Feeling sick after sprinting . . .

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    Jan 23, 2012 7:12 AM GMT
    I've just started to try out 400-meter barefoot sprints for 1-2 minutes at a time, and only managed to squeeze in 300 meters or so for the first two tries, and then the full shebang on the third and final time around. I suddenly felt a huge wave of nausea, and had to sit on the benches and give up my fourth try.

    Could it be due to me not having done any sprints in the past year or so? I do regular long-distance running, so I did my whole repertoire of motion stretches before starting to sprint (as opposed to stretches done while I am perfectly still). Also, I experienced severe stitches in my lower hip and pelvic region (the asscheeks basically, for a lack of a better term) right before my third run, so I may suspect a poor running form to be the cause of my nausea . . . any clues as to what is going on here? Advice is most welcome as well
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    Jan 23, 2012 7:25 AM GMT
    If sprints are something new you've just started, I'd say that it's a "normal" reaction. Your body isn't accustomed to the stress and your lungs can't suck in oxygen fast enough. Maybe dial things back a little and work your way up. If the symptoms are persistent, then maybe go see a doctor to make sure everything is all right.
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    Jan 23, 2012 5:22 PM GMT
    Has nothing to do with form. As xrichx stated, it's about your bodys reaction to this new exertion you are putting it through.
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    Jan 23, 2012 8:13 PM GMT
    Yeah, kin'da thought: if I'm not puking, then I'm not trying hard enough; same with the snot running out my nose.
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    Jan 23, 2012 8:26 PM GMT
    How long after eating do you do this? It could be that you are not allowing sufficient time (i.e. about 3 hours) for your food to digest.
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    Jan 23, 2012 8:35 PM GMT
    1-2 min sprints would be stressing your body's ability to buffer lactic acid. It has nothing to do with his ability to get oxygen to the muscles whoever said that above. Right now your system isn't able to do the work level you are putting on it, so you feel sick. It should go away as you get trained.

    Ways to get better at buffering lactic acid: have more red blood cells (so aerobically train at a lower intensity for a longer duration--this will stress the oxidative system and create more red blood cells to carry oxygen and increase total blood volume). Blood is the strongest buffer in the system (specifically hemoglobin is). There are other ergogenic aids you could take to increase your buffering capacity, but they aren't tolerated well by the stomach/intestines. These include eating a lot of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) and taking certain supplements I'd look up from my notes if anyone really cared to take them.

    Then, periodize practice your sprinting and aerobic days such that you do not abuse your knees and body. This is really dependent on your body weight. If you are heavier your body takes more of a beating from running and sprinting than if you are light.
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    Jan 24, 2012 6:55 AM GMT
    Mil8 saidHow long after eating do you do this? It could be that you are not allowing sufficient time (i.e. about 3 hours) for your food to digest.


    Three hours? Jesus, I'd starve by then (extremely fast metabolism), but I guess you have a point there - I took a quick glug of 150 ml of a choc-flavoured protein drink (but on a half-full stomach) 5 minutes before my second run, as I had no access to water at that time. Maybe I should replace that with normal water or some electrolyte-based drink?
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    Jan 24, 2012 7:00 AM GMT
    bluey2223 said Ways to get better at buffering lactic acid: have more red blood cells (so aerobically train at a lower intensity for a longer duration--this will stress the oxidative system and create more red blood cells to carry oxygen and increase total blood volume). Blood is the strongest buffer in the system (specifically hemoglobin is). There are other ergogenic aids you could take to increase your buffering capacity, but they aren't tolerated well by the stomach/intestines. These include eating a lot of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) and taking certain supplements I'd look up from my notes if anyone really cared to take them.


    Really interesting stuff to read here. I never knew increasing buffer capacity actually meant a great deal to aerobic exercise - then again, I never knew what the real difference between aerobic and anaerobic workout is until a few years ago either. I guess my compact body size (5 feet 5 inches/128 lbs) makes it harder for my body to maximise oxygen intake to its fullest until i start to feel fatigued from a few laps around the footy field. I'd also like to try out that baking soda method - hey, if I can eat fermented duck's egg or jam-and-sausages (weird tastebuds, I know), I sure as hell can make minor changes to my diet and increase my tolerance to lactic acid build-up - I'll keep you posted on my updates after my run again tomorrow
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    Jan 24, 2012 7:01 AM GMT
    Trollileo saidYeah, just give it a few days or a week or so. Your body will definitely accommodate the new stress you're putting on it.


