Gain the weight before working out? or vice versa?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 25, 2007 5:01 AM GMT
    So, I am currently 140 lbs, would like to get bigger/ fit and toned I've started working out and building muscle however i'm wondering if I should gain the weight before I start lifting etc. otherwise I'm afraid all the work i've done will just be burned away by the new muscle and in the end, getting me no where?

    another question

    I've gained upper body strength in the form of muscle etc. I can tell i've gained it in areas like pecs, arms, etc, however it seems like my neck is still skinny haha! is there any work out to bulk up in the neck area???
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    Jul 08, 2008 9:18 PM GMT
    Hey Derek.. Don`t know if it helps but my neighbour(5ft 7in, 30in waist, 41in chest and 22in arms) is a body builder and he does a strict diet(not sure what it is). But anyway, I am an overweight guy(more than a few pounds) and he said that having extra weight will help out with gaining muscle mass because your body and muscles will use the fat as a fuel. He has a home gym in his garage and it has pretty much everything that a gym that you would go to has and I have been over there working out with him every couple days and I have noticed that my fat has gone down considerably over the past few months and I have gained a fair bit of muscle mass. And as far as having mass around the neck area it will come overtime(so I hear).

    Hope this helps you...

    Jamie
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    Jul 08, 2008 11:33 PM GMT
    There are some machines you can use to work your neck muscles, but I've only seen them in one gym and that was for football. Otherwise there are harness's to work your neck... but I've never used one, it looks to painful.
  • NYCguy74

    Posts: 311

    Jul 09, 2008 12:14 AM GMT
    I would try to gain weight while working out. Eat, limit your cardio, eat, oh and Eat. So work on packing on some muscle mass, just be aware that some fat may come along with it. as opposed to slacking off on the weights, and eating a lot.
    On weights focus on more multi-joint exercises, like squats, deadlift as opposed to single joint like tricep extensions or leg curls.
    When you do multi-joint exercises, more muscle groups are used per exercise, stimulating growth throughout the entire body -- including your arms -- due to the release of anabolic (muscle-building) testosterone and growth hormone. plus you get in and out of the gym faster, meaning you're spending less time burning energy.

    more examples are barbell rows, overhead (shoulder) presses, pulldowns, dips, lunges, pushups, and dumbbell rows
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 09, 2008 3:37 AM GMT
    Bro you definitely want to gain the weight as muscle, another words at the same time. Here is why if you go and put on a bunch or weight before you start lifting the weight you put on will be fat. Contrary to the popular belief you will not suddenly turn that fat into muscle. You have to have a calorie excess to add muscle most efficiently. If you have a calorie excess you are not going to burn any of the fat, while you are adding muscle. Then what happens is finally start lifting and putting on muscle, but all that fat is still there, and it covers up the muscle giving you a big bulky look not a nice cut look. Then at some point you have to go into a cutting phase to lose all that fat that you gained. Invariably when this happens you lose some of the muscle that you put on. In order to lose fat you have to have a calorie deficit. This means you end up with 4 months of strict dieting, lots of cardio, and you lose some of the muscle you just worked so hard to put on. This is not good.

    The much better way is put the weight on as muscle and not fat in the first place. This means lots of protein. Protein is harder for the body to convert and store as body fat then either carbs or fat, it has a higher metabolic cost of digestion, and will definitely help you put on lean muscle. I recommend lots of lean meat, and a couple protein shakes each day. You need some protein first thing in the morning when you get up, immediately after working out, and some before bed for best results in putting on muscle. You certainly need some at other times of day too with meals, but these three times are critical if you are to get the best results in gaining muscle. You might try Optimum Nutrition's Pro Complex, it tastes great, dissolves well with a shaker and works well. If you are still having a hard time adding muscle then jump up to something like Muscle Milk.

    I hope this all makes sense to you. If you have questions let me know. Best of luck to you man.
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    Jul 11, 2008 3:26 PM GMT

    You can't build a house without the materials. Gain before you work out, but make sure it's all quality material, no shotty craftmenship now!
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    Jul 12, 2008 10:42 PM GMT
    Building the traps can give a much bigger appearance to the neck as well. A variety of shrugs work well for this. Dumbbell shrugs for instance, but very the position of them, in front, to the side and behind, it will help develop the traps, which in turn will help the neck appear larger.
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    Jul 15, 2008 6:18 AM GMT
    caperguy1980 saidHey Derek.. Don`t know if it helps but my neighbour(5ft 7in, 30in waist, 41in chest and 22in arms) is a body builder and he does a strict diet(not sure what it is). But anyway, I am an overweight guy(more than a few pounds) and he said that having extra weight will help out with gaining muscle mass because your body and muscles will use the fat as a fuel. He has a home gym in his garage and it has pretty much everything that a gym that you would go to has and I have been over there working out with him every couple days and I have noticed that my fat has gone down considerably over the past few months and I have gained a fair bit of muscle mass. And as far as having mass around the neck area it will come overtime(so I hear).

