Report: Average Silicon Valley tech salary tops $100,000 a year

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    Jan 23, 2012 11:35 PM GMT
    http://www.techflash.com/seattle/2012/01/silicon-valley-tech-salary-100000.html

    The average annual salary for tech workers in Silicon Valley surpassed $100,000 for the first time in 2011, according to a report Monday by online jobs site Dice Holdings Inc.

    Dice Senior Vice President Tom Silver told the Wall Street Journal that the average is up 5.2 percent from 2010's average and much higher than the 2 percent pay raise that tech workers elsewhere in the U.S. got last year, which averaged $81,327.

    Dice began its annual survey of tech salaries in 2001.

    In addition to the data on annual pay, Dice said bonuses for Silicon Valley tech workers rose by 13 percent last year to $12,450. The average bonus increase nationwide was 8 percent to $8,769.

    It also reported that hourly contractor rates in Silicon Valley rose 11 percent to $74 an hour, while it rose by only 2 percent to $63 an hour across the country.

    A recently Fortune survey put the average pay for Microsot software engineers at $118,000, with a $13,800 bonues.

    A survey last summer put mid-career median pay at Amazon at $110,000 a year, and $127,000 at Microsoft.
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    Jan 24, 2012 1:24 AM GMT
    I'm sure there are consultants busily working to figure out how to offshore those jobs. icon_cool.gif
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    Jan 24, 2012 3:12 AM GMT
    Christian73 saidI'm sure there are consultants busily working to figure out how to offshore those jobs. icon_cool.gif


    Says the guy who hasn't even heard of ars technica? That pretty much disqualifies you from being able to talk intelligibly about tech.

    As for outsourcing in general - it's not happening like many think - and it's a lot more difficult to coordinate especially to countries like India and China but the higher level jobs still remain in places like the US and Canada because of productivity.

    Also that incomes are continuing to rise suggests any outsourcing that is happening is because there just aren't enough software engineers at the caliber required rather than the opposite. Supply and demand is not that difficult a concept for even you to grasp Christian.
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    Jan 24, 2012 3:28 AM GMT
    riddler78 said
    Christian73 saidI'm sure there are consultants busily working to figure out how to offshore those jobs. icon_cool.gif


    Says the guy who hasn't even heard of ars technica? That pretty much disqualifies you from being able to talk intelligibly about tech.

    As for outsourcing in general - it's not happening like many think - and it's a lot more difficult to coordinate especially to countries like India and China but the higher level jobs still remain in places like the US and Canada because of productivity.

    Also that incomes are continuing to rise suggests any outsourcing that is happening is because there just aren't enough software engineers at the caliber required rather than the opposite. Supply and demand is not that difficult a concept for even you to grasp Christian.


    No. I never heard of your little-known tech geek blog. I guarantee you that most people haven't either.

    And, you can justify it however you'd like but we both know that as soon as these jobs can be outsourced, they will be.

    We both further know you that you have no moral or ethical qualms with businesses draining every penny of profit they can out of workers and then giving it to shareholders. You've said as much repeatedly.

    Just stop pretending it's not an amoral and sociopathic view of the world.
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    Jan 24, 2012 4:29 AM GMT
    AMoonHawk said
    riddler78 said
    Christian73 saidI'm sure there are consultants busily working to figure out how to offshore those jobs. icon_cool.gif


    ....
    Also that incomes are continuing to rise suggests any outsourcing that is happening is because there just aren't enough software engineers at the caliber required rather than the opposite ... .

    You could not be further from the truth. I work with the technical people in other countries everyday, and they are dumber than shit. They quite obviously lie to get their jobs, because they have almost zero technical knowledge. And the more time goes by the worse they get. Yes in the beginning there were some very high technically skilled people, but trust me, they are pretty much gone. US companies are banking a inferior quantity at a very cheap price and no quality. It's cheap and there are millions scrambling for the jobs so basically they have an inexhaustible supply, so who can blame. Executives are lining their pockets with millions, so why should they care about providing US jobs, there is no intensive to do it.


    This only reinforces my point about domestic productivity.
  • studflyboy87

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    Jan 24, 2012 4:55 AM GMT
    Christian73 saidI'm sure there are consultants busily working to figure out how to offshore those jobs. icon_cool.gif


    Most of the jobs getting sent overseas are the non-skilled jobs (like manufacturing work). The outcome of this type is labor is generally binary. The item is either produced or it is not. It doesn't matter whether the work is done by someone in the US, or some random person overseas with no skills, experience, and makes 1/10th the salary.

