Stuttering

  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Jan 27, 2012 2:04 PM GMT
    I'm a little surprised that stuttering is a fairly common problem and this includes famous ones like Richard Branson. I also notice that it's a little more common with British than Americans. Also Brits tend to use 'ums' quite a bit; stiff upper lip?

    Any similar observations?
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    Jan 27, 2012 3:16 PM GMT
    I've stuttered my whole life. sucked big time in grammar school icon_sad.gif it got a lot better but I still get it sometimes when I get stressed or nervous or emotional
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    Jan 27, 2012 4:59 PM GMT
    When I worked construction, a guy I sometimes worked with stuttered. But also he often sang during the day to whatever was on the radio and when singing, he did not stutter. He had engaged in some sort of speech therapy at some point in his life and so while his stuttering in conversation was noticeable it was not excessive.
  • a303guy

    Posts: 829

    Jan 27, 2012 5:56 PM GMT
    I was a big time stutter-er growing up, a condition that drove my mother, who was a speech therapist, absolutely nuts, which tended to make things worse for me.

    As I got older I discovered some work-arounds, mostly discovering that i needed to become more methodical about speaking and not letting my mouth get behind, rather than ahead, of where my brain was in a given conversation. Interestingly, now I'm a public-speaker/facilitator, and stuttering is rarely a problem for me.
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    Jan 27, 2012 6:16 PM GMT
    People who have done excessive drugs usually develop studdering problems, one observation I have noticed.
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    Jan 27, 2012 6:31 PM GMT
    My mom will stutter from time to time, dwelling on some beginning sounds of a word on occasion (w-w-w-w-w-when, s-s-s-s-s-s-Saturday). She's had it her entire life, and it's heartbreaking because it's clearly damaged her confidence being around other people and made her very self-aware. icon_sad.gif

    Interestingly, neither my brother nor I developed any stuttering problems.
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    Jan 27, 2012 11:18 PM GMT
    Defenseon saidPeople who have done excessive drugs usually develop studdering problems, one observation I have noticed.

    My excessive drug use has cured my stuttering problem.
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    Jan 28, 2012 2:16 AM GMT
    I know two people who stutter regularly and they're both highly intelligent and creative, very successful in their professions.

    Stuttering and saying "uhm" often are very different patterns.
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    Jan 28, 2012 2:39 PM GMT
    Usually tied to anxiety and therapy can help. Eh, I have a coworker who stutters and I just wait for him to complete his thoughts and we move on. To me, its not a big deal, then again I have never had this problem so I don't know what it " feels like".
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    Jan 28, 2012 2:57 PM GMT
    I dont stutter as much as I used to, except if I am really nervous, and I am happy that I got that far. What was worse was a speech impediment that I went to therapy for when I was younger. Practicing saying like "the lady lays low by the river" kept it from sounding like cripky off of big bang theory: "da wady ways woe by da wivah"
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    Jan 28, 2012 4:39 PM GMT
    Scotticus saidMy mom will stutter from time to time, dwelling on some beginning sounds of a word on occasion (w-w-w-w-w-when, s-s-s-s-s-s-Saturday). She's had it her entire life, and it's heartbreaking because it's clearly damaged her confidence being around other people and made her very self-aware. icon_sad.gif

    Interestingly, neither my brother nor I developed any stuttering problems.


    I have that problem on the phone or if I get agitated. I have a great aversion to speaking on the telephone because of it. (nor do I necessarily perceive tone properly.

    Much easier in person, and I rarely stutter now unless agitated. I also use those work-arounds that make me sound methodical and careful (where actually i'm trying not to stumble over my words ) icon_wink.gif

    It frustrates more than embarasses me. but I try to not put myself into positions where it may come out.


    working through meetings is really methodical, and the language is automatic; doing interviews causes me more anxiety.

    I'm getting a better relationship with the people in the media so I am more relaxed since I began to trust the interviewers not to choose footage of me stammering or stuttering. They are not cruel. They just want the story. And the more I relax the less i stammer. If i screw up a sentence I can just stop say nothing for a moment then say it again as a separate sentence, confident that is what they will most likely use.

    As a result any fear I ever had that i would soundworse on tv than inperson was quite the opposite. On TV the audience hears only my best takes (only I don;t get to pick it. hee)

    So I can focus on content of what i am saying without worrying about my fluency.


    I am most likely to stutter at home.
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    Jan 28, 2012 5:14 PM GMT
    My ex-brother-in-law had the worst stutter I've ever heard. It could be so bad that he'd begin gasping for breath, like he was having an asthma attack. A word could literally take between 15-30 seconds to get out, which is an eternity when you're the listener.

    I was told he was seeing specialists, and the best thing was to pretend to ignore it, and not say anything about it. Despite having developed a stutter myself some 8 years earlier at age 19, due to my worst motorcycle accident, and thinking maybe I had some experiences to share with him. But nothing ever came of it.