    YOU AGAIN! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jan 24, 2012 7:02 AM GMT
    Did you get light headed, suddenly sweating hard/overheating, everything looked bright as well?
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    Jan 24, 2012 7:08 AM GMT
    SkinnyBitch saidDid you get light headed, suddenly sweating hard/overheating, everything looked bright as well?


    No, just the feeling that I wanted to throw up. I managed to give out a few burps to relieve my stomach upset, but by then, I had a strain at the base of my skull at the back and felt like I was a bit dehydrated (wasn't even hot or sunny, an abnormally cloudy day for Sydney in the summertime). Sounds like you've experienced something like this before?
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    Jan 24, 2012 7:29 AM GMT
    ArtsyRunner said
    SkinnyBitch saidDid you get light headed, suddenly sweating hard/overheating, everything looked bright as well?


    No, just the feeling that I wanted to throw up. I managed to give out a few burps to relieve my stomach upset, but by then, I had a strain at the base of my skull at the back and felt like I was a bit dehydrated (wasn't even hot or sunny, an abnormally cloudy day for Sydney in the summertime). Sounds like you've experienced something like this before?


    Something different for me, nvm.
  • monstapex

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    Jan 24, 2012 7:44 AM GMT
    ArtsyRunner saidI've just started to try out 400-meter barefoot sprints for 1-2 minutes at a time, and only managed to squeeze in 300 meters or so for the first two tries, and then the full shebang on the third and final time around. I suddenly felt a huge wave of nausea, and had to sit on the benches and give up my fourth try.

    Could it be due to me not having done any sprints in the past year or so? I do regular long-distance running, so I did my whole repertoire of motion stretches before starting to sprint (as opposed to stretches done while I am perfectly still). Also, I experienced severe stitches in my lower hip and pelvic region (the asscheeks basically, for a lack of a better term) right before my third run, so I may suspect a poor running form to be the cause of my nausea . . . any clues as to what is going on here? Advice is most welcome as well



    Always consult your physician before starting any diet or exercise regimen
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    Jan 29, 2012 2:10 AM GMT
    ArtsyRunner said
    bluey2223 said Ways to get better at buffering lactic acid: have more red blood cells (so aerobically train at a lower intensity for a longer duration--this will stress the oxidative system and create more red blood cells to carry oxygen and increase total blood volume). Blood is the strongest buffer in the system (specifically hemoglobin is). There are other ergogenic aids you could take to increase your buffering capacity, but they aren't tolerated well by the stomach/intestines. These include eating a lot of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) and taking certain supplements I'd look up from my notes if anyone really cared to take them.


    Really interesting stuff to read here. I never knew increasing buffer capacity actually meant a great deal to aerobic exercise - then again, I never knew what the real difference between aerobic and anaerobic workout is until a few years ago either. I guess my compact body size (5 feet 5 inches/128 lbs) makes it harder for my body to maximise oxygen intake to its fullest until i start to feel fatigued from a few laps around the footy field. I'd also like to try out that baking soda method - hey, if I can eat fermented duck's egg or jam-and-sausages (weird tastebuds, I know), I sure as hell can make minor changes to my diet and increase my tolerance to lactic acid build-up - I'll keep you posted on my updates after my run again tomorrow


    Technically if you are producing lactic acid, the workout isn't what an exercise physiologist (me) would consider an aerobic workout. It is too intense of a work rate at that point. However, in practical terms and for the general population, if you are working at lactic threshold (and getting the burn) you are also stressing your aerobic system long enough to be making positive physiological changes expected from an aerobic workout.

    If you are shorter and light weight (you are short and light weight at 5'5" and 128 lbs), it has nothing to do with your ability to efficiently metabolize oxygen. IF ANYTHING, you'd have a better ability to efficiently use oxygen than someone who was taller and the same body proportions Again, this is because you have less weight on your frame, meaning less weight/force for your muscles to push with each step. Lesser strenuous contractions = more of them before fatigue = more aerobic on the spectrum for energy contribution.

    Also, I don't even know many division 1 athletes who use baking soda. I wouldn't bother. There is a high sodium intake with the use of baking soda that isn't worth it. Just focus on efficient training rather than the use of non-food products.