    This is not the case with skilled jobs. Most skilled technical and engineering jobs have stayed here in the US. These are the jobs where the production of a worker is strongly influenced by the quality of the worker. The reason that salaries for tech workers are increasing is because large companies are competing for the best and brightest workers. Could these jobs be sent overseas? Sure they can, but you can't just give them to anyone. They need to be given to someone with the right education and experience. You are much more likely to find that person here in the US.

    The US unemployment rate in December was 8.5%. The unemployment rate for people without a high school diploma was 13.8%, while it was 8.7% for people with just a high school diploma, and it was only 4.1% for people with at least a college degree. Outsourcing of jobs is an issue for non-skilled labor. It is not nearly that big of an issue for skilled labor.
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    Jan 24, 2012 5:03 AM GMT
    studflyboy87 said
    Christian73 saidI'm sure there are consultants busily working to figure out how to offshore those jobs. icon_cool.gif


    Most of the jobs getting sent overseas are the non-skilled jobs (like manufacturing work). The outcome of this type is labor is generally binary. The item is either produced or it is not. It doesn't matter whether the work is done by someone in the US, or some random person overseas with no skills, experience, and makes 1/10th the salary.

    This is not the case with skilled jobs. Most skilled technical and engineering jobs have stayed here in the US. These are the jobs where the production of a worker is strongly influenced by the quality of the worker. The reason that salaries for tech workers are increasing is because large companies are competing for the best and brightest workers. Could these jobs be sent overseas? Sure they can, but you can't just give them to anyone. They need to be given to someone with the right education and experience. You are much more likely to find that person here in the US.

    The US unemployment rate in December was 8.5%. The unemployment rate for people without a high school diploma was 13.8%, while it was 8.7% for people with just a high school diploma, and it was only 4.1% for people with at least a college degree. Outsourcing of jobs is an issue for non-skilled labor. It is not nearly that big of an issue for skilled labor.


    In general, I agree with you but as public education is eviscerated and fewer Americans can afford advanced education, there will be more non-skilled workers who need jobs.

    Beyond that, as technology makes it easier and easier to work remotely or coordinate internationally, companies will find ways to outsource those jobs. If they don't, Wall Street will punish them. (And riddler will cheer them on.)
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    Jan 24, 2012 5:09 AM GMT
    Christian73 said
    studflyboy87 said
    Christian73 saidI'm sure there are consultants busily working to figure out how to offshore those jobs. icon_cool.gif


    Most of the jobs getting sent overseas are the non-skilled jobs (like manufacturing work). The outcome of this type is labor is generally binary. The item is either produced or it is not. It doesn't matter whether the work is done by someone in the US, or some random person overseas with no skills, experience, and makes 1/10th the salary.

    This is not the case with skilled jobs. Most skilled technical and engineering jobs have stayed here in the US. These are the jobs where the production of a worker is strongly influenced by the quality of the worker. The reason that salaries for tech workers are increasing is because large companies are competing for the best and brightest workers. Could these jobs be sent overseas? Sure they can, but you can't just give them to anyone. They need to be given to someone with the right education and experience. You are much more likely to find that person here in the US.

    The US unemployment rate in December was 8.5%. The unemployment rate for people without a high school diploma was 13.8%, while it was 8.7% for people with just a high school diploma, and it was only 4.1% for people with at least a college degree. Outsourcing of jobs is an issue for non-skilled labor. It is not nearly that big of an issue for skilled labor.


    In general, I agree with you but as public education is eviscerated and fewer Americans can afford advanced education, there will be more non-skilled workers who need jobs.

    Beyond that, as technology makes it easier and easier to work remotely or coordinate internationally, companies will find ways to outsource those jobs. If they don't, Wall Street will punish them. (And riddler will cheer them on.)


    Again, do you enjoy wallowing in the ignorance? Have you somehow missed the last few weeks including the endorsement by the White House of services like codemonkey? Do you really think the only way to get an education is through a (public) university in person?

    And yep, you would rather companies stay inefficient, stagnate and ultimately go bankrupt out of inertia rather than try to maximize their resources.
  • studflyboy87

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    Jan 24, 2012 5:12 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 saidReport: Average Silicon Valley tech salary tops $100,000 a year

    This sounds like a job for the "Reasonable Profits Board!"



    We should pass The Equalization of Opportunities Act to fix this injustice icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jan 24, 2012 5:23 AM GMT
    AMoonHawk said
    studflyboy87 said
    Christian73 saidI'm sure there are consultants busily working to figure out how to offshore those jobs. icon_cool.gif


    Most of the jobs getting sent overseas are the non-skilled jobs (like manufacturing work). The outcome of this type is labor is generally binary. The item is either produced or it is not. It doesn't matter whether the work is done by someone in the US, or some random person overseas with no skills, experience, and makes 1/10th the salary.

