Personal Training Certification

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 06, 2012 7:33 PM GMT
    Hello,

    Are there any personal trainers on Real Jock? I ask because I am seriously considering being certified as one. Eventually I would like to go to grad school, but I'm not in the biggest rush to do so. Being a personal trainer seems like something I would enjoy but I do have questions:

    -What are the best/most legit personal training certification programs? It looks as if there are all sorts of certification programs, and, as I prepare to move to Cleveland, I don't really know where to look.

    -Is personal training certification worth it? Can I earn money with this kind of job or is it too bourgeois (especially in our current economic instability) or too small of a niche to be able to support myself?

    -If there are Real Jocks that are personal trainers, do you enjoy your work? I ask this because I want work that I will enjoy, or at least, find fulfilling.

    What hasn't been qualified is that right now I am only flirting with the idea of becoming a personal trainer. So I am open to any comments or criticisms.

    Thanks.
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    Jan 06, 2012 7:45 PM GMT
    it´s a gay fitness site. Naaa, there are no PT´s here icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jan 06, 2012 8:19 PM GMT
    dude, why have you never asked me this question? fartknocker.

    and i do wonder if there are any other personal trainers on this site. this place seems to have degenerated into just a queer high school lunch room with little to no actual fitness discussion. icon_cry.gif
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    Jan 06, 2012 8:27 PM GMT
    NASM is a good one. ACE is one that everyone excepts. There are a few more out there too. Do not do the ones that offer it as a online course. They are ridiculously overpriced and are not worth it.
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    Jan 06, 2012 8:36 PM GMT
    Using the advanced search option, do a search for "personal trainer."

    I'm sure you'll find one or two.
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    Jan 06, 2012 9:28 PM GMT
    Cogitor saiddude, why have you never asked me this question? fartknocker.

    and i do wonder if there are any other personal trainers on this site. this place seems to have degenerated into just a queer high school lunch room with little to no actual fitness discussion. icon_cry.gif


    Because I just thought about it now.

    And I figured you'd laugh at me. . .
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    Jan 06, 2012 9:30 PM GMT
    Cogitor saiddude, why have you never asked me this question? fartknocker.

    and i do wonder if there are any other personal trainers on this site. this place seems to have degenerated into just a queer high school lunch room with little to no actual fitness discussion. icon_cry.gif


    So I guess we have something to talk about. . . ?
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    Jan 06, 2012 11:17 PM GMT
    I don't know what it's like in the US, but here in Toronto most employers don't care what kind of certification you have and clients really don't care. My clients don't know that in order to get the certification I got I had to go to school for it while this other trainer took a weekend course. Employers are just looking to see if you have a certification and liability insurance. So in my opinion, go for the cheapest and quickest assuming that you do know your anatomy, physiology and biomechanics.

    As for money, you should probably find another part time, or maybe even a full time job when you are first starting out. I was making about $500/month for the first few months and even less for the first month or two. It was probably by the 6 month mark when things finally picked up and now I'm working 20 hours a week and making pretty goooood money. I started off doing group fitness classes, and from the classes I was able to find some clients to do personal training. And then from there it was word of mouth.

    As well, personality is huuuuge in this business if you want to attract clients. I would say it's even more important than knowledge. If you want to retain your clients you have to step it up with your customer service skills.

    As for the job itself, I love it. It's not boring and you're constantly meeting new people. It's definitely not stressful and group fitness can be a lot of fun. And it's always a great feeling when your clients accomplish their goals. The money is good considering the hours your work, but like I said the downside is how tough the start can be. A lot of my classmates aren't even working in fitness anymore. Also, the hours suck. Early mornings and working evenings and weekends. But it's a job that never feels like a job.

    Hope this info helps!



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    Jan 06, 2012 11:53 PM GMT
    I'm a qualified Personal Trainer but in the UK so I can't really help with US qualifications, although mine are valid in the US to train at gyms and peoples homes.

    In the UK it's very regulated... you have to have Level 2 (fitness instructor) to work in a gym and Level 3 (PT) to fully advise clients and devise sessions for them.

    You need to consider if the financial investment is worth it and I would say only do it if you're really, really passionate about it. I was lucky... because I'm a runner my gym sponsored me to do mine. I found it incredibly rewarding but much harder than a lot of people think it is.... the level of anatomy knowledge - joint actions, opposing muscles, etc - is pretty detailed.

    That said there are still plenty of crap PT's out there who don't go the extra yard for their clients to earn their money. To make really good money... you either need a niche or specialism, for example supporting particular sports, weight loss, etc. but if you're good, generally word gets around and plenty of my colleagues have a wait list of clients who want to work with them. Reputation is far more powerful than advertising. I have a

    It's incredibly rewarding, especially when you get clients who will work hard to get their money's worth. I tend to train bigger guys and I take absolutely no prisioners in the gym as they already have experience and that's what they need from me. I also prove we've achieved stuff by taking measurements, body fat tests, fitness tests etc. These clients are awesome to work with if you have a good relationship and keep energy levels high.

    But... most PT's get a high percentage of flakey clients who, although they say they're really serious about achieving, have no comprehension how hard it will be in reality. This applies however good you are. Drop out rates can be high so it's best to secure a minimum fee upfront.

    Bookings at my gym have not really been impacted by the economic problem but it's in an affluent are and all the trainers have great reputations and proven results. I know other PTs have been impacted.

