Alzheimer's clue found in specific plaque

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 24, 2008 12:28 PM GMT
    The brains of people with the memory-robbing form of dementia are cluttered with a plaque made up of beta-amyloid, a sticky protein.

    http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/conditions/06/23/alzheimers.clue.ap/index.html

    I know about this plaque!!! I just read about it in the book, You Staying Young, by Drs Roizen and Oz. I love it when things come together. tee hee hee

    Pages 32, starting last paragraph, and continued on page 34 (page 33 is a graphic of the brain), it talks about this beta-amyloid plaque and the gene (Apo E) that controls it.

    Oh and guess what can influence the expression of this gene....tumeric (spice in Indian food) or EXERCISE!

    You_Staying_Young.jpg ... I am taking note of all the ways exercise can keep us young...I will be posting them when I finish with the book.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 24, 2008 12:46 PM GMT
    muchmorethanmuscle saidDamn, Caslon. Are you not working at present time? You seem to have an awful lot of time to read books and post dozens of posts everyday. icon_smile.gif


    As a matter of fact, I have suspended my work for 2 weeks while I adjust to changes in my meds. (I was willing to take vacation time, but my job wouldnt hear of it...what a company!)

    I think most of my postings are in the morning, while I have my coffee and check the news. And then again, in the evening, while I watch The Daily Show and The Colbert Report.

    I read myself to sleep.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 24, 2008 1:30 PM GMT
    muchmorethanmuscle saidWhat meds are you on if I may ask.

    I was put on antidepressants a year ago to stabilize me during the hellacious depression I went thru due to shutting off my testosterone in treating prostate cancer.

    My brain is coming out of the depression and physiological changes wrought by shutting down my testosterone.

    So the antidepressants that once had a stabilizing effect now are putting me to sleep. The dr unprescribed one of the antidepressants and I have taken these two weeks off for it to get out of my system.


    And I was also curious. What did you mean in another post by a 'survivor-to-be?' Are you not in remission yet?

    I know that it takes 5 years to be in complete remission if that's what you're referring to.

    Right, I havent gotten the "official word" that I am in remission. They wont be able to tell until the end of '08 or in '09. But I am pretty certain that I am cured. The numbers right now sure look that way.

    I had my last chemotherapy roughly 2 months ago. It seems like a life time ago. I'm going to start looking for work again soon myself.

    I had my last Zoladex injection in MAY '07! I refused the injection in Aug '07. I couldnt take the depression anymore. In fact, the personal trainer and exercising was recommended by my cancer dr to try to get me out of the severe depression. Then I was on Casodex pills for several months. Now I take nothing for the cancer per se, just the antidepressant that I hope to be off entirely by the end of this year.


    What is your cancer?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 24, 2008 2:49 PM GMT
    What? Pardon? What did you say?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 24, 2008 3:47 PM GMT
    I hope they find a cure before I get into the age group for early onset Dimentia...

    Even if it does mean i'm out of a job, its horrible to see intelligent one high functioning people loose there memories and then all control of there body.

    It's like you've died before your body has.icon_sad.gif
  • metta

    Posts: 39099

    Apr 04, 2011 6:41 AM GMT
    Discovery doubles genetic clues to Alzheimer's

    [quote]
    the new genetic findings look at new pathways that merit further study, including one that confirms a previous theory that focuses on the metabolism of cholesterol. Another important theme in the new research is that "innate immunity" is important in relation to disease susceptibility. That's the theory that Alzheimer's could be part of the body attacking itself because it perceives a threat to its protective immune system.
    [/quote]

    http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2011/04/03/discovery-doubles-genetic-clues-to-alzheimers/


    Common variants at ABCA7, MS4A6A/MS4A4E, EPHA1, CD33 and CD2AP are associated with Alzheimer's disease

    http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ng.803.html
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 04, 2011 6:56 AM GMT
    Sean85 saidI hope they find a cure before I get into the age group for early onset Dimentia...

    Even if it does mean i'm out of a job, its horrible to see intelligent one high functioning people loose there memories and then all control of there body.

    It's like you've died before your body has.icon_sad.gif


    It is quite sad however I don't think it all goes away perhaps the memories are separated by brain fog...

    A woman who watched me when I was just a child developed dementia later prior to her death and despite not seeing in me ages due to me not being home she distinctly remember me being in the Air Force when she saw my mother. She asked about me and such, however as my mother put it, she was very fragmented and it took a great exercise of patience to keep up, but it was apparent she never lost it.