    This is not the case with skilled jobs. Most skilled technical and engineering jobs have stayed here in the US. These are the jobs where the production of a worker is strongly influenced by the quality of the worker. The reason that salaries for tech workers are increasing is because large companies are competing for the best and brightest workers. Could these jobs be sent overseas? Sure they can, but you can't just give them to anyone. They need to be given to someone with the right education and experience. You are much more likely to find that person here in the US.

    The US unemployment rate in December was 8.5%. The unemployment rate for people without a high school diploma was 13.8%, while it was 8.7% for people with just a high school diploma, and it was only 4.1% for people with at least a college degree. Outsourcing of jobs is an issue for non-skilled labor. It is not nearly that big of an issue for skilled labor.


    Where are you getting your data from? More than half of all technical jobs have been moved to India and other countries. I'm going to assume you do not fully realize what has happened in this country because you are only 24 so you were about 16 when we started loosing all our technical jobs to overseas so you likely were not working in the technical industry during that time to observe what was going on. The company I work for has buildings of technical people all over the US. In my building alone over a 8 or 10 year time period we went from about 2000 employees to about 100. I think it was a purposeful slow trickle so that the American people would not notice. And there is still that slow trickle of jobs leaving this country. Not only did we loose technical jobs, all those telephone assistance jobs with your credit cards, bank accounts and just about everything else you would call in to talk to someone for assistance got move overseas too. Only recently has a trickle begun to come back because millions of American began canceling their accounts in retaliation.


    Hmmm - you use anecdotes and claim he must be wrong because he's considerably younger than you are? Really? As for losing all our technical jobs to overseas - clearly you're not really as in touch with reality as you think. But go ahead and challenge the numbers - apparently you're too old to know how to google?
  • studflyboy87

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    Jan 24, 2012 5:35 AM GMT
    AMoonHawk saidall those telephone assistance jobs with your credit cards, bank accounts and just about everything else you would call in to talk to someone for assistance got move overseas too.


    Those are examples of non-skilled jobs. You don't need a college degree to answer the telephone. That job can be done by any person here in the US, or any person in another country who speaks english, and they will do it for at least 1/10th the cost.

    If we were sending away most of our skilled jobs, I would be scared. But we are not. We are sending away jobs that can be done by anyone for a significantly lower cost. When we outsource non-skilled labor, it makes our US based companies stronger, more competitive, and ultimately items that we purchase cheaper. I have no problem with outsourcing non-skilled labor when it makes sense to do so. Outsourcing is not always a bad thing. Here is my personal example of outsourcing of non-skilled labor being a good thing for the US and our economy:

    I own a Ford Fusion Hybrid. It was designed and engineered in the US by skilled engineers. It was marketed and sold by skilled businessmen here in the US. It was built in Mexico by non-skilled labor who basically assembled the car at 1/10th the cost of an American worker, making the car cheaper for me to buy. All the profit will go to an American company and all the skilled labor will be performed by American workers. Had the Ford Fusion Hybird not been built in Mexico for a cheaper price, I probably would bought the Nissan Altima Hybrid, which would have sent all my money out of the country. Outsourcing of non-skilled labor is not a terrible thing, and in many instances it can be a good thing for US companies and our economy overall.
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    Jan 24, 2012 5:38 AM GMT
    riddler78 said
    Christian73 said
    studflyboy87 said
    Christian73 saidI'm sure there are consultants busily working to figure out how to offshore those jobs. icon_cool.gif


    Most of the jobs getting sent overseas are the non-skilled jobs (like manufacturing work). The outcome of this type is labor is generally binary. The item is either produced or it is not. It doesn't matter whether the work is done by someone in the US, or some random person overseas with no skills, experience, and makes 1/10th the salary.

    This is not the case with skilled jobs. Most skilled technical and engineering jobs have stayed here in the US. These are the jobs where the production of a worker is strongly influenced by the quality of the worker. The reason that salaries for tech workers are increasing is because large companies are competing for the best and brightest workers. Could these jobs be sent overseas? Sure they can, but you can't just give them to anyone. They need to be given to someone with the right education and experience. You are much more likely to find that person here in the US.

    The US unemployment rate in December was 8.5%. The unemployment rate for people without a high school diploma was 13.8%, while it was 8.7% for people with just a high school diploma, and it was only 4.1% for people with at least a college degree. Outsourcing of jobs is an issue for non-skilled labor. It is not nearly that big of an issue for skilled labor.


