Does Obama change on public campaign financing bother you?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 12:38 AM GMT
    I am not getting the controversy here. He made his public financing pledge before he knew he could raise enough money himself.

    Since his campaign fund raising is from a huge number of SMALL contributors, and not some big contributors, it doesnt make him beholden to "special" interest.

    Why do you think?
  • swimbikerun

    Posts: 2835

    Jun 20, 2008 12:52 AM GMT
    Not a big deal. Sure, Obama has raised more than McCain but the Republican Party has a much larger warchest than the Democrats do.
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    Jun 20, 2008 1:10 AM GMT
    Obama said he would go on public funds if his opponent agreed to as well. But the problem with the system is that other organizations can operate without restrictions. These 527 groups like the infamous Swift-Boat Veterans for Truth can spend as much as they like attacking their opponents. John McCain has made it abundantly clear that he is not willing to step in and shut these groups up.

    I don't think this will be a big issue, as most people don't get the issue.

    Additionally, John McCain has been illegally raising money against public financing throughout the GOP primary. Obama could attack him on this, but again, who gets these issues?
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    Jun 20, 2008 1:11 AM GMT
    John43620 saidUmmm, Caslon, I don't get it, what are you trying to say? Were you drunk when you wrote that?


    It read like I was drunk, didnt it!
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    Jun 20, 2008 2:53 AM GMT
    Raptor saidto me, this doesn't mean anything. why does it matter whether or not he accepts public funding? are there more restrictions on public funding? if so, and i imagine that there would be, what are they? as big of a deal that the media is making about this and everything else unimportant, they haven't really discussed any consequences or restrictions concerning public financing.


    The Repubs are freaking cuz they wont be able to raise as much money. So they want him restricted to the lower public amt. With more money, Obama can out-campaign McCain, especially in the contested states.
  • SkyMiles

    Posts: 963

    Jun 20, 2008 2:58 AM GMT
    Nope! Somehow...just can't seem to get worked up about this. Ah, well icon_neutral.gif
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    Jun 20, 2008 3:07 AM GMT
    Colbert_Nation saidNope! Somehow...just can't seem to get worked up about this. Ah, well icon_neutral.gif
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>I totally agree with you !!!!! Now what was that McCain has been trying to make us believe? ---- Something about his not being beholden to "SPECIAL INTERESTS" ---- where does he fall in on this subject this week??????????????? It just eats the repugs alive that Obama is so successfull at reaching the public, and getting their support !!! YOU GO OBAMA !!!!
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jun 20, 2008 3:08 AM GMT
    McCain may try and make it an issue, but I don't it will become one unless there is something we don't know. I think Obama is prudent to capitalize on one of his strengths... and McCain lacks the ability to match, thus the 527 assistance.

    I think Obama will be ready.
  • SkyMiles

    Posts: 963

    Jun 20, 2008 3:22 AM GMT
    I am trying to get ready for just how NASTY this is going to get. The Repubs know they don't win on the issues, so all they can really do is slime Obama up, down and sideways. Don't take my word for it...go to the RNC website! McCain's not even on the front page, it's ALL Obama.

    That's kind of funny, in a tragic sort of way.

    But, I mean, John Kerry was a honest-to-God war hero with a silver star and two bronze stars, but Bush and Rove were able to turn him into a traitor and coward with their propaganda efforts.
    Damn! Even with McCain back in 2000, they went after his adopted daughter from Indonesia(?), and said she was a baby he had with a black prostitute, AND that his experience as a POW had made him insane and therefore unfit to command! That shiz is cold blooded!

    I can only imagine what they'll do to Obama and his family. :^(
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 4:15 AM GMT
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080619/ap_on_el_pr/obama_money_analysis

    He can do what he wants to.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 5:19 AM GMT
    It's a political move, and one that makes perfect sense politically.

    Do I believe when he says the current system is broken? No -- the current system may be broken, but that's not why he's doing this, and to say otherwise is political maneuvering like any other politician.

    Ultimately Obama wants to win -- as does McCain who is still smarting from 2000, and I doubt that McCain in the same position would do otherwise -- but then his political fundraising has been leaden so he cannot do other than accept what is given him.

    So there you have Obama being politically astute and McCain's response also politically astute, and we're back to politicians and their art of compromise as always.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 5:43 AM GMT
    Cable news will make hay out of this, but it won't have an effect on the campaign outcome. It's just airtime filler.
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Jun 20, 2008 5:56 AM GMT
    I agree Caslon. You know McCain would do the SAME thing if their places were reversed. It's a non-issue. McCain is just trying to get traction wherever he can. He just want to even things up given his troubles fundraising. So, given his slow start AND Obama's big war chest, can you blame McCain for whining?
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    Jun 20, 2008 11:27 AM GMT
    It simply means that he, like almost everyone else in Washington, has a price for which he will sell out a commitment he has made. In March, his campaign said:

    "Sen. Obama is pleased the FEC took this important step in preserving the public financing system... If Sen. Obama is the nominee, he will aggressively pursue an agreement with the Republican nominee to preserve a publicly financed general election."