    Hope this helps you...

    Jamie


    Jamie,
    Sorry to contradict you, but your friend is incorrect. Weight training is an anaerobic exercise, relying on glycolysis for the primary source of ATP production. The initial substrate in the glycolytic pathway is glucose (a sugar) and unlike the aerobic production of ATP via oxidative phosphorylation, lipids (fats) and amino acids (proteins) cannot be substituted for glucose in this pathway. For this reason, fat stores cannot be utilized as energy for weight lifting. If you gain weight as fat before beginning to lift you will have twice as much work to do as when you started, because in addition to building muscle by weight training you will also need to burn the fat through aerobic training.
  • jhelling

    Posts: 168

    Jul 15, 2008 11:53 PM GMT
    I'm definitely going to have to agree with majority of people... You do not want to gain the weight prior to lifting. You will want to consume more calories once you start lifting heavy, though. I am in the process of gaining, and on a great workout program. I am mostly using BSN True Mass to help me add some extra calories to my diet, but it has also helped that I spread my calories out throughout the day.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 24, 2008 3:50 AM GMT
    DerekisHot said... i'm wondering if I should gain the weight before I start lifting ... [and] ...I've gained upper body strength in the form of muscle...


    Two really obvious things that come to mind are that people who gain weight without gaining muscle don't feel like working out, they're already carrying around weights they can't drop - and besides that it could lead to unhealthy eating habits.

    The chest exercises that can also help you with building muscle around your neck would mean working the upper arms in shoulder shrugs - I wouldn't isolate the neck for specific muscle group exercises just because I wouldn't want you to have unnaturally strained your neck in an exercise that your body wouldn't handle correctly - I've never heard of anyone carrying around an extra 75lbs of mass on their heads unless their neck was straight, making it work at an angle could throw your neck out of alignment and cause a prolonged stay away from exercising, creating a situation like the one just mentioned.

    Hope the holiday season has you feeling great and doing great!

    Cheers! (This is mostly what I can barely remember from phys-ed class experiences - I was distracted a LOT of the time!)
  • Zinc

    Posts: 197

    Feb 14, 2013 6:43 AM GMT
    UCSDcollegian said
    caperguy1980 saidHey Derek.. Don`t know if it helps but my neighbour(5ft 7in, 30in waist, 41in chest and 22in arms) is a body builder and he does a strict diet(not sure what it is). But anyway, I am an overweight guy(more than a few pounds) and he said that having extra weight will help out with gaining muscle mass because your body and muscles will use the fat as a fuel. He has a home gym in his garage and it has pretty much everything that a gym that you would go to has and I have been over there working out with him every couple days and I have noticed that my fat has gone down considerably over the past few months and I have gained a fair bit of muscle mass. And as far as having mass around the neck area it will come overtime(so I hear).

    Hope this helps you...

    Jamie


    Jamie,
    Sorry to contradict you, but your friend is incorrect. Weight training is an anaerobic exercise, relying on glycolysis for the primary source of ATP production. The initial substrate in the glycolytic pathway is glucose (a sugar) and unlike the aerobic production of ATP via oxidative phosphorylation, lipids (fats) and amino acids (proteins) cannot be substituted for glucose in this pathway. For this reason, fat stores cannot be utilized as energy for weight lifting. If you gain weight as fat before beginning to lift you will have twice as much work to do as when you started, because in addition to building muscle by weight training you will also need to burn the fat through aerobic training.


    While a great review of biochemistry, you're critique is not really relevant here. I'm not sure you can infer that the OP means weight training is where the fat calories are going towards. Rather, what is certainly true is that during the times the muscles are not in anaerobic conditions, lipids become a preferred source of energy. Couple that with an increase in muscle mass and increase in the metabolic demands of muscle growth and repair due to weight training, and you have a picture of increased metabolism over all, even with out aerobic work.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 14, 2013 10:00 PM GMT
    Perhaps a better question to ask would be should you cut or bulk first, the answer is whichever you find more difficult.

    If you are naturally skinny due to age diet or genetics try bulking (increasing calories you eat while doing something like 4 sets of 12 reps on maybe 6 different exercises targeting the same area of your body).

    If you want to lose weight around your gut area work on cutting (removing bad food from your diet for good, while doing a mixture of weights and some cardio. I also find supersets great for increasing definition).

    Once you are think you have gone too much the other way, change to the other method (you may never think that).

    Hope this helps icon_smile.gif
  • jo2hotbod

    Posts: 3603

    Feb 16, 2013 3:39 PM GMT
    Derek you want to begin working out first, no question. As you add muscle increase your caloric intake to continue supporting growth. Use "clean" foods to do this (chicken, fish, lean red meat) not junk food. You will see a difference if you are consistent