Cookware you would never buy again

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    Jan 08, 2012 10:49 PM GMT
    A lead in to the question- So most of our bakeware is glass, generally pyrex. The bf was looking for something in a cupboard and knocked a square cake pan off the counter. The thing shattered. Sounded like he had just cleared out the whole cabinet onto the floor. The dog (thank god) ran out of the kitchen to the back door, horrified. After locking the poor guy out back, and sweeping, vacuuming and wiping down the floor (there were pieces from finger size to splinter size and it took a good twenty minutes), we could finally let the dog back in. I have never broken a pan before, but that just turned me off of glassware forever.

    Anyone have a brand/material/type of pan they would never buy again? What turned you off of it?
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    Jan 08, 2012 11:03 PM GMT
    That's that nature of Pyrex and other forms of tempered glass. Those things "explode" when they're not heated evenly or get hairline fractures. There are lots of videos on YouTube. Pretty scary stuff. Also, the current generation of Pyrex glass doesn't have the same durability as the old stuff. I'm not even sure if Pyrex makes things anymore. I think they just license the name out to other manufacturers. icon_confused.gif

    Personally, I'm trying to buy less and less teflon pans. Apparently, there's a new form of non-stick pans out there that don't contain all the bad chemicals. But I'm a little skeptical at the moment. Need to do more research.
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    Jan 08, 2012 11:06 PM GMT
    Basically I'm against anything what Alton Brown affectionately calls "unitaskers" (i.e. any tool/gadget that does only one thing).
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    Jan 09, 2012 1:04 AM GMT
    I enjoy cooking and baking and have a huge collection of kitchenware, gadgets and gizmo's. Some just for the fun factor etc. Pyrex and similar glass bakeware isn't the greatest for baking. It's slow and heavy and prone to damage. The only "glass" type of cookware worth its salt is the original Corningware which is made of pyroceram and even it's really only well suited for casseroles etc. It's also the only one that can safely be used on the stovetop burners. It goes from freezer to stovetop or oven, microwave and right onto the eating table. But again it's heavy and cumbersome I think. It's much harder to find these days since Corning sold the line to a french company called World Kitchens. They still produce Corningware made from Pyroceram but hard to find. You'll still see plenty of Corning bakeware in stores but it isn't real pyroceram corningware.. it's just white stoneware so it cannot be used in the same way and definitely cannot be used on the stovetop.

    For baking you're better to get a good set of metal bake pans, sheets etc.

    Pots and pans and stuff.. expensive does NOT mean good quality or good results, nor does the fact that it has some "famous" chefs name.. in fact some of those can be the worst.
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    Jan 09, 2012 1:06 AM GMT
    for a lot of things look in catering supply places.

    Aluminum trays, cake tins and such are great to have, even heat distribution, easy to clean and most importantly, cheap and long lasting. The stuff you buy at regular stores using fancy none stick or stainless just don't seem to last and eventually they end up becoming pointless. I also get paper liners and what not, makes removal so much easier and for pans I use silpats

    for braising and such (or stews, casseroles bla bla bla) I like cast iron, it's hard waring, functional, easy to clean and looks good.
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    Jan 09, 2012 1:13 AM GMT
    beneful1 saidPots and pans and stuff.. expensive does NOT mean good quality or good results, nor does the fact that it has some "famous" chefs name.. in fact some of those can be the worst.

    ugh that Jaimie Oliver shit is abysmal, I can't believe he'd stick his name on it and even worse they plaster his name on the actual cookware it's self.
    Sorry but I don't like Jaimie Oliver that much.

    None stick is also a real horrible crappy should never have been invented crappy thing to do to any pan. You wanna cook an omelet and not have it stick, learn to cook an omelet in a stainless steel pan, even fry an egg in one.

