Floss or die! is what she told me.

  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    Jun 24, 2008 8:31 PM GMT
    Well it wasn't that harsh, but I just got back from the dentist and the hygenist told me that the older we get, the less our immune systems pay attention to our mouths, therefore it's easier to get Opportunistic Infections as well as gum disease. The best way to fight it is to floss more when when we get into our late 30s and early 40s.

    I had only a few places where the gums bled when she worked on my teeth, but to have her say the magic words Opportunistic Infections (buzzwords, especially, for anyone with HIV) did the trick.

    I still have to look up what she said about the Surgeon General's findings that gum disease has been linked to (not a cause of) pancratic disorders, diabetes and other such things.

    She did make me feel better and told me that I had really pretty teeth, and that flossing helps to do more than just keep them, it will also help keep me healthier as I get older.
  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    Jun 24, 2008 8:55 PM GMT
    Ack! she was right...

    "We hope this Surgeon General's Report will heighten the public and medical community's perception of the importance of oral health, just as past reports on tobacco use and more recently mental health have," said Jack Caton, D.D.S., M.S., president of the AAP. "As research continues to strengthen the links between periodontal disease and heart disease, diabetes, respiratory disease and preterm births, it's important to spread the message that periodontal disease is far from being just an oral health problem. It represents a significant health risk to millions of people."

    http://www.perio.org/consumer/surgeon.gen.rpt.htm

    Most of the data seems circumstantial, but studies continue and more info arises that supports the hypothesis. So to those over 35, floss like your life depends on it. (insert spooky music) It just might. icon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 24, 2008 10:53 PM GMT
    FOR real. I just spent 6k out of pocket getting my mouth back into pristine condition. Its a slippery slope, but it is easy to start not taking as good of care for your mouth as you should. I had a full scaling cleaning and have felt amazing since. I am still bad about flossing, but after the few cavities and a root canal, I see the importance of it.

    I recommend a sonic care tooth brush. I have been using it and have had no plaque since.

    Keep your mouth in shape like the rest of ya. There are fun times and good food to be enjoyed - neither of which are fun with nasty gums and a jacked grill.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 24, 2008 11:01 PM GMT
    I don't believe the data


    People who practice extensive dental hygiene often eat healthily and exercise...

    Hence the connection between heart disease and flossingicon_confused.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 24, 2008 11:02 PM GMT
    funny-dog-pictures-dog-needs-dentures.jp
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Jun 24, 2008 11:43 PM GMT
    DJBens77 saidFOR real. I just spent 6k out of pocket getting my mouth back into pristine condition.




    And he has a cute smile to prove it icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 25, 2008 12:11 AM GMT
    I floss twice a day, and the last time I went to the dentist, there was no bleeding at all. But then I still have all my teeth, and only one filling..

    Not bad for an old fag of 46.