon has been shown to have any effect on blood sugar in humans. However, Cinnamomum verum also contains the ingredient thought to be responsible for lowering blood sugar. See the separate listing for Cinnamon bark.

    Cassia cinnamon contains the chemical cinnamaldehyde, which might have activity against bacteria and fungi."
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 28, 2011 5:30 PM GMT
    arguing over cinnamon?
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 28, 2011 5:36 PM GMT
    7Famark saidarguing over cinnamon?


    Not really.... arguing over cassia.. he would say icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 28, 2011 5:39 PM GMT
    calibro said
    GreenHopper said^ of course, cali icon_rolleyes.gif thats why I put that there.. just to satisfy you


    well, here's what you didn't put (not necessarily bad, but in answer to your post in reference to cassia)


    Webmd.. very interesting mate
  • MuchMoreThanM... Posts: 21497
    QUOTE Dec 28, 2011 6:32 PM GMT
    Cinnamon is so good for you. It helps to stabilize blood sugar levels and might offer benefits to people who are borderline diabetic. I can also find scholarly articles on how improves insulin resistance.

    Fresher breath, tasty, lowered insulin resistance. I'm sold! icon_exclaim.gificon_exclaim.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Dec 28, 2011 7:26 PM GMT
    Very interesting Greenhopper, thanks for posting this icon_smile.gif. I always put cinnamon, or some type of spice like curry, on my foods but never thought about the cinnamon sticks. Definitely will keep this in mind for the future.

    And...why did Calibro feel the need to put his obnoxious two cents in? Oh I remember, he thinks he knows FUCKING EVERYTHING.