    So... if you're really up for it, have loads of energy, are great with people and can cope with sometimes unsocial hours (when clients are available) it's awesome. It doesn't feel like a job mostly!
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    Jan 07, 2012 12:22 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI was a trainer certified by A.C.E. back in the 1990's. I burnt out on it after a few years. I almost tried to go back in that direction just recently and was going to have to retake a certification. I tried to see myself six to twelve months into the future and after thinking about it long and hard I decided not to go through with it again.

    My experience with clients is that they are flaky, will not follow their diet guidelines and they fucking dragged me down with their pessimism.

    All this malarkey about genetics and not being able to lose weight is a bunch of horseshit. All the clients that I had were friends of friends and when they weren't losing weight I would eventually discover how they were not adhering to diet guidelines. They would order gobs of fried Chinese food and eat way beyond their means.

    There is science that supports how people have trouble losing body fat or excessive weight. But it is not genetic, otherwise people in third world countries would suffer obesity. There is more science and research that backs up the optimal timing of foods and the types of foods consumed that positively affect body composition. People are simply not willing to make the adjustments in order to make change happen. Maybe it's a Midwest phenomenon but only a small percentage of my clients made substantial improvements. These were the ones that adhered to what I instructed them to do and/or eat.

    But to answer the question I think all gyms accept ACE, someone told me that NASM is good and ACSM is supposed to be exceptional.

    Good luck.



    Good point but I always reserve the right to stop working with clients if they dont adhere to what we've agreed upfront. Otherwise, it's my reputation on the line. I sometimes put this in writing.... it's miserable working with people who can't be bothered.

    It has been a real eye opener to me just how many people are so flakey and have no clue. But I remain positive as I now get to work with people I can really push and prove are achieving
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    Jan 07, 2012 12:25 AM GMT
    You're better off interning at a reputable gym/training center and going through the certification process they recommend. I'm not sure who's in Cleveland though.
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    Jan 07, 2012 12:47 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    FitSportsman said

    It has been a real eye opener to me just how many people are so flakey and have no clue. But I remain positive as I now get to work with people I can really push and prove are achieving


    Hey, it's Guy Pierce everybody! icon_smile.gif

    So just curious, did you notice a trend with American clients since you trained here in the states as well? Just wondering if you noticed any differences. If you did would you please elaborate?



    Not the Guy Pierce thing again!!!

    Not really handsome manicon_wink.gif

    The UK and US are a lot more similar than most people think.... although we're 20 years behind the US on the obesity curve.

    It totally comes down to the attitude of the client. I don't mind people who struggle but still work hard.... I will go the extra mile for them.

    The only real difference is a lot of Americans tend to be a lot more positive in their outlook on life generally and I think that can help when they hit the gym. In Europe, we sometimes joke about the 'have a nice day' approach but I would rather have that a million times over than the sometimes less than positive outlook people have in the UK.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jan 07, 2012 6:13 AM GMT
    HabeasC
    I received my certification from W.I.T.S World Instructor Traning Schools. It was 10 weeks Sundays 8am-5pm. The pratical exam at the end was easy, but the written exam was tougher. Questions came from a large text book and a few questions from lectures. Those who didn't study the book failed. You also need to take adult CPR for a real PT cert. I have had it for 6 yrs at the time the cost was 500.00. I took the course for my own edification, but I have trained a few friends with my knowledge. It pays for itself because you will never need a PT and if you have a few clients the per hour charge will make up the cost of the course pretty quickly.
    Just pick a PT certification that is nationally recognized and not some online BS one. If there is a gym or rehab facility you wish to work for ask them who they require/recommed.icon_idea.gif

    Good luck-go for it.icon_cool.gif
    There is one in Cedar Falls and Marshaltown in IA. Not sure if you live near there?
    888-330-9487 or Google them.
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    Jan 07, 2012 8:29 PM GMT
    HabeasCorpses said
    Cogitor saiddude, why have you never asked me this question? fartknocker.

    and i do wonder if there are any other personal trainers on this site. this place seems to have degenerated into just a queer high school lunch room with little to no actual fitness discussion. icon_cry.gif


    Because I just thought about it now.

    And I figured you'd laugh at me. . .


    i always laugh at you, when i'm not busy being angry at you, or when i'm busy just loving you. nerd. now i'm going to text you at even MORE inappropriate times.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 07, 2012 8:30 PM GMT
    HabeasCorpses said
    Cogitor saiddude, why have you never asked me this question? fartknocker.

    and i do wonder if there are any other personal trainers on this site. this place seems to have degenerated into just a queer high school lunch room with little to no actual fitness discussion. icon_cry.gif


    So I guess we have something to talk about. . . ?


    i am so going to be sending you as much spam as humanly possibly now.
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    Jan 22, 2012 5:33 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Trollileo saidThis is true. Hmm.... Refer them to a different trainer then. Haha.


    Heh eh...

    "Pardon me, fellow personal training employee. Would you mind if I dump this client on you?"


    i've done this, and i've also had it done to me. it is all part and parcel of the gym where i work (and the industry in general, at least if you work for a personal training company). the crappy clients do manage to weed themselves out though, sometimes with a little "encouragement".
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    Jan 22, 2012 5:48 AM GMT
    I'm pretty much in the same boat right now. Got a job working at a gym and I'm able to show people how to use machines and set them up on very basic workout plans, but can't do the real thing until I get a certification. ACSM is the one I have been working on, but there is a chance I may be able to get the AFFA certification on my employer's dime and not mine, and if that's the case then that's what I'll take. Either way, I know it's the career path I want to go down and can't wait to get started.