    In general, I agree with you but as public education is eviscerated and fewer Americans can afford advanced education, there will be more non-skilled workers who need jobs.

    Beyond that, as technology makes it easier and easier to work remotely or coordinate internationally, companies will find ways to outsource those jobs. If they don't, Wall Street will punish them. (And riddler will cheer them on.)


    Again, do you enjoy wallowing in the ignorance? Have you somehow missed the last few weeks including the endorsement by the White House of services like codemonkey? Do you really think the only way to get an education is through a (public) university in person?

    And yep, you would rather companies stay inefficient, stagnate and ultimately go bankrupt out of inertia rather than try to maximize their resources.


    What are you rambling about? Missed what? Was it covered on ars techina?

    And I said "public education" as in primary through secondary school, dumbass. In terms of online education for regular or advanced education, there's no proof that those systems will work except that they're cheaper.

    Where were you educated again?

    And I'm all for efficiency, just not greed.
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    Jan 24, 2012 5:39 AM GMT
    AMoonHawk saidGood luck in your future careers ... I guess you deserve what you get.


    And it sounds like you deserve what you got.
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    Jan 24, 2012 5:41 AM GMT
    As a starting point - if there are those who are actually interested in the data behind unemployment, tech jobs and education overall....

    "Tech unemployment below 4 percent, jobs stay open for months"
    http://www.techflash.com/seattle/2011/06/tech-employment-below-4-percent.html

    "Education pays ... Education pays in higher earnings and lower unemployment rates"
    http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_chart_001.htm

    "Unemployment and Education"
    http://www.outsidethebeltway.com/unemployment-and-education-2/

    "Looking At Unemployment By Age, Education And Duration"
    http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2011/12/01/143016866/unemployment-falls-to-8-6-percent

    Yeah - the US must have really exported half its technical jobs... icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jan 24, 2012 5:42 AM GMT
    riddler78 saidAs a starting point - if there are those who are actually interested in the data behind unemployment, tech jobs and education overall....

    "Tech unemployment below 4 percent, jobs stay open for months"
    http://www.techflash.com/seattle/2011/06/tech-employment-below-4-percent.html

    "Education pays ... Education pays in higher earnings and lower unemployment rates"
    http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_chart_001.htm

    "Unemployment and Education"
    http://www.outsidethebeltway.com/unemployment-and-education-2/

    "Looking At Unemployment By Age, Education And Duration"
    http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2011/12/01/143016866/unemployment-falls-to-8-6-percent

    Yeah - the US must have really exported half its technical jobs... icon_rolleyes.gif


    My industry is similarly competitive with a low unemployment rate. What's your point?
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    Jan 24, 2012 6:34 AM GMT
    so, C73, you and your pals the apparatchiks will get to define what constitutes greed? . . .

    god help us . . .
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    Jan 24, 2012 7:13 AM GMT
    studlyboy87 said, "Those are examples of non-skilled jobs. You don't need a college degree to answer the telephone. That job can be done by any person here in the US, or any person in another country who speaks english, and they will do it for at least 1/10th the cost. "

    Do you think all call center jobs are just answering a telephone? What are the callers calling about? Those are the skill sets the call center employees have to have, and some call centers are handling your credit cards and ID. Some are handing your life and house insurance. Some are handling and trouble shooting your computer's antivirus software etc. You'd be happy with an non-skilled employee handling your bank account?
    Interesting stuff.

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    Jan 24, 2012 7:21 AM GMT
    meninlove said studlyboy87 said, "Those are examples of non-skilled jobs. You don't need a college degree to answer the telephone. That job can be done by any person here in the US, or any person in another country who speaks english, and they will do it for at least 1/10th the cost. "

    Do you think all call center jobs are just answering a telephone? What are the callers calling about? Those are the skill sets the call center employees have to have, and some call centers are handling your credit cards and ID. Some are handing your life and house insurance. Some are handling and trouble shooting your computer's antivirus software etc. You'd be happy with an non-skilled employee handling your bank account?
    Interesting stuff.



    And you think that low skilled workers in Canada or the US would safeguard this data better than those in the developing world? Either way it's going to be a nonskilled worker - and I would guess that those in a developing country might even be more inclined to safeguard the data.

    It's like people who protest walmart - which is a past time of the rich. Because consumers demand lower prices, companies seek to innovate and become more productive.

