Studio headphones

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2012 4:59 AM GMT
    I need a set of over the ear headphones that I'll be using for audio recording/editing. Should I just go with Beats, or is there something better/less expensive?
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    Feb 03, 2012 5:35 AM GMT
    Beats are aren't a very good value. If you want something that sounds good and is affordable, look into Sennheiser or Audio Technica or Sony.
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    Feb 03, 2012 7:18 AM GMT
    I've had my beats since they first came out. *love them* but mainly because of their bass emphasis.

    Not sure if that's what you want for studio work.
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    Feb 03, 2012 7:24 AM GMT
    RobertF64 saidI've had my beats since they first came out. *love them* but mainly because of their bass emphasis.

    Not sure if that's what you want for studio work.


    I'm pretty sure it's exactly the opposite of what's needed in a studio.
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    Feb 03, 2012 7:30 AM GMT
    In the studio, if you're doing engineering, you need something that produces sound accurately. Beats Audio does not do that. Check these out:

    http://www.etymotic.com/ephp/er4.html

    They are incredible.
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    Feb 03, 2012 8:06 AM GMT
    Beats headphones are the worst pair I've ever tried. The bass is deep, but it's muffled. The overall sound is just muffled.

    I have a pair of Klipsch that sound amazing. I still am amazed at the aural quality of these headphones. They're not quite studio-caliber, but they're just one step below that. So I can't even imagine what their studio headphones sound like.

    You should go to cnet.com to compare. Great reviews, and, based on years of using this site, the reviews are pretty much spot-on.

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    Feb 03, 2012 12:10 PM GMT
    purelife01 saidIn the studio, if you're doing engineering, you need something that produces sound accurately. Beats Audio does not do that. Check these out:

    http://www.etymotic.com/ephp/er4.html

    They are incredible.


    Cool headphones!

    Althogh they only have a frequency response of 20hz-16khz and i would be concerned over the loss of upper hamronics there... Wouldn't wanna mix for many hours on in-ear headphones either, but that just my preference of course

    I'm actually looking for some good studio headphone at the moment too. Sennheiser is a good brand, but i've also been looking at Beyer Dynamics (I happen to have a very good student discount there icon_biggrin.gif)

    http://europe.beyerdynamic.com/shop/hah/headphones-and-headsets/studio-and-stage/studio-headphones.html

    If you're gonna use them for mixing, maybe the 880 PRO would do the job.

    And if it's more for recording artists and musicians, I would recommend the 770 M's for instance.

    I have tried all three of the 770, 880 and 990's. they all feel good on your ears (covers whole) with a light, still firm pressure that feels like it won't bother you after a few hours..

    they also have a frequency response of 5hz - 35khz, to compare to the other ones up there...


    EDIT: Note that both the 880 and 990's are open and semi-open headphones which of course makes them NOT suitable for recording artists!

    EDIT 2: oh yeah, don't use Beats for this type of work. While they may sounds good for listening to music, they will lie to you in a studio environment.
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    Feb 03, 2012 12:14 PM GMT

    I wear Beyers and Senneheisers at work, and they are both good quality... depends what you need them for really... but you can't go wrong with either manufacturer... skip the Beats.

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    Feb 03, 2012 12:15 PM GMT
    [quote]


    EDIT: Note that both the 880 and 990's are open and semi-open headphones which of course makes them NOT suitable for recording artists![/quote]

    yeah, and don't get open or semi-open if you need full coverage...
  • Beeftastic

    Posts: 1747

    Feb 03, 2012 8:53 PM GMT
    Headphones are a very personal choice, every persons ears are different. There is a difference between studio headphones and consumer headphones. Studio headphones are made to isolate you from your surroundings somewhat, and provide a very neutral almost dry sound. They will usually have very clear highs. This is so you can really hear what is going on with your mix. They are also made to be comfortable for long stretches. Consumer headphones are usually not that clear, have enhanced bass, and are geared to make the sound pleasant and more laid back in some ways. Most people listening casually will probably choose a consumer headphone every time. Pro headphones just sound less forgiving and more challenging.

    Another thing to watch out for, is to avoid any headphone that has active/electronic noise cancellation technology. These change the sound of the music too much, applying electronic equalization and sound leveling you don't want when you are mixing.

    Calling a headphone "Studio" really means nothing, it's just a marketing term that is very over-used in consumer headphones.

    The Beats are really made for consumers, not the studio, despite what the advertising says. They are too colored and don't allow the fine details of your mix to come out. Beats tend to be bass heavy, and do weird things with imaging, and lose detail in the highs. Beats tend to be extremely overpriced for their performance, you can almost always find a better headphone for about 1/2 what they cost. However, I really like the Beats Pro, one day I want to find a pair used (though I would never mix with it).

    One thing to keep in mind, if you get a headphone with enhanced bass (like a Beats) your mixes will actually probably turn out sounding thin and anemic, because your ear will be compensating for the headphones bassiness. Which is probably what you don't want.

    I would suggest looking at Beyer-Dynamics, or maybe Sony as some people have suggested.

    One headphone that is used A LOT in studios for pop, rock, electronica etc. is the Audio-Technica ATH-M50. It's a great headphone that is the best of both worlds in that it has great bass, and good highs, but still works good for mixing. It's very inexpensive for it's quality. It will run rings around most consumer headphones and wipe the floor with any of the Beats. So you will enjoy a headphone that is great for listening for fun, but also a serious tool for mixing. You can get them for about $150. One thing about them is that they fit pretty snug around the ears, so that they isolate well. Some people don't like that. They are very efficient which means they play loudly and clearly even connected to an iPhone.

    413ESTIuwwL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

    http://www.amazon.com/Audio-Technica-ATHM50S-Professional-Monitor-Headphones/dp/B004ZG9TMA/ref=pd_vtp_e_1