Workout Adjustments for people with HIV/AIDS?

  • JMS0818

    Posts: 1

    Jul 27, 2007 10:53 PM GMT
    Are there any suggestions that this esteem body might offer on adjustments to a strengthening and building workout that a person that's positive needs to make?

    Also, I'm not sure of the exact term but one of the problems I see is the protease paunch around the stomach. It's apparently a result of some medications that cause a thickening of fat around the stomach area. Are there any exercises that can help prevent, reduce the effect of, or rewind the effect once it's started?

    Thanks...
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    Oct 02, 2007 5:05 PM GMT
    Hi guys

    I am also interested in this topic, and wonder what can be done through exercise, or if any other meds are available that do not help to create this side effect.

    Surely someone must know!!

    Steve
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    Oct 18, 2007 4:19 AM GMT
    Running or doing any other strenuous cardio activity has been proven to increase the longevity of life (for hiv ppl or not). Cardiovascular exercise does provide the body with a surge of hormones that also help regulate body systems and try to clean out anything foreign.

    Cardio exercise has also been proven to provoke the hormone that induces the production of white blood cells (i forgot the name). Those infected with hiv, have lower killer T cells (one of the many types of WBC's), which are almost impossible to increase in number, however through exercise and a proper and regular diet, they can be maintained.

    So those infected with HIV are strongly suggested to follow regular cardiovascular activity. You can do weight lifting as well, but be sure to do cardio, as the health benefits are so numerous. And also, the cardio will help prevent the excess fat that may be deposited. If you're really wanting to get rid of fat around the stomach, do cardio activity, as well as abdominal exercises.

    If you're looking to gain muscle mass and feel that cardio will limit you're gains, do very short bouts of cardio (example; 3 fast pass runs of 10 min each). Be sure to eat properly and you should be alright
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    Oct 18, 2007 5:07 PM GMT
    Thank you Zsocerstar for your advice, I have been working out every day now since April. I usually run for 30 minutes. I also do some bench pressing and crunches but is the cardio that I find the most beneficial.
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    Dec 27, 2007 3:50 PM GMT
    But I also have a question, What if the meds that ppl like that are taking affect them to being too Dizzy to be able to run in the morning time? Or the fact that if they have to be at work every morning at 7:30 a.m. Does that affect them as well?
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    Jan 06, 2008 5:56 AM GMT
    zsocerstar saidRunning or doing any other strenuous cardio activity has been proven to increase the longevity of life (for hiv ppl or not). Cardiovascular exercise does provide the body with a surge of hormones that also help regulate body systems and try to clean out anything foreign.

    Cardio exercise has also been proven to provoke the hormone that induces the production of white blood cells (i forgot the name). Those infected with hiv, have lower killer T cells (one of the many types of WBC's), which are almost impossible to increase in number, however through exercise and a proper and regular diet, they can be maintained.

    So those infected with HIV are strongly suggested to follow regular cardiovascular activity. You can do weight lifting as well, but be sure to do cardio, as the health benefits are so numerous. And also, the cardio will help prevent the excess fat that may be deposited. If you're really wanting to get rid of fat around the stomach, do cardio activity, as well as abdominal exercises.

    If you're looking to gain muscle mass and feel that cardio will limit you're gains, do very short bouts of cardio (example; 3 fast pass runs of 10 min each). Be sure to eat properly and you should be alright


    I was also told that cardiovascular activity oxygenates the blood. The HIV virus is destroyed by an oxygen rich environment. It is too bad those hyperbaric oxygen chambers wont work as the HIV is too deep into the tissues.
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    Jan 06, 2008 6:01 AM GMT
    I work out hard, jog 25 minutes 3 times a week and climb a ladder approx 200 times a day for work so it is possible through cardiovascular activity combined with a healthy diet. Incorporate lower ab work into your routine as it pulls the stomach tighter giving an appearance of less paunch. I do 5 sets of 15 weighted leg lifts every other day. This works great. I know the above activity is a little extreme but I am saying it is possible. Take care and good luck. U can do iticon_smile.gif Then again a little belly is cute anyway.
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    Jan 06, 2008 6:52 AM GMT
    I've been positive for over 9 years and my personal experience is that you should keep working out and maintain a reasonably healthy diet. I've never been sick, and never been on meds. In fact I don't even remember having any sero-conversion symptoms. My cd4 fluctuates between 500 and 800. And with the exception of the occasional spike around 45,000, my viral load hovers between 10,000 and 20,000.

