Injuries during Yoga practice

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 08, 2012 7:37 PM GMT
    Hi guys! I’ve found the following article about yoga and injuries and, although I think it’s a little sensationalist (starting by the title), I was wondering about injuries people might experience during yoga practice. Have you had any? icon_rolleyes.gif

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/08/magazine/how-yoga-can-wreck-your-body.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1
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    Jan 08, 2012 7:59 PM GMT
    Yoga and physical training is a very busy market place. One of the ways that you can stand out in it is by pulling the "everyone else is dangerous, you need to listen to me" card. It works because there is a strong layer of truth: many yoga postures are too much for western bodies at least for a long time. People go at them as a competition and hurt themselves. And many classes are too big and taught by people with too little understanding.

    The truth is that you could equally write an article called "How sitting in a chair and watching TV can wreck your body". It would be just as true and frankly it´s a much more widespread problem.
  • Lo3iondo

    Posts: 9

    Jan 10, 2012 3:23 PM GMT
    I agree with the above and with the article, but take into consideration that the article focuses on one teacher and 2-3 poses. The injuries described are horrific, but how many injuries have occurred at a gym? How many strokes occur per minute due to medication? Its amazing how long yoga has been around and how few injuries have occurred. Yes, it is growing in popularity and there is a lack of proper teacher training.

    If you have never taken a yoga class before, do not jump into a high level flow class because the paradigm surrounding yoga is that its made for everybody. Yoga is not just passive stretches. Instead, make goals for yourself and find a qualified teacher to help you.

    If you want to lose weight, choose an apple over a doughnut.

    If you want to alleviate low back pain, don't press up into urdhva dahnurasana.
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    Jan 10, 2012 3:34 PM GMT
    I've never injured myself doing yoga (& I've been doing it for 1.5-2 years now). I actually do yoga to decrease the possibility of injuring myself during weight-training (& pulling my back shoveling snow).
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    Jan 10, 2012 3:57 PM GMT
    I started practicing Yoga in 1996. I started in a class of guys and we had an instructor who was able to teach us what to do and what not to do. No injuries all these years. It is no different than learning to lift weights...........anybody needs some training so as not to do anything to cause injuries. Who would practice Yoga - - - - or begin any lifting without training?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 10, 2012 3:57 PM GMT
    Most of the injuries from yoga come from pushing too hard in poses your body is not ready for, as well as not leaving your ego at the door.

    I speak from experience.
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    Jan 10, 2012 4:05 PM GMT
    Just with any form of physical movement, one can injure themselves if not being aware and sensitive to the signals their body is sending.

    The article, while well researched, is entirely conceptual to this reporter. For example, despite Iyengar recommending the neck be flat in Shoulderstand, if the reporter had ever attended an actual Iyengar class, he would've written that an Iyengar teacher would NEVER let you have a flat neck in a Shoulderstand and insist you use 3 or even 5 blankets to prevent this.

    The most dangerous type of yoga is fast paced, Vinyasa. This is where most people begin but because so little instruction is given and the dizzying pace in which people move in and out of Asana, most have very little idea what they're doing. I'm a full time teacher (of an Iyengar lineage) and receive people EVERY DAY whom have hurt their shoulders, low back, etc. in Vinyasa (including Vinyasa teachers).

    This is a nice cautionary tale for people who try to force themselves into places their body is not ready to go... but a lot of it slips into silly sensationalism (the man who sat in Virasana for hours a day) and loses its original point of action.
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    Jan 29, 2012 7:42 AM GMT
    Are there any forms of Yoga that one would recommend above others?

    I notice there are a lot of Yoga+Pilates+SomethingElse being taught these days as "low impact" Yoga.. I've attended classes with 80 year old women who are there for thier pelvic floors and companionship all the way to ultra competitive Bikram classes...

    As SFYogi mentions, listening to the body and paying attention to warnings it gives.. as well as letting the body know where you're taking it into the asanas by "easing it in" and above all focusing on breath will help.

    I"ve tried Ashtanga, Hatha, Vinyasa, Bikram and a swag of "yogalates" - they all have thier pros and cons.

    My favourite was Ashtanga - where the teacher came through and adjusted us gently , or stood by us if he knew we'd need some assistance..

    I've got injuries from other sports which certain asanas (poses) have aggravated, but usually only because I didn't pay attention to increasing pain or shaking in the muscles.

    Peace