    I cured mine myself, or maybe I should say time and the Army did, which I joined about 8 months after the accident. It wasn't clear if my stutter was neurological, since I also had stroke-like symptoms from the head injuries, or whether it was more related to PTSD because of the horrible nature of the accident. But I believe late-onset stuttering is less common than the kind that first appears in childhood.

    The technique I think most helped me was learning to recognize when a stutter was about to happen, or had just begun. Then to immediately stop trying to speak, turning the moment into a deliberate pause, as if I had intended it all along. I'd look my listeners in the eye, sometimes with a smile, to suggest I knew what I was doing, not in the throes of a stutter.

    Then I'd sorta "regroup" and speak the word. But I found that if I tried to force the stutter to correct itself while it was happening, I'd keep repeating it like a broken record (for those who know what that means).

    It was the totally disengaging and taking a pause that saved me. And to this day I still use deliberate pauses when I speak publicly, and my speech is notably free of "ummms" and "ahhhs" as a result, too, and I no longer stutter.
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    Jan 28, 2012 5:34 PM GMT
    Hey stuttering's cool, I don't care who you are. I stutter, so therefore, it's awesome...duh.
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    Jan 28, 2012 8:47 PM GMT
    I have a speech problem that's kind of similar to stuttering. It's actually kind of bizarre and I should probably look into it to see if it's not the beginning of some degenerative neurological problem. Anyway, when I speak there are certain words I can't say. I'll basically be talking and certain words, like numbers, will come out like "Sixhuablereggghhh". At which point the person I'm talking to will be like wtf what? Then I'll try saying the number again but I either won't be able to AT ALL (I'll just stare at them silently because I'm trying to send the message from my brain to my mouth to say the number but I won't be able to) or I'll have to say it reaaallly slooooowwwwllly. And even then it sometimes won't work. It happens with a lot of random words too, not just numbers.

    Just typing this out now kind of concerns me...
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    Jan 28, 2012 8:58 PM GMT
    A surprising number of my male relatives have speech impediments. Two of my cousins stuttered; 3 other close relatives just struggle with certain vowels and consonant combinations. Anyway, the stutterers seemed to overcome it in time although I wonder if they just acquired better coping skills as they got older. A speech therapist commented to me that speech impediments usually affect boys more than girls and often run in families so I can well believe that.

    When I was a kid I used to just wait for my cousin to finish whatever he was trying to say. I think it bothered him more than me to be honest which probably made it worse. He rarely stutters now though.
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    Jan 28, 2012 9:21 PM GMT
    Definitely tied to anxiety in some people (me).

    It has been an issue in my life.
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    Jan 28, 2012 10:08 PM GMT
    my bf stutters, specially when he is upset..............I always make fun of him
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    Jan 28, 2012 10:13 PM GMT
    charlitos saidmy bf stutters, specially when he is upset..............I always make fun of him


    icon_lol.gif

    I'm sure you make up for it in other ways........
  • a303guy

    Posts: 829

    Jan 28, 2012 10:28 PM GMT
    turbobilly said
    charlitos saidmy bf stutters, specially when he is upset..............I always make fun of him


    icon_lol.gif

    I'm sure you make up for it in other ways........


    Lets hope so. When i person who stutters is made fun of, it can make matters worse....
  • a303guy

    Posts: 829

    Jan 28, 2012 10:33 PM GMT
    Ariodante saidI have a speech problem that's kind of similar to stuttering. It's actually kind of bizarre and I should probably look into it to see if it's not the beginning of some degenerative neurological problem. Anyway, when I speak there are certain words I can't say. I'll basically be talking and certain words, like numbers, will come out like "Sixhuablereggghhh". At which point the person I'm talking to will be like wtf what? Then I'll try saying the number again but I either won't be able to AT ALL (I'll just stare at them silently because I'm trying to send the message from my brain to my mouth to say the number but I won't be able to) or I'll have to say it reaaallly slooooowwwwllly. And even then it sometimes won't work. It happens with a lot of random words too, not just numbers.

    Just typing this out now kind of concerns me...


    I can understand your concern, and yes, seeking out the guidance of a speech pathologist would be a good move. What I'm wondering, purely from the one-dimensional way I 'know' you (just from reading your posts here on RJ) is that since you speak several different languages (at least I think you do) that you may get yourself into occasional internal thought process conflicts where some words in whatever language you are speaking at the moment come naturally, and some words (possibly in the same sentence) still require you to do a bit of internal translation, which slows the speech process down. Since your typing on here is pretty much flawless, that's my armchair, totally unqualified, non-expert opinion. icon_smile.gif
  • Import

    Posts: 7193

    Jan 28, 2012 10:34 PM GMT
    charlitos saidmy bf stutters, specially when he is upset..............I always make fun of him



    awwwwwww