    Yes it's possible, it's easy and you get better results because you've finally learnt how to cook properly.

    oooh and multi-gadget crap, do ONE thing exceptionally well and I'll buy it, not 10 things terribly.
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    Jan 09, 2012 1:26 AM GMT
    I would dismiss all teflon coated pots and pans with maybe a few exceptions for some skillets/fry pans. I have one teflon 12" skillet made by a company called Heritage. It's quite heavy thick black aluminum and looks like a cast-iron skillet and it's never worn out, it was a bit pricey at regular price of something like $79 but cookware is ALWAYS on sale somewhere and I got it for about $20. I've never had any luck with any T-Fal stuff or any Kitchenaid crap so I'd stay away from either of them.. They're too thin for frying eggs etc. and they warp.
    And to put out good money on teflon coated pots etc you're just throwing your money away because as soon as the teflon starts flaking you have to toss it out. Good stuff (not necessarily expensive stuff again) should last you a lifetime or close to it.
    Stainless steel with a heavy bottom plate is something to look for.
  • hyperionx

    Posts: 232

    Jan 09, 2012 1:27 AM GMT
    Is it wrong that I read the headline of this topic as "cockware" instead of "cookware"?
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    Jan 09, 2012 1:32 AM GMT
    hyperionx saidIs it wrong that I read the headline of this topic as "cockware" instead of "cookware"?


    no.. all it means is that you can't stop thinking about cock.. You're obsessed with cock. You want cock and you want it now.. icon_lol.gif
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    Jan 09, 2012 1:39 AM GMT
    I have my friend's hand-me-down Farberware stainless for most jobs, supplemented in the last few years with enamel-coated steel by Chantal. I'm pretty happy with those... easy to clean for the most part and foods cook evenly, but one of them got a little crater in it. I wrote to them and got a reply asking for pictures, so I'm hoping they plan to make good on it.

    I have very little non-stick... I use one small frying pan for scrambled eggs and our Foreman Grill, but that's it. I'm nervous about it getting in the food.
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    Jan 09, 2012 1:41 AM GMT
    I recently replaced my Tupperware with Pyrex because I got sick of the former retaining colors and odors from food. I transfer refrigerated food out of the cold dish into something else rather than put it in the oven to avoid an explosion.
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    Jan 09, 2012 1:58 AM GMT
    Go with All-Clad....best stuff around and lasts forever. Le Creuset is great stuff too.
  • zackmorrisfan...

    Posts: 300

    Jan 09, 2012 2:06 AM GMT
    My kitchen utensils are a mixture of Zyliss, Henckels and OXO Steel. I would NEVER again buy any of the OXO steel items as they have rusted (and fairly quickly). The Henckels stainless utensils look/work just as good as the day I bought them. For plastic, the Zyliss ones have held up pretty well too.

    I agree with midwest on the All-Clad and Le Creuset. For non-stick I have Swiss Diamond pans and Cuisinart Green pans and they are absolutely fantastic.
  • fitone

    Posts: 276

    Jan 09, 2012 2:11 AM GMT
    pyrex has it's place...don't blame it that you broke it. all clad is generally a high performer. have a le creuset dutch oven that we love. you won't regret investing in high quality cookware if you love to cook!
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    Jan 09, 2012 2:47 AM GMT
    lilTanker saidfor a lot of things look in catering supply places.

    Aluminum trays, cake tins and such are great to have, even heat distribution, easy to clean and most importantly, cheap and long lasting. The stuff you buy at regular stores using fancy none stick or stainless just don't seem to last and eventually they end up becoming pointless. I also get paper liners and what not, makes removal so much easier and for pans I use silpats

    for braising and such (or stews, casseroles bla bla bla) I like cast iron, it's hard waring, functional, easy to clean and looks good.


    This, infinity. Open stock at your local restaurant supply store is dirt cheap. As is cast iron. Ugly but functional, I say, which describes me perfectly. icon_cool.gif
  • neon4u

    Posts: 1152

    Jan 09, 2012 2:50 AM GMT
    I stopped stopped using non-stick Teflon pans. I use cast iron instead.
  • LJay

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    Jan 09, 2012 3:05 AM GMT
    Cooking is a lot like woodworking: Buy cheap tools and you will regret it.

    You certainly do not need sets. Shop around for the best items you can afford as you need them.