    He did not do that. Makes you wonder how many other things that he says he will aggressively pursue have a price, and what the price is.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jun 20, 2008 11:32 AM GMT
    He's a party picked politician running for President. Nothing surprises me.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 11:57 AM GMT
    Well, I gave him $$ this morning...so more power to him.
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jun 20, 2008 12:00 PM GMT
    tanktop said, "It simply means that he, like almost everyone else in Washington, has a price for which he will sell out a commitment he has made. In March, his campaign said:

    'Sen. Obama is pleased the FEC took this important step in preserving the public financing system... If Sen. Obama is the nominee, he will aggressively pursue an agreement with the Republican nominee to preserve a publicly financed general election.'

    He did not do that. Makes you wonder how many other things that he says he will aggressively pursue have a price, and what the price is."




    You obviously have not read up on the story. Obama's lawyers tried to work it out with McCain's lawyers and they could not come to an amicable agreement.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 12:01 PM GMT
    Budweiser pays for McCain. Drink Heineken.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 4:36 PM GMT
    doesnt bother me at all. why would he voluntarily give up one of his biggest advantages? if he can do it on his own, dont be mad at him.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 4:47 PM GMT
    Actually, it makes me admire the guy. He's taking it to the people, where it belongs. McCain takes it to his wife (the cunt and trollop). She funds the guy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 4:52 PM GMT
    I understand the strategy (get lots of money from lots of people) but I think this will come back to haunt him, especially because he did sign a pledge before. I don't really care, but it makes him look like a Washington politician-- exactly what he claims he is not and what he's been running against.

    With these sorts of things, I feel like whether or not what he does bothers me is irrelevant. What is relevant is if his actions can be used to frame a narrative that traps him. And given that he already started looking like any old politician (which he is) at the tail of the primary, the seeds of the narrative have already been sown. It's going to be a nasty, nasty campaign and I'm not altogether confident that Obama will win.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 7:07 PM GMT
    tanktop saidIt simply means that he, like almost everyone else in Washington, has a price for which he will sell out a commitment he has made. In March, his campaign said:

    "Sen. Obama is pleased the FEC took this important step in preserving the public financing system... If Sen. Obama is the nominee, he will aggressively pursue an agreement with the Republican nominee to preserve a publicly financed general election."

    He did not do that. Makes you wonder how many other things that he says he will aggressively pursue have a price, and what the price is.


    Senator Obama did try to reach an agreement with McCain. McCain rufused to negotiate. He refused to accept the silencing of the 527's and that is why Obama decided what he did. McCain refused to negotiate and compromise and so Obama resorted to allowing the "public" to financing his campaign. That's what we, the small donors, are. The public. GO OBAMA!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 7:08 PM GMT
    And i gave to him this morning as well! we are well on our way to the 50k new donor mark!!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 7:38 PM GMT
    jjdayzSenator Obama did try to reach an agreement with McCain. McCain rufused to negotiate. He refused to accept the silencing of the 527's and that is why Obama decided what he did. McCain refused to negotiate and compromise and so Obama resorted to allowing the "public" to financing his campaign. That's what we, the small donors, are. The public. GO OBAMA!


    Yes, but this is largely irrelevant. The perception can be created that McCain stuck to his word and Obama didn't. Remember 2004 and Kerry-the-flipflopper? Thinking strategically, the reasons for negotiations falling apart don't really matter.

    I say this as a registered Democrat and someone who will vote for Obama. But my support of the Democratic candidate does not mean I can't recognise that renouncing the public financing system AND violating a signed statement is not good politically. It will alienate the people Obama is having trouble with most: working class people who already find McCain more trustworthy on issues (like the war) even though they may agree with Obama more (on issues like the war).

    It's a strategy thing, not a matter of principle.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2008 7:43 PM GMT
    [/quote}
    Yes, but this is largely irrelevant. The perception can be created that McCain stuck to his word and Obama didn't. Remember 2004 and Kerry-the-flipflopper? Thinking strategically, the reasons for negotiations falling apart don't really matter.

    I say this as a registered Democrat and someone who will vote for Obama. But my support of the Democratic candidate does not mean I can't recognise that renouncing the public financing system AND violating a signed statement is not good politically. It will alienate the people Obama is having trouble with most: working class people who already find McCain more trustworthy on issues (like the war) even though they may agree with Obama more (on issues like the war).

    It's a strategy thing, not a matter of principle.[/quote]

    Actually its highly relevant. If you followed the story, Obama never said that he WOULD accept public financing, only that he would try to negotiate with the republican candidate to preserve public financing system. McCain refused to come to the table and stated that he was giving free rein to those 527 groups, this is not Obama's fault and the media and republican spin machine are not going to be allowed to make it an issue. Those same working class people you think he is alienatng have already donated(over 50k of us since yesterday morning) showing our support of his choice to have the ability to combat the republican smear machine.