Joe Paterno Dies at 85 Years Old

  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Jan 22, 2012 3:21 PM GMT
    Very sad that he had to live his last months with the Penn State scandal so much in the news and a black cloud over a program he spent most of his life building. He will never be forgotten.
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    Jan 22, 2012 3:32 PM GMT
    Very sad. RIP.
  • CuriousJockAZ

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    Jan 22, 2012 3:40 PM GMT
    It's pretty amazing how quickly he went once he was diagnosed. I wonder if depression played a role in taking him so quickly? I really think he was devastated by the Penn State scandal.
  • TheIStrat

    Posts: 777

    Jan 22, 2012 3:55 PM GMT
    Depression very well could have been why he passed so soon after being diagnosed. However, he was 85 years old. At that age, cancer can move very swiftly
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    Jan 22, 2012 4:23 PM GMT
    I heard he didn't die.
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    Jan 22, 2012 4:25 PM GMT
    Damn. icon_eek.gif
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Jan 22, 2012 4:27 PM GMT
    running11 saidI heard he didn't die.



    http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/football/news?slug=dw-wetzel_joe_paterno_obituary_012212
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    Jan 22, 2012 4:33 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    running11 saidI heard he didn't die.



    http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/football/news?slug=dw-wetzel_joe_paterno_obituary_012212


    Nah, just read he did. RIP Joe Paterno.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-400_162-57363500/ex-penn-state-coach-joe-paterno-dead-at-85/
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    Jan 22, 2012 4:33 PM GMT
    suicide, you think?
  • TonyD

    Posts: 168

    Jan 22, 2012 4:36 PM GMT
    truly a sad ending...so unfortunate in many ways

    what an extreme perspective...gave millions to the school, beloved by so many like no other figure in college sports, for such a long time, then dies soon after this scandal that rocked, if not ruined, his life.

    what could have been going on inside his head during all this?
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Jan 22, 2012 4:39 PM GMT
    sahem62896 saidsuicide, you think?



    No, lung cancer --- and probably a broken heart over the whole Penn State mess
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    Jan 22, 2012 4:41 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    sahem62896 saidsuicide, you think?



    No, lung cancer --- and probably a broken heart over the whole Penn State mess


    I don't doubt hat he had both... but man, after all this horrible stuff, I wouldn't be surprised if it came out that he did off himself and the family just reported lung cancer as the cause. It's the skeptic in me. Such a sad ending, either way.
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    Jan 22, 2012 4:42 PM GMT
    Anytime someone dies I reflect for a minute and decide FOR MYSELF whether they were worth any reflection at all. For this guy? None......
    I say this because, (unless I have my facts wrong), a sexual crime against a child was reported to him by one coward, not to the police, and then Senior Coward Paterno as well did not report it to the police. icon_eek.gif

    Yes...we all know about their (the school's), rules of reporting things. And I am all for corporate structure etc.....I truly am. I will always put my company's needs first above individual employee's needs. Mine included. But this abuse of a child needed to be reported to the police at once. Not to rely on the next stooge in the chain of command structure to do so.

    So maybe he died more suddenly due to the weight of guilt/shame. Now that would certainly be a just cause.

    It actually amazes me how some people are reacting to the criticism that Paterno and the school has been receiving. Even this morning I saw on the news students there boo hoo-ing over Paterno's death! Are you kidding?!? If that child had been related to them, and they found out that Paterno knew and didn't immediately go to the police? They would have pulled his plug!

    Like I said I am only basing my opinion on reading that he knew sexual abuse of a child occured, and he did not report it to police. To me that is a cowardly and shameful act. One of which he had an obligation to do. (Just the same as that McQuery coward did as well.)

    Tristan
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    Jan 22, 2012 4:43 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    sahem62896 saidsuicide, you think?



    No, lung cancer --- and probably a broken heart over the whole Penn State mess


    Sahem, the guy lived a long success full and more than likely happy life. Not to mention is was the child molester who actually committed the crime who should be more prone to suicide; if he feels any shame for what he did at all. Personally, Hate child molesters.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Jan 22, 2012 4:53 PM GMT
    musclefetish1 saidAnytime someone dies I reflect for a minute and decide FOR MYSELF whether they were worth any reflection at all. For this guy? None......
    I say this because, (unless I have my facts wrong), a sexual crime against a child was reported to him by one coward, not to the police, and then Senior Coward Paterno as well did not report it to the police. icon_eek.gif

    Yes...we all know about their (the school's), rules of reporting things. And I am all for corporate structure etc.....I truly am. I will always put my company's needs first above individual employee's needs. Mine included. But this abuse of a child needed to be reported to the police at once. Not to rely on the next stooge in the chain of command structure to do so.

