What % of gays do you think are professionals? MD, JD, MBA, etc.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 31, 2011 3:24 PM GMT
    Also what % of the guys on here?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 31, 2011 3:45 PM GMT
    I'm guessing not too many professors of Physics on here.
  • HndsmKansan

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    Dec 31, 2011 3:49 PM GMT
    Well be careful about the "inclusion or exclusion" of those you categorize as "professioinals".... there are many.. who may or may not have those credentials.

    I have my JD, and I'd assume it's about 10% here and public at large.
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    Dec 31, 2011 4:02 PM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidWell be careful about the "inclusion or exclusion" of those you categorize as "professioinals".... there are many.. who may or may not have those credentials.

    I have my JD, and I'd assume it's about 10% here and public at large.


    So you think gays have higher education in exactly the same proportion as the public?
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    Dec 31, 2011 4:58 PM GMT
    ?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 31, 2011 5:20 PM GMT
    Come on guys! Can't we have one thread that isn't some version of would you take the guy above you or...
  • gcoastmark

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    Dec 31, 2011 6:29 PM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidWell be careful about the "inclusion or exclusion" of those you categorize as "professioinals".... there are many.. who may or may not have those credentials.

    I have my JD, and I'd assume it's about 10% here and public at large.


    Actually, while I'm not a lawyer, I've come across many both socially and professionally that are gay. I'd be surprised if it was that low - maybe because of where I live...
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    Dec 31, 2011 6:29 PM GMT
    swimguychicago saidCome on guys! Can't we have one thread that isn't some version of would you take the guy above you or...


    I dont think many people want to participate in a thread in which we exclude others based on their educational standing.

    That being said, not all professionals are professional at all, and it gets to be a wishy washy area. Like would you consider a photographer a professional? How about a Chiropractor? How about a fortune teller?

    These are all jobs that take a skill level to do, whether they are truly professional or not is up to the individual to decide.

    Lets have more inclusive threads and less exclusive.
  • gcoastmark

    Posts: 83

    Dec 31, 2011 6:31 PM GMT
    gcoastmark said
    HndsmKansan saidWell be careful about the "inclusion or exclusion" of those you categorize as "professioinals".... there are many.. who may or may not have those credentials.

    I have my JD, and I'd assume it's about 10% here and public at large.


    Actually, while I'm not a lawyer, I've come across many both socially and professionally that are gay. I'd be surprised if it was that low - maybe because of where I live...


    ...I'd say probably anyone with a college degree so whatever that percentage is....what...husband shopping?
    ;-)
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    Dec 31, 2011 6:31 PM GMT
    77% and 92% respectively icon_smile.gif
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    Dec 31, 2011 6:31 PM GMT
    I think you should revise what you consider a "professional."

    I have my JD, and I'd say many of my fellow attorneys are complete asshats. On the other hand, I've met some incredibly professional, courteous and intelligent people who have what I think you would consider a "blue-collar" profession. Just because you don't have a degree and wear a suit every day doesn't mean you're not professional.

    However, I am awesome icon_smile.gif
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    Dec 31, 2011 6:32 PM GMT
    gcoastmark said
    gcoastmark said
    HndsmKansan saidWell be careful about the "inclusion or exclusion" of those you categorize as "professioinals".... there are many.. who may or may not have those credentials.

    I have my JD, and I'd assume it's about 10% here and public at large.


    Actually, while I'm not a lawyer, I've come across many both socially and professionally that are gay. I'd be surprised if it was that low - maybe because of where I live...


    ...I'd say probably anyone with a college degree so whatever that percentage is....what...husband shopping?
    ;-)


    Did you really just quote yourself man?
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    Dec 31, 2011 6:34 PM GMT
    swimguychicago saidI'm guessing not too many professors of Physics on here.


    Are you a Physics prof?

    I'm a future Ph.D.
  • Lawrencium

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    Dec 31, 2011 6:39 PM GMT
    I think the OP was simply saying professionals, to refer to people who have earned "professional degrees." It's a good question but to clarify... wiki say dat:

    A professional degree prepares the holder for a particular profession by emphasizing competency skills along with theory and analysis. These professions are typically licensed or otherwise regulated by a governmental or government-approved body. Areas such as nursing, clinical laboratory science, architecture, law, landscape architecture, public policy, medicine, osteopathic medicine, veterinary medicine, chiropractic, engineering, dentistry, psychology, accounting, podiatry, audiology, speech-language pathology, physical therapy, optometry, radiography, pharmacy, social work, or education, among others, often require such degrees for licensing.

    So, fortune tellers prooooobably would not be included.
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    Dec 31, 2011 6:43 PM GMT
    larse88 saidI think the OP was simply saying professionals, to refer to people who have earned "professional degrees." It's a good question but to clarify... wiki say dat:

    A professional degree prepares the holder for a particular profession by emphasizing competency skills along with theory and analysis. These professions are typically licensed or otherwise regulated by a governmental or government-approved body. Areas such as nursing, clinical laboratory science, architecture, law, landscape architecture, public policy, medicine, osteopathic medicine, veterinary medicine, chiropractic, engineering, dentistry, psychology, accounting, podiatry, audiology, speech-language pathology, physical therapy, optometry, radiography, pharmacy, social work, or education, among others, often require such degrees for licensing.

    So, fortune tellers prooooobably would not be included.


    According to Wikipedia brah.

