How Doctors Die...

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    Jan 29, 2012 5:06 PM GMT
    http://zocalopublicsquare.org/thepublicsquare/2011/11/30/how-doctors-die/read/nexus/
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    Jan 29, 2012 7:06 PM GMT
    It's an interesting article, but not very factual.

    CPR can be performed quite correctly without necessitating the breaking of ribs, as an example.

    My Father-in-law, Bill's Dad, was a very well known Doctor and had brain cancer. He went for all the treatments, which gave him a huge surge in quality of life that lasted several months, his decline after that was gradual and that gave him lots of time to spend with his large family, which is what he loved (as opposed to 'Torch' who didn't, other than pills and had about 4 months).

    Doctors are as individual as well, anyone else. icon_wink.gif
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    Feb 23, 2012 12:01 AM GMT
    This article is filled with speculation. Did not enjoy reading it at all.

    Also ribs always breaking when CPR is performed correctly? Simply not true and the author is supposed to be an MD? Biggest fail.

    I am not afraid of dying, yet still would fight hard to stay alive. I owe it to myself, but to others as well.

    NO CODE tattoo is not valid in my opinion, because you could have changed your mind since getting the tattoo, yet didn't have the money to laser it. I believe getting a NO CODE tattoo is really stupid.
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    Feb 23, 2012 2:22 AM GMT
    Ribs and the sternum (usually only fractures) often do break in CPR, regardless of the physical condition of the person.

    Since an older person with weaker bones is more likely to have cardiac arrest than a younger person, there are usually several ribs broken. Ribs are not important when brain death is possible.

    The point of CPR is to develop enough tension with enough force in the chest cavity to get the heart to move blood through body. You saw the survival rate- <5% for arresting out of hospital. I think it's around 18% of arrests in-hospital. <7% of survivors are able to return to normal neural function. We now use mild hypothermia to slightly decrease neural damage.

    Do Not Resuscitate orders need to be certified. A tatoo and/or verbal agreements are not legally binding. Family members can overrule certified DNR orders. Effective communication between physicians and patients and family members is necessary.

    Sometimes, if the person is judged to have a poor quality of life and family wants to do "everything" to save Grandpa and can't be convinced otherwise, a "slow code" is used. The ethical and moral obligations of such decisions are troubling.

    Chest compressions are a good exercise though.
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    Feb 23, 2012 11:56 AM GMT
    carmi said...Family members can overrule certified DNR orders.....


    Did you mean to write "can not overrule"?

    edit:

    found this

    http://www.mmhospital.org/?id=146&sid=1
    Can anyone else override my wishes about CPR?

    No. You have the right to make your own decisions about your health care.


    from an Ohio hospital but found other sites in other states saying can be overruled.

    Is this state by state? Very surprised to learn a DNR can ever be overruled.