Hoarding and Hoarders

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    Jan 17, 2012 2:13 AM GMT
    Know any severe hoarders?

    Just watched an episode of the Hoarders show highlighting two different older women (70ish) with severe hoarding. As always, the "professionals" try to get them to sort through their own stuff. One older frail woman expressed that it's just too hard to make those decisions, and just get rid of it all. Her daughter was there as well. The show ended with both women failing to get rid of much of anything, and their adult kids in tears.

    OK, here's my take on this. What stupid "professionals" could expect someone that old to sort through thousands of items that they clearly have deep, decade-long attachments to? The proper solution would be for the kids to decide what's important and take the advise of their mothers to get rid of most of it. To expect these older women to see the light at the end of the tunnel (a clean house) is irrational.

    The follow-up text at the end of the show: both women lost their homes.

    Here's my hoarder solution. Tell the person "Your house is on fire. You have five minutes to go inside and grab what is important to you. Go!"
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    Jan 17, 2012 2:30 AM GMT
    Yes, I've been dealing with this for several years. After my Dad passed away, my Mom went off the deep end. I won't bore you with the horror stories. Now she's in a retirement home and the problem is a bit better constrained. But i still have a whole house full of garbage to sort through. And you have to sort through it... a pile of junk mail and empty pill bottles and dead mice may (and does) have, for example, the title to the farm truck somewhere in the middle.

    After a day of that shit, I come home and feel like stripping my own place to bare floors. Steve Jobs style, or beyond.
    1982b_dwalker_jobs.gi.jpg
  • BmwKid92

    Posts: 1097

    Jan 17, 2012 2:34 AM GMT
    watching that jawn on a&e rite meow
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    Jan 17, 2012 4:20 AM GMT
    Funny comment on the Hoarders Facebook page:

    "I tape all the Hoarder episodes on VHS so I can watch them later."

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    Jan 17, 2012 5:05 AM GMT
    I used to be a runner (takes breakfast, lunch or supper) for Meals On Wheels - volunteer. Up many crazy stairs in many tenements to apartments that are packed.
    Narrow pathways between square towers of newspapers, magazines and books, adding a precarious feel to things. Poor souls, I felt a sustained shock whenever I was with them. They were so lost! This seemed to be their panacea, their lifebuoy in an ocean of uncertainty.

    You know what? I'm going to shut up.


    Doug

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    Jan 17, 2012 5:12 AM GMT
    wrestlervic saidHere's my hoarder solution. Tell the person "Your house is on fire. You have five minutes to go inside and grab what is important to you. Go!"

    And if they still have a hard time choosing what's important, light their house on fire! You're doing them a favor.

    My grandfather was on his way to being a hoarder. He had dozens of violins and cameras.
    At one point he was renting a room from a family. He was sleeping on the floor so that he could rest the violins on his bed, where they were better protected.
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    Jan 17, 2012 5:21 AM GMT
    My grandmother was a neat hoarder. She held on to things from years, the majority of them being things that reminded her of her now adult children. For example, she kept paintings that my dad made 30 years ago and thought he had thrown away lol.

    What makes her different than most hoarders is that she packs and neatly labels everything she keeps in plastic baggies. So it was all organized, but it just became too much. Last year she fell and had to have surgery and my dad said that enough was enough. While she was in the hospital my dad and his siblings completely cleared, redecorated, and refurnished her home and it was a great surprise when she got out of the hospital and her home has stayed completely clean ever since.
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    Jan 17, 2012 5:24 AM GMT
    wrestlervic saidKnow any severe hoarders?

    Just watched an episode of the Hoarders show highlighting two different older women (70ish) with severe hoarding. As always, the "professionals" try to get them to sort through their own stuff. One older frail woman expressed that it's just too hard to make those decisions, and just get rid of it all. Her daughter was there as well. The show ended with both women failing to get rid of much of anything, and their adult kids in tears.

    OK, here's my take on this. What stupid "professionals" could expect someone that old to sort through thousands of items that they clearly have deep, decade-long attachments to? The proper solution would be for the kids to decide what's important and take the advise of their mothers to get rid of most of it. To expect these older women to see the light at the end of the tunnel (a clean house) is irrational.

    The follow-up text at the end of the show: both women lost their homes.

    Here's my hoarder solution. Tell the person "Your house is on fire. You have five minutes to go inside and grab what is important to you. Go!"


    My bf and I sometimes watch this show and I am often very critical of the "experts" in this show. The families so often seem to have contacted the show for help when it has gotten to a point where the hoarding is extremely severe and the owner has already gotten notice from the city or county and is just days or weeks away from losing their home. The "experts" walk in and their calmness and soft speaking does not reflect the urgency of the situation. They often accuse the family members of being enablers of allowing it to go on for so long, but these experts seem to be doing the same thing. With all the people there to help clean up, things often seem to come to a head with the family members, but the minute they start to raise their voice a little, the professionals seem to intervene and remove them from the situation. They've reached a point where there isn't any time for kind words and trying to get to the bottom of the issues making them hoard. They need some Judge Judy or Tabatha Coffey-type character screaming at them that if they don't get their shit cleaned up, the city is condemning their home next week. They can work on the therapy after the place is cleaned out and the home is saved from being taken.
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    Jan 17, 2012 5:27 AM GMT
    MolaMola said
    wrestlervic saidHere's my hoarder solution. Tell the person "Your house is on fire. You have five minutes to go inside and grab what is important to you. Go!"

    And if they still have a hard time choosing what's important, light their house on fire! You're doing them a favor.

    My grandfather was on his way to being a hoarder. He had dozens of violins and cameras.
    At one point he was renting a room from a family. He was sleeping on the floor so that he could rest the violins on his bed, where they were better protected.


    Light a house filled with violins on FIRE!?!? BLASPHEMY!!! icon_evil.gificon_evil.gificon_evil.gif