(Recurrent) Shoulder dislocation - How to deal with it at the gym?

  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Jan 19, 2012 8:19 AM GMT
    Hey guys,

    So to make a long story short, I dislocated my shoulder a year and a half ago by falling on my straight arm. I replaced it myself and as stupid as it sounds, I never went to a physio or health professional since I thought it'd just heal normally.

    I noticed my left side was slightly weaker, had developped in a different way, but I couldn't feel any pain or anything abnormal at this point (more than a year later).

    Three month ago, I had my first re-dislocation at the gym, while doing dumbell shoulder press. This time, it was really bad, hurted like hell and I got it replaced at the hospital.

    I've been into physiotherapy, made some exercices and my physio told me I could go back to the gym gradually, as long as I don't make any movement above my shoulders.

    It's been 2 weeks now, and I can feel it is still unstable and weaker (even more than before my first dislocation). When I do some chest press, I can feel my left arm kinda twitching and shaking.

    Have you ever had such an injury ? How did you deal with it ? How long could it take for me to be able to perform an all-out weight lifting workout ?

    I mean, I have a urge to try Crossfit and Yoga, but with this fucking left arm, I'm always thinking it'll never happen. icon_mad.gif
  • ArmsandLegs

    Posts: 125

    Jan 19, 2012 2:50 PM GMT
    Because you've dislocated more than once, you'll more than likely need surgical repair for it to become stable enough for that type of activity. You may just need therapy, starting at the very basics, and working up to the activities you want to perform slowly (4-6mos). Only an orthopedic doctor can tell you for sure, more than likely with the help of an MRI.
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    Jan 19, 2012 3:09 PM GMT
    Yep, if it dislocates then your capsule needs repaired, at the minimum. icon_sad.gif
    It will just get worse over time if you don't get it fixed. I've had two different shoulder injuries that both needed surgery.

    If surgery isn't financially viable for you a good physical therapist could probably give a good exercise prescription for at least getting it more stable. However, it might be hard for them not knowing what's exactly wrong, without having an ortho diagnosing an mri for you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2012 5:09 PM GMT
    My left shoulder has been dislocated twice. The first time was a three wheeler accident. The second time was doing overhead presses with a barbell. The first instance required orthapedic surgery, the second time a doctor was able to put the joint back in place without a trip to the hospital. Every case is different I'm sure, but I have no permanent issues with the shoulder that that been dislocated twice, with over heads or any other movement.

    Have you told your physician how the joint feels when you train with weights?

    That might be the best first step.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2012 5:56 PM GMT
    The first three posters have it right. You've become a lifelong member of the "Goddamn This Fuckedup Shoulder" club.

    My first dislocation was at age 16 when I was thrown from a horse during rodeo practice. I've needed 3 surgeries since then. Remaining athletic has been a double-edged sword; it helps maintain range of motion and strength, but things like rowing, snowboarding, surfing, ice climbing, etc. also continually expose me to further damage simply from the strain of those activities as well as from possible accidents.

    Living with a bad shoulder, you have to two choices, each with its own tradeoffs. You can keep it worked out and thus maintain strength and range of motion. But that usually means wear and tear, and a higher risk of future injury, and thus the need for additional future surgeries or rehab cycles. Or, you can keep it protected and minimize use of it in challenging athletic activities. This minimizes the risk of future injury and the need for repeated surgeries, but it also means living with a chronically tight and weak shoulder.

    Hope this info helps.
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Jan 19, 2012 6:36 PM GMT
    Thanks for your answers guys.

    Actually, the health system in Quebec is free, so the surgery won't be a problem. But since it's free, it's not quite perfect, and the waiting is long. Hence, I'm in the wait for an MRI right now, and it's probably gonna be 3-4 months from now. That's not helping me, neither my physical therapist.

    Hickram, I understand the logic behind your advice, but I've also been told to actually not stop doing ALL shoulder exercices because I need to strenghten the muscles around the shoulder joint so they can compensate for the injured ligament.

    I have found some exercices specifically for people with shoulder injuries, I'm gonna start doing this, and I'm also gonna chance my physical therapist since I don't feel like he communicates and knows enough about my injury...

    But yup, that MRI waiting thing is fucking me up a little bit icon_confused.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2012 7:01 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece saidThanks for your answers guys.

    I have found some exercices specifically for people with shoulder injuries, I'm gonna start doing this, and I'm also gonna chance my physical therapist since I don't feel like he communicates and knows enough about my injury...


