Car Buying Woes.

  • Greygull

    Posts: 282

    Jan 10, 2012 11:15 PM GMT
    So, Realjock, I am an idiot.

    Yesterday, I purchased my first car from a buy here pay here lot, I test drove it, took a look at the engine, and kicked the tires a bit and put 850 down on it and drove it home. Now today when I was coming home from work the car overheated and my mechanic thinks it's the head gasket, which isnt cheap to fix. What do I do?
  • kiwi_nomad

    Posts: 316

    Jan 11, 2012 1:11 AM GMT
    year, make, model and what engine?

    how much did you pay for it all up?

    do you know if it came with a warranty of any kind? (ie some countries if you purchase from a dealer you are covered for a limited period of time).

    I would at least go back to the seller and explain the situation and give them an opportunity to put it right.
  • car_crazy

    Posts: 3

    Jan 11, 2012 2:11 AM GMT
    first see what your contract says on any warranty. if none see what used car seller required to if you have a mechanical failure just after buying the car. most likely you are buyer beware. was it a new car dealer used lot our a reseller? sorry to hear of your car problem.
  • camfer

    Posts: 892

    Jan 11, 2012 2:17 AM GMT
    Call an attorney. Initial consultation is free. You will at least know what your rights are, if not what to say to the car lot folks.

    Next time: take the vehicle to a mechanic before you buy it.
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    Jan 11, 2012 2:31 AM GMT
    I'd go back to the dealer and be friendly and see what they can do? What year and kind of car is it?

    I mean if it is like a 95 buick....you take your chances on a car that old.
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    Jan 11, 2012 2:47 AM GMT
    Will the "Lemon Laws" not help out in any way? I know we have something like that here in KY, not sure if it's an every state thing or not.
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    Jan 11, 2012 3:15 AM GMT
    I would take it back to the dealer and see what he is willing to do. Any reputable dealer should be willing to help you out. If anyone buys a car from one of my family dealerships, they always fix it for you 90 days out with or without a warranty. If it came with an extended warranty, that may take care of it too.
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    Jan 11, 2012 3:16 AM GMT
    ULmatt saidWill the "Lemon Laws" not help out in any way? I know we have something like that here in KY, not sure if it's an every state thing or not.


    aren't lemon laws for newly built vehicles though?
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    Jan 11, 2012 3:24 AM GMT
    closer85 said
    ULmatt saidWill the "Lemon Laws" not help out in any way? I know we have something like that here in KY, not sure if it's an every state thing or not.


    aren't lemon laws for newly built vehicles though?


    That is true, but some states have their own lemon laws that include used vehicles that are purchased with a warranty. You usually have to take the vehicle in a specified amount of times for the same repair in order for the lemon law to take effect.
  • MCIC

    Posts: 211

    Jan 11, 2012 3:25 AM GMT
    Greygull,
    I checked what the Florida Lemon Laws cover and it does not look like it covers much of anything. You can look for your self at http://www.yourlemonlawrights.com/blog/post/2011/06/20/the-florida-used-car-lemon-law-a-consumer-protection-law.aspx.

    Sorry and good luck
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    Jan 11, 2012 3:36 AM GMT
    Here is a suggested battle plan....

    Before you start your battle, get the owners name and google it. Find out where he's lived. Visit the state department of corporations and find companies that he has registered, both dead and alive. Search courthouse databases for him and his businesses. Visit BBB and see if there are any complaints. All this should be online. Dig up some dirt. And with note lot owners...you will find plenty.

    Then call the dealer up and ask for the owner. Tell him you are going to return the car and for him to have your money ready. ALL OF IT. You do not want the car fixed. No deals.

    If and when he refuses, get angry. Raise your voice a few decibels and deepen it. Tell him that you are going to be a major, MAJOR, fucking heat case. Click off the names of people that have sued him, and promise him that you're going to be much tougher. Tell him about your good friend at a local media outlet....and that you're going to find the most pain-in-the-ass lawyer working on the case. If you found any court cases that he lost, find the opposing attorney's name and drop it on him.

    You want to do a full scale attack early. Most of these note lot dealers sell to uneducated people working two or three jobs, and too busy to fight him. But if he sees you as a Bit Pull with oodles of time on your hands, he's going to make a fast decision to surrender.

    Just for future reference...the objective of a note lot is to eventually repo. your car. Buy here pay here lots sell junk. Never buy from them, nor buy a recondition title car. Ever.
  • Greygull

    Posts: 282

    Jan 11, 2012 11:17 PM GMT
    Well, I took your advice realjockers. I checked the BBB and the owner out, He's not super shady but yeah I did get screwed. So i called him today and went down to his lot, which my car overheated again. Not cool. So I get there, i walk in and tell him I want my money back. He tells me that He owes me nothing and I could take it up with his laywer. I promptly called my bank and put a stop payment, I checked with the bank and because I didn't receive the services i was paying for I owe him nothing, and after checking with my lawyer if I returned the car I'm basically off scott free if he ever tries to make me pay for the car, As he took my down payment before I signed anything, meaning that I signed everything under duress and it's not legally binding. Or at least that's my understanding of the matter.


    So next time I'
    m headed to a dealership and my payment is back in my account as of midnight!
  • camfer

    Posts: 892

    Jan 12, 2012 2:23 AM GMT
    Great news! I have a feeling your next car will be better.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Jan 12, 2012 2:37 AM GMT
    In most places you can take the car back. It's the law.
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    Jan 12, 2012 2:44 AM GMT
    Don't be calling a lawyer and all that. It was an $850 lesson, which is a bargain for that kind of experience.
  • czarinaB

    Posts: 4

    Feb 01, 2012 8:20 AM GMT
    Making vehicle purchasing decisions can take a long time. Evaluations mean quite a bit in most purchases, but with regards to buying a car, reputation of the automobile producer actually indicates more. There are a large number of factors which must be considered when buying a new car. As the purchase is likely to be large in comparison to others made during day to day life, it's worth stopping and considering each point in turn. Survey says that car buyers trust reputation over reviews is a guide for you to decide. Vehicle buyers are also much more likely to consider the gas mileage, maintenance, and “feel” of a car than they are to consider the nationality of the car maker.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 01, 2012 1:23 PM GMT
    When the mechanic says the car is fixed, give the bill to the car lot, keep a copy for yourself, and leave the car at the shop. The car lot will have to foot the bill before repo'ing it.

    Then re-save and buy another car before they have a chance to fuck your credit up from the repo.