Cincinnati, Ohio

  • Blue128k

    Posts: 2

    Jan 17, 2012 8:41 PM GMT
    I'm 26 years old and am going to be moving to a new city next year. I have a few options at this point: Cincinnati, Boston, and Chicago. Obviously, Cincinnati doesn't compare to the other two in terms of city-quality, but the career opportunity I'd have there would be superior to either Boston and Chicago.

    I wanted to get people's input on Cincinnati as a city, what living there is like, and what the general gay environment is like (size, demographics, etc.). If it's a dismal city for lgbt, I'd rather go to Boston and compromise on my career opportunity.

    I would need to live there for the next 4 years before I could move again.

    Thoughts? Thanks a lot.
  • ohioguy12

    Posts: 2024

    Jan 18, 2012 1:14 AM GMT
    I've lived in Cincinnati and now I'm in Boston. The best 6 years of my life was living in Cincinnati, but honestly the gay life leaves a lot to be desired for. It was the same people all the time, and drag queens in your face everytime you go to a gay club. But besides gay life, Cincinnati has everything you could want.
  • BuckeyeJock13

    Posts: 44

    Jan 18, 2012 1:24 AM GMT
    Cinci doesn't have a great gay life, but you won't be far (90 minute drive) from Columbus which does have a pretty good gay scene. It's not going to compare to Boston or Chicago, but it's doable for a couple years.
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    Jan 18, 2012 1:26 AM GMT
    If you have any hope of dating, I would choose Boston or Chicago. But Cincy is a nice town, the people are friendly, and people come from all over to taste our delicious chilli.
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    Jan 18, 2012 1:27 AM GMT
    WKRP.. is an awesome station!icon_wink.gif
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    Jan 18, 2012 1:31 AM GMT
    I happen to be pro-Cincinnati. I think to describe it as "dismal' would be a little harsh. It can be stagnant at times. I have seen both Boston and Cincinnati nightlife, and they seem to be similar in terms of clubs, having to drive to places, and music. I think Boston definitely wins in the diversity realm (of guys).

    Do you have a list of things you want out of a city (in order of priority)?

    If the gay nightlife is top priority:
    Are you a smoker? Do you drive? I say this because Northern Kentucky is 15mins away from most places in the city (to add some other places to go out). If you don't mind going to "mixed" bars and parties, I think the nightlife isn't bad, but we have other things in the city to offer on the days you stay in. We are a city of up-and-coming YP's or "good ole" boy's club, so working here will help in your future, but you may feel anxious around year 3.25.

    Why not come out and visit for a while? There are economic places to stay in the city so you can try out the nightlife for yourself




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    Jan 18, 2012 1:39 AM GMT
    VibramRunner saidI happen to be pro-Cincinnati. I think to describe it as "dismal' would be a little harsh. It can be stagnant at times. I have seen both Boston and Cincinnati nightlife, and they seem to be similar in terms of clubs, having to drive to places, and music. I think Boston definitely wins in the diversity realm (of guys).

    Do you have a list of things you want out of a city (in order of priority)?

    If the gay nightlife is top priority:
    Are you a smoker? Do you drive? I say this because Northern Kentucky is 15mins away from most places in the city (to add some other places to go out). If you don't mind going to "mixed" bars and parties, I think the nightlife isn't bad, but we have other things in the city to offer on the days you stay in. We are a city of up-and-coming YP's or "good ole" boy's club, so working here will help in your future, but you may feel anxious around year 3.25.

    Why not come out and visit for a while? There are economic places to stay in the city so you can try out the nightlife for yourself




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    You're SO OPTIMISTIC! LOLOLOLOL

    For Realz, come here for the chilli.
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    Jan 18, 2012 1:42 AM GMT
    huhwhatFor Realz, come here for the chilli.


    Don't forget...
    Graeter's Ice Cream

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    Jan 18, 2012 1:44 AM GMT
    VibramRunner said
    huhwhatFor Realz, come here for the chilli.


    Don't forget...
    Graeter's Ice Cream

    icon_eek.gif


    How you been anyway, Vibram? You never IM me anymore!
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    Jan 18, 2012 1:44 AM GMT
    Ok, here's the thing.

    Cincinnati gets a bad rep. Mostly from people who live here.

    The secret to enjoying life in Cincinnati is meeting and knowing the right people. Cincinnati has a LOT going on in the arts, cultures, etc...but you'll never hear about it on the news or read about it in the papers. You'll find out by networking, following the right things/people on Facebook, and going out to try different events. I learn 90% of what I know about what's going on in town by having followed/subscribed/liked the right things on Facebook. It's been revelatory after years of trying to follow CityBeat and other traditional sources that are mostly out of touch.

