Big Salad

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    Jan 29, 2012 1:07 PM GMT
    Every Sunday I make a big salad for the week filled with all kinds of stuff, put it into a Tupperware container, and eat it during the week with dinner. The first thing I do is put the romaine lettuce, carrots, cucumbers, green peppers and broccoli in a large container with one capful of clorox and two or three gallons of water, soak everything for ten minutes, and of course rinse everything well, then dry. This removes bacteria, parasites, and fungus. When I told a friend about this, he thought I was nuts! I thought everyone pretty much did this when you brought veggies and fruit home from the store. By the way, I do the same when I purchase lemon, oranges, etc. Does anyone else do this?
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    Jan 29, 2012 1:27 PM GMT
    A capful of clorox? No, no one does this....icon_confused.gif
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    Jan 29, 2012 1:32 PM GMT
    Fuckkkkkkk why

    Use vegetable wash dude!
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    Jan 29, 2012 1:33 PM GMT
    not bleach, it turns into a carcinogen in the ground H2O. i wash my fruits/veggies with vinegar instead.
  • zackmorrisfan...

    Posts: 300

    Jan 29, 2012 2:14 PM GMT
    DO NOT use bleach. NaOCl interacts with organic compounds in the fruits and vegetables to form carcinogens. You can find information on this topic at the CDC website. Use a vegetable wash specifically made for sanitizing veggies or a white vinegar and water solution.
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    Jan 29, 2012 2:29 PM GMT
    Cancery!!
  • zackmorrisfan...

    Posts: 300

    Jan 29, 2012 2:29 PM GMT
    http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/basics/index.html
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    Jan 29, 2012 3:38 PM GMT
    Yeah I would probably never come to your house for dinner again.

    Or better yet, I'd come over and steal all your bleach.

    Don't do that. What everyone else said about cancer and such.
  • 1man

    Posts: 140

    Jan 29, 2012 3:50 PM GMT
    usebwhite vinegar
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    Jan 29, 2012 4:00 PM GMT
    Buddyboy938 saidEvery Sunday I make a big salad for the week filled with all kinds of stuff, put it into a Tupperware container, and eat it during the week with dinner. The first thing I do is put the romaine lettuce, carrots, cucumbers, green peppers and broccoli in a large container with one capful of clorox

    SCREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEECH!!!!!
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    Jan 29, 2012 5:07 PM GMT
    Hey, here's something I found. I'm not totally nuts:

    "When I followed the fat flush plan, the author recommended Clorox (the name brand) to use as a wash for fruits, vegetables, meats. I forget the exact measurement, but I think I used like a capful of bleach (small amount) to a sink of water. It is recommended by the government to people abroad.

    Here's the recipe:

    A Clorox bath is most effective and inexpensive for removing bacteria, parasites, pesticides and other contaminants from food. Add a teaspoon of Clorox to one gallon (3.785 litres) of water. Soak leafy vegetables and thin-skinned fruit (berries, plums, peaches, etc.) for 15 minutes; root, thick-skinned or fibrous vegetables and thick-skinned fruits (oranges, bananas, apples) and poultry, fish and eggs for 20 minutes.
    Frozen meats (not ground meat) can be thawed in a Clorox bath for about 20 minutes for up to five pounds (2.267 kilograms) of frozen meat. Remove the foods from the Clorox bath, place them in clear water for 10 minutes, and rinse. Dry all foods thoroughly and store. Warning: use only Clorox, and no other brand of bleach, since it does not contain any chlorine."

    I wouldn't use it for meat though, yuck. Maybe I'll use Nutribiotics GSE for a veggie wash and see how that works.
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    Jan 29, 2012 5:29 PM GMT
    Buddyboy938 saidHey, here's something I found. I'm not totally nuts:

    "When I followed the fat flush plan, the author recommended Clorox (the name brand) to use as a wash for fruits, vegetables, meats. I forget the exact measurement, but I think I used like a capful of bleach (small amount) to a sink of water. It is recommended by the government to people abroad.

    Here's the recipe:

    A Clorox bath is most effective and inexpensive for removing bacteria, parasites, pesticides and other contaminants from food. Add a teaspoon of Clorox to one gallon (3.785 litres) of water. Soak leafy vegetables and thin-skinned fruit (berries, plums, peaches, etc.) for 15 minutes; root, thick-skinned or fibrous vegetables and thick-skinned fruits (oranges, bananas, apples) and poultry, fish and eggs for 20 minutes.
    Frozen meats (not ground meat) can be thawed in a Clorox bath for about 20 minutes for up to five pounds (2.267 kilograms) of frozen meat. Remove the foods from the Clorox bath, place them in clear water for 10 minutes, and rinse. Dry all foods thoroughly and store. Warning: use only Clorox, and no other brand of bleach, since it does not contain any chlorine."