    You don't need a college degree to answer the phone. As for call centers, you do know that many require you to follow a script and tree of questions and specific answers of how to answer and based on what comes up on the computer screen? This is how they attempt to standardize the service quality.
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    Jan 24, 2012 7:29 AM GMT
    Why is this a bad thing?
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    Jan 24, 2012 7:32 AM GMT
    "And you think that low skilled workers in Canada or the US would safeguard this data better than those in the developing world? "


    Sorry buddy, but I worked in call centers for years and some of what we handled was extremely sensitive and the courses we took were onerous and required in order to get the job. Some of them payed 27.00 an hour because of the skill sets and security involved. When your ID and social insurance number are sent overseas there's a potential for abuse and it has happened already.

    Here's a small one for you.
    http://www.silicon.com/special-features/offshoring/2005/04/12/350000-citibank-theft-victims-gullible-and-careless-39129475/
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    Jan 24, 2012 7:49 AM GMT
    I really don't get it. The left says we should help everyone globally. So some corporations become global and then the left says hey that is not good we have Americans that need jobs. We can't send jobs oversees to companies cause we need them here. But what about our global partners? They need jobs in India. Global. Like the left said. No, we need them in the USA. But what about being a global community? That was the whole idea? No, the unions are pissed that jobs are going oversees. But the left said we are a global community. So now the American left that said we need to be a global community is pissed that jobs followed what they said. Lol?

    What is it? We need to be global? We are not just a small America but we need we need to think global? So now corporationss agree and get attacked for it?

    I will never understand the left except they never create jobs. They just bitch at the people that do.
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    Jan 24, 2012 3:32 PM GMT
    One only needs to live in CA to know that these salaries are not as high as one might think. If you've ever tried to live and commute in CA you would better understand that the starting salaries are not going to be comparable to those in the rest of the country. The Dept of Labor use to have a tier system of determining locality pay around the country with the SF Bay area in the first tier all by itself. I believe LA was with NY in the second tier but salaries must be competitive for employees to be able to live in the state.
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    Jan 24, 2012 5:21 PM GMT
    To echo EB's point: as absurd as it must sound to folks in most of the rest of the country, 100K in Silicon Valley is really just scraping by, especially if you have dependents, student loans, etc. The cost of living is just high in general, and for housing in particular.

    The upside? You get to live here, and I wouldn't trade it.
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    Jan 25, 2012 5:29 AM GMT
    As an addendum, again underscoring that there are certain segments of the job market that are outperforming - which carries its own set of implications that maybe what's happening is at least in part structural - that some jobs are going away that will never return (which underscores how stupid industrial policy and bailouts can be given how poorly governments bet).

    Average greater Seattle area tech salary now tops $90,000 a year

    http://www.techflash.com/seattle/2012/01/seattle-tech-workers-averaged-5-raise.html

    The average tech salary in the greater Seattle area is now $90,362 a year, up 5 percent from a year ago. One in three Seattle-based tech professionals said they had received a bonus. The average for 2011 was $9,892.

    On any given day, there are 2,500 openings for tech jobs posted in the greater Seattle area. And tech job postings have grown each month for the past two years.

    That's all according to a survey conducted for the tech career site Dice.

    The survey bolsters earlier reports about tech hiring. We already know that software engineers and other tech workers are in big demand, with companies like Facebook, Google, eBay and Zynga setting up shop here to tap into our talent pool.

    The big guys were followed by smaller companies such GreenButton, Rhiza Labs and The Climate Corporation that also have opened offices locally. Meanwhile, our home-grown tech companies, including F5 Networks, Amazon and others, also are hiring. A few days ago, Tableau Software said it planned to hire 300 this year.

    Nationally, tech professionals on average saw salary increases of more than 2 percent in 2011, boosting their average annual wage to $81,327 from $79,384 in 2010, according to the survey. Workers who got raises were tech vets with 11 or more years of experience. Bonuses were up 8 percent, to $8,769. It was the largest salary growth since 2008.

    I blogged about the Dice survey Monday, with a focus on Silicon Valley, where average tech salaries top $100,000.

    “Finally! Compensation has mustered some momentum, as more and more top tech markets are notching increases in pay. Silicon Valley’s compensation moved first and wrote the playbook for highly qualified tech professionals to ask for more -- whether that be in Seattle, Houston or Raleigh,” said Tom Silver, SVP, North America at Dice. “The increasing popularity of bonuses shows companies are rewarding their top performers. While everyone loves a bonus, anyone who has been through a cycle knows that bonuses both reward and punish. In fast-changing markets, it’s imperative for highly skilled tech professionals to capitalize on their career and compensation options.”
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    Jan 25, 2012 5:41 AM GMT
    JackNWNJ saidIt's unfair.

    Anyway, did you see Obama's speech tonight? Here was the white Liberal reaction to his soaring rhetoric:



    Can you be any more immature?