    So maybe he died more suddenly due to the weight of guilt/shame. Now that would certainly be a just cause.

    It actually amazes me how some people are reacting to the criticism that Paterno and the school has been receiving. Even this morning I saw on the news students there boo hoo-ing over Paterno's death! Are you kidding?!? If that child had been related to them, and they found out that Paterno knew and didn't immediately go to the police? They would have pulled his plug!

    Like I said I am only basing my opinion on reading that he knew sexual abuse of a child occured, and he did not report it to police. To me that is a cowardly and shameful act. One of which he had an obligation to do. (Just the same as that McQuery coward did as well.)

    Tristan



    Wow! You really are a judgmental cold-hearted person. To judge Joe Paterno on the Penn State scandal after he spent a lifetime doing good, not just as a football coach, but as a humanitarian, is grossly short-sighted and unfair. It's easy to 2nd guess Joe Paterno's reaction to receiving such shocking news, but we really don't know all the facts. I truly believe that Joe Paterno thought he was doing the right thing, and that based on the information he received he felt going to his higher ups was the proper protocol. Remember, this was an 85 year old man -- the way they process something that was basically an allegation of shocking proportions is probably different than someone younger and perhaps more in tune with the whole topic of child molestation. The whole suggestion of this happening was likely something that Joe Paterno had a hard time even fathoming, let alone understand. I just think you have to judge someone on their whole life, not a sad chapter that happened near the end of their life of which he had no direct control over.
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    Jan 22, 2012 5:08 PM GMT
    musclefetish1 saidAnytime someone dies I reflect for a minute and decide FOR MYSELF whether they were worth any reflection at all. For this guy? None......
    I say this because, (unless I have my facts wrong), a sexual crime against a child was reported to him by one coward, not to the police, and then Senior Coward Paterno as well did not report it to the police. icon_eek.gif

    Yes...we all know about their (the school's), rules of reporting things. And I am all for corporate structure etc.....I truly am. I will always put my company's needs first above individual employee's needs. Mine included. But this abuse of a child needed to be reported to the police at once. Not to rely on the next stooge in the chain of command structure to do so.

    So maybe he died more suddenly due to the weight of guilt/shame. Now that would certainly be a just cause.

    It actually amazes me how some people are reacting to the criticism that Paterno and the school has been receiving. Even this morning I saw on the news students there boo hoo-ing over Paterno's death! Are you kidding?!? If that child had been related to them, and they found out that Paterno knew and didn't immediately go to the police? They would have pulled his plug!

    Like I said I am only basing my opinion on reading that he knew sexual abuse of a child occured, and he did not report it to police. To me that is a cowardly and shameful act. One of which he had an obligation to do. (Just the same as that McQuery coward did as well.)

    Tristan


    I think you should read his interview that came out last week. It may give you a slightly different perspective on what he did and why he did it. After I read it, I immediately thought "diffusion of responsibility"- one of the terms I learned in my psyc classes back in the day. This phenomenon happens all the time and sparked the "What Would You Do?" show. You see or hear about something that seems so shockingly wrong that you assume it has or will be taken care of. In this case, he thought that there was a specific procedure he had to follow, which he did follow.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/colleges/joe-paternos-first-interview-since-the-penn-state-sandusky-scandal/2012/01/13/gIQA08e4yP_story.html
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    Jan 22, 2012 5:17 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    musclefetish1 saidAnytime someone dies I reflect for a minute and decide FOR MYSELF whether they were worth any reflection at all. For this guy? None......
    I say this because, (unless I have my facts wrong), a sexual crime against a child was reported to him by one coward, not to the police, and then Senior Coward Paterno as well did not report it to the police. icon_eek.gif

    Yes...we all know about their (the school's), rules of reporting things. And I am all for corporate structure etc.....I truly am. I will always put my company's needs first above individual employee's needs. Mine included. But this abuse of a child needed to be reported to the police at once. Not to rely on the next stooge in the chain of command structure to do so.

    So maybe he died more suddenly due to the weight of guilt/shame. Now that would certainly be a just cause.

    It actually amazes me how some people are reacting to the criticism that Paterno and the school has been receiving. Even this morning I saw on the news students there boo hoo-ing over Paterno's death! Are you kidding?!? If that child had been related to them, and they found out that Paterno knew and didn't immediately go to the police? They would have pulled his plug!