    It would be great if you could share them. Merci!
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Jan 19, 2012 7:21 PM GMT
    Hickram said
    Disasterpiece saidThanks for your answers guys.

    I have found some exercices specifically for people with shoulder injuries, I'm gonna start doing this, and I'm also gonna chance my physical therapist since I don't feel like he communicates and knows enough about my injury...


    It would be great if you could share them. Merci!


    It's a pleasure. I found them on the forums anyway, it's somewhere else, thanks at those who posted them first icon_smile.gif

    Shoulder saver (16 tips)
    • Part 1 -
    http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_repair/shoulder_savers_part_i

    • Part 2
    http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_repair/shoulder_savers_part_ii


    • Shoulder rehab ViD
    http://www.dieselcrew.com/how-to-shoulder-rehab

    And "The 7-Minute Rotator Cuff Solution"
    Download on this website (you have to click "Free Download" and then wait 60 seconds before being able to download the file) http://depositfiles.com/en/files/f4eaw798n
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2012 7:35 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece said
    Hickram said
    Disasterpiece saidThanks for your answers guys.

    I have found some exercices specifically for people with shoulder injuries, I'm gonna start doing this, and I'm also gonna chance my physical therapist since I don't feel like he communicates and knows enough about my injury...


    It would be great if you could share them. Merci!


    It's a pleasure. I found them on the forums anyway, it's somewhere else, thanks at those who posted them first.


    Merci, mon cher! Vous réalisez que cela nous rend mariés maintenant... non?!

    But seriously, these look good. Some new stuff here for me. Merci.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2012 8:35 PM GMT
    For recurrent shoulder dislocation, avoid heavy lifting. Only light weights.

    Strengthen rotator cuff, scapular stabilizers, and deltoid.

    Avoid military press/overhead press or lat pull downs behind the neck (lat pull downs to the chest are ok).

    When doing any exercise, make sure you can see both of your hands in front of you at the same time. If you cant see both hands, modify the excise or dont do it.

    Dont do any exercise that hurts while you are performing the exercise. Keep elbows close to your side when bench pressing (not flared out).
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Jan 19, 2012 9:01 PM GMT
    catfish5 saidFor recurrent shoulder dislocation, avoid heavy lifting. Only light weights.

    Strengthen rotator cuff, scapular stabilizers, and deltoid.

    Avoid military press/overhead press or lat pull downs behind the neck (lat pull downs to the chest are ok).

    When doing any exercise, make sure you can see both of your hands in front of you at the same time. If you cant see both hands, modify the excise or dont do it.

    Dont do any exercise that hurts while you are performing the exercise. Keep elbows close to your side when bench pressing (not flared out).


    Thanks for this icon_smile.gif

    None of the exercice I do actually hurts, I just feel a weird sensation in the shoulder, like it's on the edge of dislocating again, or like it's struggling to actually do the push. More fear than pain, actually, I don't want it to dislocate again...

    But it feels like it's getting better and better; the feeling of instability during sets is slowly fading through my workouts as much of the after-workout soreness.

    Oh, and I will try that narrow-elbow bench-press !
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 19, 2012 9:05 PM GMT
    Sounds like u have a labral tear. MRI will give u more info.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 21, 2012 10:11 PM GMT
    I dislocated my shoulder a few years ago while skiing. I went to the ER, got an x-ray, and the doctor popped my shoulder back into place. Then I had to wear a sling for like a month and limit the motion on that side for a while.

    When you can go back to the gym, make sure to strengthen all three areas of your shoulder to stabilize the joint. You may have to use bands until your shoulder is strong enough to use weights.
    Also, I noticed that I was able to resume my workout using the seated chest press. My shoulder still felt weak and limited my workout on the bench press for a while.

    Also, I've done yoga after my dislocation. Give yourself some time.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 21, 2012 10:20 PM GMT
    I was being stretched by a trainer and my arm popped out for a split second and popped back in, ever since then when i work out i feel like its going to pop out again. Never has thought (knock on wood)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2012 1:27 AM GMT
    Lighter weights and more reps. You can still get a good pump.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2012 1:29 AM GMT
    I'm not a Dr... but you need a Dr.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 22, 2012 5:18 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece saidHey guys,

    So to make a long story short, I dislocated my shoulder a year and a half ago by falling on my straight arm.
    You shoulda fallen on your gay arm. It can take a much harder pounding.