    I have some glassware, mainly oblong pans. It gets treated with care. I've only had mine about 25 years, so far.

    Also some All-Clad. Fantastic stuff and worth every expensive penny. Found several small pieces on sale and they are great for a few eggs, or small jobs. And into the dishwasher it goes, if need be. The three cast iron skillets I have cost me a total of about $12. Wonderful stuff.

    My cast iron dutch oven was a gift, but if you have to buy one, consider the Lodge enameled one. Properly used and cared for it should last, say, three lifetimes.

    Don't buy cheap pots and pans. Don't use cheap pots and pans.

    Don't get me started on knives.


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    Jan 09, 2012 3:35 AM GMT
    Ok, perhaps i'll clarify one small point... I dont store them above, it was on the counter waiting to be washed and he had decided putting it in the strainer was a good idea... Lol, I was more trying not to place blame.

    And its not so much that i didnt think it would shatter, its that when it did, it ended up everywhere and i would prefer not to repeat the nightmare, if only for the sake of my dog's paws.
  • LJay

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    Jan 09, 2012 3:44 AM GMT
    He means putting it the dish strainer to await washing.

    Among the other things you do not want to drop: an unopened bottle of champagne. They explode and take off like a rocket. We dropped one in a store once and found glass forty feet away.
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    Jan 09, 2012 3:49 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidOh a strainer is an apparatus for the dishwasher machine? I don't have a dishwasher so I didn't understand.

    I thought he was referring to a colander like this:

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQl7pzx5iHVXCIR_N2280O


    I won't get one of those (a colander) because I don't eat or make that much pasta anymore. It's totally a binge food for me.
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Jan 09, 2012 3:55 AM GMT
    T-Fal is an absolute joke. Worst cookware I have ever used.

    I have found a product, Technique which is sold on QVC, that I love and recommend. Easy clean up and cooks evenly. Wonderful!!

    Also, any kitchen gadget made by Kuhn Rikon (also sold on QVC---I sound like a spkesperson for the network...) is a must-have. Another great product line.
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    Jan 09, 2012 8:02 AM GMT
    lilTanker saidThe stuff you buy at regular stores using fancy none stick or stainless just don't seem to last and eventually they end up becoming pointless. I also get paper liners and what not, makes removal so much easier and for pans I use silpats


    Thanks for this information, but what is a silpat? I looked it up on dictionary.com and nada.

    I also like ironware but it can not be put in the dishwasher. I agree with the teflon haters. No matter how careful using plastic turnovers and such, it does not last.
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    Jan 09, 2012 8:41 AM GMT
    alexander7 said
    I also like ironware but it can not be put in the dishwasher.


    Why would you want to?
    If something is stuck, perhaps you overcooked it.
    Get it hot again, fry a few ice cubes, and wipe it out with a paper towel.
    Then pour a teaspoon of olive oil in it and heat that up, swirl it around to coat everywhere, and put it away.
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    Jan 09, 2012 9:47 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidPutting a Pyrex glassware into a strainer?

    I'm lost. icon_eek.gif


    No, you thought of that correctly. A strainer. Like pasta. We do not own a dishwasher, he was trying to free up counter space until we did dishes. I think the word that was being debated there is dish drainer... But the actual product is called a drying rack.
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    Jan 09, 2012 8:29 PM GMT
    alexander7 said
    lilTanker saidThe stuff you buy at regular stores using fancy none stick or stainless just don't seem to last and eventually they end up becoming pointless. I also get paper liners and what not, makes removal so much easier and for pans I use silpats


    Thanks for this information, but what is a silpat? I looked it up on dictionary.com and nada.

    I also like ironware but it can not be put in the dishwasher. I agree with the teflon haters. No matter how careful using plastic turnovers and such, it does not last.

    Hi Alexander, silpat is a brandname for a silicon mat that has woven fiberglass embedded in the mat.

    It provides a nonstick surface, you can pick them up on amazon pretty cheaply [url]http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=silpat&x=0&y=0[/url]

    I have ones for my bake pans in the same size I don't have any full sheet baking pans though because they wont fit in a normal oven