    Like I said I am only basing my opinion on reading that he knew sexual abuse of a child occured, and he did not report it to police. To me that is a cowardly and shameful act. One of which he had an obligation to do. (Just the same as that McQuery coward did as well.)

    Tristan



    Wow! You really are a judgmental cold-hearted person. To judge Joe Paterno on the Penn State scandal after he spent a lifetime doing good, not just as a football coach, but as a humanitarian, is grossly short-sighted and unfair. It's easy to 2nd guess Joe Paterno's reaction to receiving such shocking news, but we really don't know all the facts. I truly believe that Joe Paterno thought he was doing the right thing, and that based on the information he received he felt going to his higher ups was the proper protocol. Remember, this was an 85 year old man -- the way they process something that was basically an allegation of shocking proportions is probably different than someone younger and perhaps more in tune with the whole topic of child molestation. The whole suggestion of this happening was likely something that Joe Paterno had a hard time even fathoming, let alone understand. I just think you have to judge someone on their whole life, not a sad chapter that happened near the end of their life of which he had no direct control over.


    No, I don't believe it cold hearted at all. The man acted cowardly by not reporting it to the police. I can not give this man a pass because of his age. If he was able/competent enough to be in charge, of and manage a multi-multi-million dollar dept of that school, then he was more than able to decide right from wrong.
    Just because a man has done incredible things for others the majority of their life, doesn't give him a pass on bad judement/cowardly acts when physical harm has come to another.

    So Todd, if you had witnessed a crime against a child at work, you would simply report it to your boss and be done with it? I may not agree with you EVER politically, but you are very strong in your convictions and I know that you would not rely on the next person doing the right thing because you were a coward. It's not your nature.

    I personally believe that the original coward McQuery should be prosecuted for not only not stopping the crime, but certainly for not reporting the crime to the police.

    Tristan
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Jan 22, 2012 5:17 PM GMT
    Brownale saidI immediately thought "diffusion of responsibility"- one of the terms I learned in my psyc classes back in the day. This phenomenon happens all the time and sparked the "What Would You Do?" show. You see or hear about something that seems so shockingly wrong that you assume it has or will be taken care of. In this case, he thought that there was a specific procedure he had to follow, which he did follow.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/colleges/joe-paternos-first-interview-since-the-penn-state-sandusky-scandal/2012/01/13/gIQA08e4yP_story.html




    And this makes complete sense to me. Even Mike McQuery said he was uncomfortable (even embarrassed) to go to coach Paterno because he didn't want to offend him with the terms and language he would have had to use to convey what he saw. This is not so hard to understand. The whole concept of Jerry Sedusky raping a child in the showers is just so hard to fathom that it must have just seemed incomprehensible and sort of left them in a state of shock not sure what to do next. At least they told someone, and tried to do what they thought was right. It's just such an uncomfortable shocking subject, that you can understand how it could leave someone sort of almost frozen.
  • jock_1

    Posts: 1491

    Jan 22, 2012 5:19 PM GMT
    after the scandle and losing his job, he lost his will to live. i told my friends he would'nt make the summer and sadly i was right...RIP jopa
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Jan 22, 2012 5:24 PM GMT
    musclefetish1 said
    Just because a man has done incredible things for others the majority of their life, doesn't give him a pass on bad judement/cowardly acts when physical harm has come to another.

    I personally believe that the original coward McQuery should be prosecuted for not only not stopping the crime, but certainly for not reporting the crime to the police.

    Tristan



    I think it's easy to pass judgment based solely on what was reported in the press, but the fact remains is that we do not know all the facts -- yet anyway. Regardless, it's not like McQuery or Paterno tried to cover the whole thing up -- they DID take the proper course of action that they thought was appropriate by going to their superiors. From what I read from the Paterno interviews, he felt this was something serious enough that it was bigger than something he should personally handle and that, in fact, the people above him should decide the course of action and be the ones to take this to the authorities. As shocking as this news was, let's not forget that it was something that had huge repercussions and had to be handled delicately -- especially before everyone really knew all the facts. What if what McQuery thought he saw was not exactly what it seemed? I'm not saying that is the case, but to just go off running to the police with information that has even the remotest possibility of being untrue or perhaps exaggerated may have been what was going through Paterno's mind.
  • hartfan