    For example, the last sort of cultural thing I did was an art walk at a local artists studio complex. I'd been there before, just to tour, but never to an event. I had such a good time and met lots of people.

    Living in Cincinnati is cheap and convenient. If you live in one of the nicer city neighborhoods - downtown, Mt Adams, Clifton gaslight, Walnut Hills, Hyde Park, Oakley, Columbia Tusculum, Eden Park - you are close to lots of stuff. You can find cheap apartments old and new construction. You can find condos. Homes, etc. Almost every neighborhood has a coffee shop or two. I live 10 minutes from where I work. I'm 10 minutes from downtown. 20 miles from the airport. You COULD live without a car if you're willing to ride the bus, although that is more difficult after 8pm, as they severely cut back routes late night.

    We have great restaurants. I always surprise out of towners with recommendations and suggestions. Our 2 big museums are awesome - CAC and CAM - and I usually see exhibits at them at least 2-4 times a year. I hit the Aronof once or twice a year, usually for modern dance performances.

    As far as the gay scene...well, it's odd. Lots of closeted people here. Lots of married men creeping. But plenty of out young professionals in their 20s. (It's the 30something crowd that is slighter than most, as the city is teeming with 40something gays.) HRC and Equality Cincinnati are quite active, although HRC is something of a clique in many ways. Still, it performs its local function within national directive of the organization. We have our first out gay city council member. (We've had a few closeted ones.) We have probably too many bars and clubs. My friend and I were counting them up on Saturday and we have over 12! They multiplied after Ohio passed a smoking ban. We even have a very active skeezy leather/back room bar! LOL The gay community, if you can call it that, is rather...segregated. By race and class. Typical of the midwest. I'd actually suggest class is a bigger divider than race here, even if it doesn't seem that way at first glance.

    Cincinnati is a great city for runners. Great city for food. Lots of young chefs here, especially as Cincinnati State's culinary school has really ramped up its program over the past 5 years. Lots of cool new places like La Poste, Mayberry, etc.

    It's overall conservative, but that is more the influence of the suburbs, which are loaded with white Republican conservatives who fled the city in the 80s and 90s. The city itself is actually majority African American, although as a recent transplant pointed out to me, "You wouldn't know that from looking around!" But then he'd never ventured beyond his largely white neighborhood on the east side and the complex where he worked, which was also in a largely white Catholic neighborhood.

    Anyway, just some poorly organized thoughts about the city in which I've lived for 12 years.
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    Jan 18, 2012 2:03 AM GMT
    Oh, and Graeters Ice Cream is NOT all that.
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    Jan 18, 2012 2:05 AM GMT
    That (Above) is some awesome perspective on the city, and also coming from someone who obviously loves it. I'm not from the Midwest, and I spent some of my happiest years in New England. But I moved here to work, and that is my priority right now. If it's yours as well, then it really isn't so bad here.
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    Jan 18, 2012 2:06 AM GMT
    RunintheCity saidOh, and Graeters Ice Cream is NOT all that.


    I like it. I think it is delicious, Sir.
  • ohioguy12

    Posts: 2024

    Jan 18, 2012 2:08 AM GMT
    RunintheCity saidOh, and Graeters Ice Cream is NOT all that.


    I love Greaters, but Skyline is NOT all that
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    Jan 18, 2012 2:11 AM GMT
    ohioguy12 said
    RunintheCity saidOh, and Graeters Ice Cream is NOT all that.


    I love Greaters, but Skyline is NOT all that


    Wow, am I the only one? I go to skyline and spend 20 bucks on myself. It's like my Favorite thing about Cincy!
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    Jan 18, 2012 2:23 AM GMT
    One side of my family is from Cinci and I have been there many times. It always seemed very typical of the midwest to me- people tend to grow up there, and stay there. It's a very conservative city, but someone here gave it good thumbs up for the arts and culture, and it does have some great neighborhoods like the Mt. Adams district. I definitely agree with that. I like Cinci because it is quirky- the people there are nice, but definitely not plain. I also have always thought of it as a well educated city.

    But I think it is starting to suffer from some of the rust belt problems- so expect a very affordable cost of living, but not all the bustle you would get out of Chicago or Boston. It's also very industry-heavy, heavier pollution than most other cities, and my uncle there tells me that the traditional industries aren't doing that well and the city is struggling financially.

    I would still go there for a good career opportunity and the chance to get ahead on finances. But if you really must do the big city thing, you may want to go to a place that is a little more liberal and and outgoing.
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    Jan 18, 2012 2:24 AM GMT
    I skip Graeter's, LaRosa's and Skyline. I'll admit to going for donuts at Buskins on occasion.

    The city has better things to offer than some of its local chains.
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    Jan 18, 2012 2:32 AM GMT
    westanimas said But if you really must do the big city thing, you may want to go to a place that is a little more liberal and and outgoing.