    When I chart my counts over the years against my work out logs I find that the harder I've been working out the better my counts have been. It might be just coincidence, but I really think staying active has helped keep me healthy and off meds all this time.
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    Oct 24, 2008 8:00 PM GMT
    I TOTALLY AGREE I HAVE BEEN CHARTING MY NUMBER FOR 7 YRS AND IT GOES HAND AND HAND WORKING OUT REALLY HELPS MY BODY , I TO HAVE NEVER BEEN ON MEDS
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    Oct 24, 2008 8:14 PM GMT
    Could someone explain something to me that I've always been curious about? How can you have HIV and not need to take meds? Do people only take the meds when it turns into AIDS?
  • cowboyathlete

    Posts: 1346

    Oct 24, 2008 8:20 PM GMT
    RBY71 saidI've been positive for over 9 years and my personal experience is that you should keep working out and maintain a reasonably healthy diet. I've never been sick, and never been on meds. In fact I don't even remember having any sero-conversion symptoms. My cd4 fluctuates between 500 and 800. And with the exception of the occasional spike around 45,000, my viral load hovers between 10,000 and 20,000.

    When I chart my counts over the years against my work out logs I find that the harder I've been working out the better my counts have been. It might be just coincidence, but I really think staying active has helped keep me healthy and off meds all this time.
    You sound much like me, except three and a half years here. My asthma and allergies give me more fits than anything. If anything, I have gained muscle weight this year and my waistline has shrunk a bit (Wrangler cowboy cut jeans were made for my a**). icon_biggrin.gif
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Oct 29, 2008 7:29 AM GMT
    Strength Training Burns More Fat Than Endurance Exercise in HIV...

    http://www.aidsmeds.com/articles/hiv_exercise_lipodystrophy_1667_15425.shtml

    fairly recent article...thought it might help folks adjust accordingly...

    - David icon_wink.gif
  • Hagan_F

    Posts: 210

    Nov 07, 2008 3:49 AM GMT
    muscles4muscles saidCould someone explain something to me that I've always been curious about? How can you have HIV and not need to take meds? Do people only take the meds when it turns into AIDS?


    Muscle, very good question. Generally, most people start taking meds when their CD4 count falls below 300 and seems to be staying there. That is the conventional medical wisdom (normal range is 500+ and AIDS is diagnosed when they fall to at or below 200). Viral load isn't as important of a number to follow. If one has a relatively healthy immune system then again, conventional medical wisdom is to wait to begin immunotherapy. Hope that helps.
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    Feb 25, 2009 4:27 PM GMT
    Does anyone else have the problem of weigh redistribution from arms to stomach, because of being on the cocktail?

    Any workout suggestions for weight gain for the arms is appreciated...
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    Feb 26, 2009 1:22 AM GMT
    Thanks, Hagan. That does clear it up but leads me to another question. Once someone begins on the medication do they then have to stay on the medication the rest of their life? Or can they quit taking the medicine after their CD4 count rises again?
  • fitdude62

    Posts: 294

    Feb 26, 2009 1:56 AM GMT
    Muscle4muscle,

    Once you begin a med program you are on it for life.....as of this point anyway....There are some that may change the regimen depending on how the virus is acting with the meds.

    I have to second the fact that if you are poz you must workout. I have tracked my numbers for the last six years and it shows that when I am the most active the numbers are the lowest. My last test was the best ever and I have been doing intense workouts almost every day. The next lowest they ever were was when I was training for a 250 mile bike ride.

    I still do not take meds and my hope is that I will never have to.
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    Mar 10, 2009 5:17 PM GMT
    muscles4muscles saidCould someone explain something to me that I've always been curious about? How can you have HIV and not need to take meds? Do people only take the meds when it turns into AIDS?


    I am not the end all and be all of knowledge but I am HIV poz. A doctor decides to keep you off meds or put you on meds ( once you are on its permanent) by measuring two things : 1. CD4 count ( This isthe white cells that help fight disease ) and 2. your viral count.

    They decided based on if your cd4 count is too low or your viral count is too high or a combination of the two.

    A normal person's cd4 count is about 500 or more per liter of blood. In the 80's when the epidemic hit, people who were dying had a cd 4 count of less than 100 usually in the 50 or below range.

    Doctor's will usually keep you off meds if your CD4 count is in the normal range. That is close to 500 . So you can be HIV+ and have never taken meds.

    Once your CD4 starts dropping, They start considering meds(again, once you go on meds, you can never get off them). For my doctor the magic number for him was 250 for the cd4 count. I went about a year and a half after knowing I was HIV+ without meds ( I was prbably HIV+ and had a normal CD4 count for longer than that depending on false negatives and the accuracy of hiv test at the time) .

    I hope this helps.