    Seriously though, like I said, the lines of professional are wishy washy. Wikipedia calls Chiropractors a professional, I call them frauds. Simple enough.
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    Dec 31, 2011 6:47 PM GMT
    Young_Sir saidI think you should revise what you consider a "professional."

    I have my JD, and I'd say many of my fellow attorneys are complete asshats. On the other hand, I've met some incredibly professional, courteous and intelligent people who have what I think you would consider a "blue-collar" profession. Just because you don't have a degree and wear a suit every day doesn't mean you're not professional.

    However, I am awesome icon_smile.gif


    Warning... rant below:

    I have never wanted to work a "blue collar" job--never. I'd be so unhappy. But i respect those who do have such jobs. I wouldn't know how to build a house, fix a sink, or rewire my apartment. I wouldn't know how to work in a factory making the toilet paper I use to wipe my ass. And I wouldn't be able to log/mine/harvest the hundreds of raw materials used to make nearly everything I come in contact with each day.

    I am of the opinion that not everyone should go on to traditional college--not everyone is meant to go to college, and I am not meant to do physical labor like my father and grandfathers. But without them... I wouldn't be able to do the things I enjoy. Blue collar, pink collar, white collar, intellectuals, rough necks, professionals, laborers, etc... we all need each other.
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    Dec 31, 2011 6:48 PM GMT
    swimguychicago saidCome on guys! Can't we have one thread that isn't some version of would you take the guy above you or...


    How exactly is this any different?

    Although for the record, I think it is important to have more visible Professional Gays.

    The Amateur Gays never seem to get it right and just make the rest of us look bad.
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    Dec 31, 2011 6:49 PM GMT
    Cash said
    swimguychicago saidCome on guys! Can't we have one thread that isn't some version of would you take the guy above you or...


    How exactly is this any different?

    Although for the record, I think it is important to have more visible Professional Gays.

    The Amateur Gays never seem to get it right and just make the rest of us look bad.


    I agree, if all gay men would just put on a suit and tie we would have equality by now.
  • IdkMyBffJill

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    Dec 31, 2011 6:50 PM GMT
    Maybe what you are asking is: "What % of RJ members/the gay population/the general population have achieved a professional degree?"

    May leave less room for interpretation? IDK.
  • Lawrencium

    Posts: 63

    Dec 31, 2011 6:52 PM GMT
    Wiki isn't exactly a bullshit source anymore, a lot of undergraduate universities now accept wikipedia as a source (still, I agree, taken with a grain of salt).

    Just trying to point out that what defines a "professional" degree isn't defined by what a person does or how professionally they do it, but what training they went through to be able to do that career.
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    Dec 31, 2011 7:07 PM GMT
    I am a retired professional, however, I never considered myself to be above any blue collar worker and I did that work and was a member of a union in the early part of my adult life.

    I am not sure why you are interested in attaining this information and the folks that will be attracted to this thread will be an inaccurate cross section so statistically, unless some guy comes up with a source for this info, your thread will be just a curiousity.

    As a curiousity, I would guess that the percentage of professionals among the gay population is less than that in the whole. I think this might be true because there is more self hatred and low self esteem amongst gay men for obvious reasons and therefore they would be less likely to have the confidence necessary to graduate from some program and pass the difficult tests necessary to achieve a licence to practice in the field.
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    Dec 31, 2011 7:08 PM GMT
    larse88 saidI think the OP was simply saying professionals, to refer to people who have earned "professional degrees." It's a good question but to clarify... wiki say dat:

    A professional degree prepares the holder for a particular profession by emphasizing competency skills along with theory and analysis. These professions are typically licensed or otherwise regulated by a governmental or government-approved body. Areas such as nursing, clinical laboratory science, architecture, law, landscape architecture, public policy, medicine, osteopathic medicine, veterinary medicine, chiropractic, engineering, dentistry, psychology, accounting, podiatry, audiology, speech-language pathology, physical therapy, optometry, radiography, pharmacy, social work, or education, among others, often require such degrees for licensing.

    So, fortune tellers prooooobably would not be included.


    This is PFS. If a "professional" is a job requiring a government license, then every kid flipping burgers is a professional. Most people who loudly call themselves "professionals" do so on the basis that they wear a clown costume and shuffle papers that have no purpose, or that could be processed much more efficiently by a very simple computer program. It's sort of a diversionary tactic.
  • mikeeugene

    Posts: 84

    Dec 31, 2011 7:10 PM GMT
    There should be a roughly equal percentage of homosexually active males across all educational levels and career fields. Some of them don't consider themselves "gay", others do, but don't advertise it, due to family, cultural, or career reasons.
    There's definitely going to be a lower number of police officers, military, etc, who are out to the general public.
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    Dec 31, 2011 7:33 PM GMT
    Whater the exact percentage, it's relatively high.

    No time right now to look up the stats, but there's quite a bit of market research and academic sociology research that consistently shows that among men with advanced degrees, a higher percentage identify as LGBT than they do among the general population.
  • dancedancekj

    Posts: 1761

    Dec 31, 2011 7:40 PM GMT
    I have often theorized that if gay men do not have children (and perhaps also remain single, given the relatively low rate of monogamy I have observed thus far icon_razz.gif) then gay men are essentially able to focus and expend more time and energy on their professions and careers. Therefore it wouldn't surprise me if a higher proportion of gay men were.