    I wouldn't use it for meat though, yuck. Maybe I'll use Nutribiotics GSE for a veggie wash and see how that works.



    This also brings up the actual benefits/harm of leaving naturally occurring bacteria in the foods we eat. I saw something on the news about how sanitizers may actually be lowering out immune response when faced with new strains of bacteria and viruses. Not that I'm a slob or against other's good personal hygiene.

    The truth is I only have myself to go off to support my moderate approach to germ warfare. See, growing up with my maternal Mexican/American grandparents, I didn't see a US Certified doctors. I saw a Mexican doctor when I had cold symptoms as a kid a several times. I didn't have a physical done til I joined track and field in my high school senior year. Painful! I had a really good immune system, but exposed myself to so many filthy and dirty things growing up. Hell my psychopathic grandmother was a hoarder!!

    I wash my fruits and vegetables before cooking and eating too, but aside from vinegar/water rinse I can't see the long term logistical reason of lowering your body's familiarity with the germs that are out in the world? I don't get sick that often, despite not having the insurance to cover seeing a doctor for the 3rd year in a row now.
  • tuffguyndc

    Posts: 4437

    Jan 29, 2012 5:34 PM GMT
    Buddyboy938 saidEvery Sunday I make a big salad for the week filled with all kinds of stuff, put it into a Tupperware container, and eat it during the week with dinner. The first thing I do is put the romaine lettuce, carrots, cucumbers, green peppers and broccoli in a large container with one capful of clorox and two or three gallons of water, soak everything for ten minutes, and of course rinse everything well, then dry. This removes bacteria, parasites, and fungus. When I told a friend about this, he thought I was nuts! I thought everyone pretty much did this when you brought veggies and fruit home from the store. By the way, I do the same when I purchase lemon, oranges, etc. Does anyone else do this?
    i think you maybe on your own with that buddy. they do have better ways or products you can use to clean your produce.
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    Jan 29, 2012 5:36 PM GMT
    ehm, I thought that was why I put lemon, honey and vinegar into the dressing... (all bug-killers)
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    Jan 29, 2012 6:09 PM GMT
    Eh, it's best not to store chopped up vegetables for long periods.

    Yes, every one does use the capful of bleach in a sink full of ice water method (on whole vegetables and fruits). It's call hydrocooling and it's done on all produce as the first step when it leaves the field. (Except tiny hobby farms, but you have to accept a few deaths as part of the cost of politically correct food.)

    Yes, it's hypothetically possible to generate chlorinated organics, some of which might be carcinogenic, from reacting bleach with organics in an acidic environment. These are very easy to detect at vanishingly small concentrations. But really, they're insignificant compared to the amount of carcinogens and anti-carcinogens naturally found in foods.

    Consumer "vegetable wash" products are useless crap.

    Adding vinegar is a bad idea. Unless you're going for an all-out pickling effect. It might lower the pH of surface films, which could inhibit growth of filamentous fungi and some fermentative bacteria, but overall it will increase the numbers of bacteria, and since it's volatile, they'll be all over your refrigerator. (In season, I do usually keep some sliced cukes & onions floating in a cold strong vinegar solution, as snacks. With a tight lid on it.)

    To reiterate, it's best not to store chopped up vegetables for long periods.
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    Jan 29, 2012 8:16 PM GMT
    Just wash it in H2O and go organic.
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    Jan 29, 2012 8:37 PM GMT
    wtf?

    I wash all my food in sulphuric acid and arsenic.
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    Jan 29, 2012 8:39 PM GMT
    Dude, why are you so deadset on putting clorox on your veggies? Use water and vinegar!!!!
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    Jan 29, 2012 8:45 PM GMT
    I don't even wash my veggies lol
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    Jan 29, 2012 8:46 PM GMT
    It sounds a little OCD to me. I just wash veg and salad under the cold water tap, if they're dirty.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jan 29, 2012 8:58 PM GMT
    what's a salad? is it a hat? it's a hat, right?
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    Jan 29, 2012 9:02 PM GMT
    what the fuck!
    noooo dude no lol
    like others have mentioned just use water and rub them well. Dry them off before you cut them up and store them.
    But if you're dead set on using a cleaning agent use vinegar...
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    Jan 29, 2012 9:09 PM GMT
    oh anddd...

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    Jan 29, 2012 9:23 PM GMT
    I love the Seinfeld big salad episode!
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    Jan 29, 2012 9:23 PM GMT
    Time to toss!