    Posts: 1037

    Jan 22, 2012 5:32 PM GMT
    RIP JoePa.
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    Jan 22, 2012 5:32 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    Brownale saidI immediately thought "diffusion of responsibility"- one of the terms I learned in my psyc classes back in the day. This phenomenon happens all the time and sparked the "What Would You Do?" show. You see or hear about something that seems so shockingly wrong that you assume it has or will be taken care of. In this case, he thought that there was a specific procedure he had to follow, which he did follow.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/colleges/joe-paternos-first-interview-since-the-penn-state-sandusky-scandal/2012/01/13/gIQA08e4yP_story.html




    And this makes complete sense to me. Even Mike McQuery said he was uncomfortable (even embarrassed) to go to coach Paterno because he didn't want to offend him with the terms and language he would have had to use to convey what he saw. This is not so hard to understand. The whole concept of Jerry Sedusky raping a child in the showers is just so hard to fathom that it must have just seemed incomprehensible and sort of left them in a state of shock not sure what to do next. At least they told someone, and tried to do what they thought was right. It's just such an uncomfortable shocking subject, that you can understand how it could leave someone sort of almost frozen.


    OK...even if I buy into this "being in such shock" thing that they were frozen emotionally icon_rolleyes.gif Then a day or 2 after the fact, and Sandusky was still not reported to the police, should have been the wake-up slap in the face.
    Yet he still did nothing.

    I'm sorry guys...he may have been old, but he was a competent enough to run that HUGE program at that school. There is simply no excuse. It is sad that a seemingly exemplary life was tainted by a cowardly self act.

    I feel, and it's easy to say, that I would have reacted properly. I say this because I act on my emotions first many times without thinking. I have gotten my ass kicked a couple of times in my life for jumping into a fight when I see an injustice. It's just my nature.

    Tristan
    PS
    (This reminds me a bit of Michael Vick. Because he is a great athlete, and he went to jail, that he is somehow still not the dispicable animal abuser he is?)
  • CuriousJockAZ

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    Jan 22, 2012 5:40 PM GMT
    musclefetish1 said
    I feel, and it's easy to say, that I would have reacted properly. I say this because I act on my emotions first many times without thinking. I have gotten my ass kicked a couple of times in my life for jumping into a fight when I see an injustice. It's just my nature.


    I have no doubt that you would have acted differently. I probably would have as well. That said, Joe Paterno comes from a different time, a whole different mindset, and I don't think it's such a leap to understand how he may have processed this sort of shocking revelation in almost a mixed state of disbelief, shock, and confusion, not really sure what the next course of action to take should be. He went to his next up in command. At least he did that much. Had he completely ignored the information, or worse, tried to cover it up, then I could understand your judge, jury, and executioner mentality, but that simply was not the case. He did what he perceived to be the proper course of action -- he went to his bosses.
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    Jan 22, 2012 5:55 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    musclefetish1 said
    I feel, and it's easy to say, that I would have reacted properly. I say this because I act on my emotions first many times without thinking. I have gotten my ass kicked a couple of times in my life for jumping into a fight when I see an injustice. It's just my nature.


    I have no doubt that you would have acted differently. I probably would have as well. That said, Joe Paterno comes from a different time, a whole different mindset, and I don't think it's such a leap to understand how he may have processed this sort of shocking revelation in almost a mixed state of disbelief, shock, and confusion, not really sure what the next course of action to take should be. He went to his next up in command. At least he did that much. Had he completely ignored the information, or worse, tried to cover it up, then I could understand your judge, jury, and executioner mentality, but that simply was not the case. He did what he perceived to be the proper course of action -- he went to his bosses.


    I don't give people passes because they are geezers. I've read about this guy. He had worked with "kids" most of his life. Freshmen football players, albeit older then the victim, are still kids. He has been around working with kids since sexual abuse of kids started being reported openly on the news in the late 80's early 90's.

    We all know right from wrong plain and simple. We are not talking about theft of school property or funds, or anything as simple as that. Now these crimes, yes by all means follow the chain of command.
    We are talking about having direct knowledge of a crime of physical abuse committed against another person. A defenseless child no less.
    Even though Paterno's knowledge was indirect, crimes of physical abuse whether fact based or theory based need to be reported immediately to the police to determine if in fact it did happen.

    Tristan
  • melloyello

    Posts: 149

    Jan 22, 2012 7:12 PM GMT
    I read interviews with this guy: he really didn't think he did anything wrong. He thought his football career "eclipsed" everything that happened and he was really truly baffled about what happened. Thats kind of scary. But more scary was the rioting on campus when he was dismissed. People truly have priorities in the wrong order.