    I always have to correct this one. Which is typically offered by non-residents or surburbanites of the metro area.

    The city of Cincinnati itself - downtown and the core neighborhoods - are not that conservative, with the exception of the "west side" part within city limits. The area gets a conservative rep because of the heavy Catholicism and the residents of the outer burbs within Hamilton County. Then there is Butler County (home of Crybaby Boehner) and Warren County, as well as Clermont County, home of that witch Jean Schmidt. The northern Kentucky area is a weird mix of kinda grimey urban areas (Covington, Newport) with more middle class conservative spots like Fort Mitchell, Taylor Mill, Crestview Hills, etc.

    But I live in the city and circulate with mostly city people. I know far more fair minded people than right wing psychos. Even the Republicans I know - which is surprisingly more than I expect, esp the gay ones! - are more fair minded than the mouth breathers of the northern burbs.
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    Jan 18, 2012 2:38 AM GMT
    RunintheCity said
    westanimas said But if you really must do the big city thing, you may want to go to a place that is a little more liberal and and outgoing.


    I always have to correct this one. Which is typically offered by non-residents or surburbanites of the metro area.

    The city of Cincinnati itself - downtown and the core neighborhoods - are not that conservative, with the exception of the "west side" part within city limits. The area gets a conservative rep because of the heavy Catholicism and the residents of the outer burbs within Hamilton County. Then there is Butler County (home of Crybaby Boehner) and Warren County, as well as Clermont County, home of that witch Jean Schmidt. The northern Kentucky area is a weird mix of kinda grimey urban areas (Covington, Newport) with more middle class conservative spots like Fort Mitchell, Taylor Mill, Crestview Hills, etc.

    But I live in the city and circulate with mostly city people. I know far more fair minded people than right wing psychos. Even the Republicans I know - which is surprisingly more than I expect, esp the gay ones! - are more fair minded than the mouth breathers of the northern burbs.


    Agreed with your last paragraph. Conservatives there tend to be old-school conservatives, definitely not neo-cons or social conservatives. Cinci has a lot of "old money," and it acts that way. But my cousins, both of whom are native to and live in the city itself, always seem to tell me how hum-drum life is there for younger generations, yet somehow they always stay and never venture out themselves.
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    Jan 18, 2012 2:42 AM GMT
    westanimas said
    Agreed with your last paragraph. Conservatives there tend to be old-school conservatives, definitely not neo-cons or social conservatives. Cinci has a lot of "old money," and it acts that way. But my cousins, both of whom are native to and live in the city itself, always seem to tell me how hum-drum life is there for younger generations, yet somehow they always stay and never venture out themselves.


    It's only humdrum here if you want to be.

    I'm rarely for want of something to do. Mind you, I have a wide social network and like to do a variety of things. But if you really want to do things in Cincinnati, you just have to put a little effort into finding out about them and enjoying yourself!
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    Jan 18, 2012 2:44 AM GMT
    i went to college at the university of cincinnati for five years- graduated in 2010.
    it had its charm.... but it was the charm of an underdog- the story of cincinnati is that of a looong fall from grace. the city can't get its act together, and every planning/development decision they've made over the last 200 years has been the WRONG one. seriously, the planning students use it as a case study of what not to do lol. there's little to no night life, no street life, almost no mentionable shopping aside from kenwood mall (which isn't special compared to the malls of other cities), and on top of it all, there's a giant ghetto (over the rhine) with race tensions in a very inconvenient location, and the city is surrounded by hours of corn fields. on top of it all, the dating pool is really, really, really small/sad- i was practically forced into celibacy for the best years of my life.
    i miss it- in the sense that i miss college and my fraternity/friends.... but yeah, don't make the mistake of moving there. you'll feel perpetually deprived.
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    Jan 18, 2012 3:04 AM GMT
    Sorry, but I live in the metro area, probably not too far from you, and I think there is alot of conservative thinking. People are cool, but when they don't know you're gay, they say things like, "gays are going to hell" or stupid shit like that when the subject comes up. I've already heard that several times already within the past few months.
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    Jan 18, 2012 4:35 AM GMT
    I grew up in the area. I return only once a year for the holidays to visit family. That's more than enough time there for me.

    The Good: Lots of pro and college sporting events, WEBN, Cincy Art Museum, Skyline Chili, September and October (only), driving distance from Chicago, very low cost of living, Xavier U and UC.

    The Rotten: Republican politicians (lots of 'em), conservative mindset (widespread), winter, limited ethnic diversity, Republican politicians (did I mention that already?).

    You're young, so 4 years in Cincy to advance your career would, in the long-range scheme of things, probably be a good idea. I'm not familiar with the gay life in Cincy.

    Good luck.