Panic Attacks

  • TheIStrat

    Posts: 777

    Feb 05, 2012 5:08 AM GMT
    I've been having them a lot recently. Does anyone have any tips for dealing with them when they rear their ugly heads?

    Thank you in advance icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 05, 2012 5:09 AM GMT
    TheIStrat saidI've been having them a lot recently. Does anyone have any tips for dealing with them when they rear their ugly heads?

    Thank you in advance icon_smile.gif



    What are your triggers?
  • TheIStrat

    Posts: 777

    Feb 05, 2012 5:11 AM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    TheIStrat saidI've been having them a lot recently. Does anyone have any tips for dealing with them when they rear their ugly heads?

    Thank you in advance icon_smile.gif



    What are your triggers?


    Being in a room full of people. Tonight I was at a very crowded bar and I couldn't handle it.
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    Feb 05, 2012 5:13 AM GMT
    TheIStrat said
    Scruffypup said
    TheIStrat saidI've been having them a lot recently. Does anyone have any tips for dealing with them when they rear their ugly heads?

    Thank you in advance icon_smile.gif



    What are your triggers?


    Being in a room full of people. Tonight I was at a very crowded bar and I couldn't handle it.



    What's the maximum number of people you're comfortable around?
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    Feb 05, 2012 5:14 AM GMT
    When I first got them I thought I was having a heart attack. After my med friend told me it was panic attacks I almost immediately cognitively repaired myself by simply shrugging them off. I don't know if this works for everyone, but the second I get that bizarre rush of what feels like epinephrines into my heart I simply think to myself, "stupid abundance of neurotransmitters go dissipate" and I calm down immediately. Before I would think "OH MY GOD WHAT THE FUCK IS THIS SHIT I'M GONNA DIE" which just circulated and released more excitatory neurotransmitters making me feel even more like I was going to die.
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    Feb 05, 2012 5:15 AM GMT
    JakeBenson saidWhen I first got them I thought I was having a heart attack. After my med friend told me it was panic attacks I almost immediately cognitively repaired myself by simply shrugging them off. I don't know if this works for everyone, but the second I get that bizarre rush of what feels like epinephrines into my heart I simply think to myself, "stupid abundance of neurotransmitters go dissipate" and I calm down immediately. Before I would think "OH MY GOD WHAT THE FUCK IS THIS SHIT I'M GONNA DIE" which just circulated and released more excitatory neurotransmitters making me feel even more like I was going to die.



    Unfortunately, that doesn't work for most people with panic attacks. In fact, they can be extremely difficult to overcome (for most people.)
  • TheIStrat

    Posts: 777

    Feb 05, 2012 5:19 AM GMT
    I didn't used to have them. But the past year, Good Lord. It's embarrassing.

    I guess I should talk to a professional.
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    Feb 05, 2012 5:21 AM GMT
    TheIStrat saidI guess I should talk to a professional.
    Yes. A psychiatrist will be able to prescribe medication that will help you stay calm.
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    Feb 05, 2012 5:27 AM GMT
    TheIStrat saidI didn't used to have them. But the past year, Good Lord. It's embarrassing.

    I guess I should talk to a professional.



    Yes, but make sure you ask them how much experience they have in treating panic disorder. I've found a lot of therapists don't know as much about it as you would think.
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    Feb 05, 2012 5:30 AM GMT
    I can tell you this.....leaving the room is the worst thing you can do. Your brain is already falsely convinced there is danger when there isn't. Leaving the situation only confirms to yourself that fleeing is the answer. Once you start reinforcing your fears by running, they will become more and more intense.
  • TheIStrat

    Posts: 777

    Feb 05, 2012 5:31 AM GMT
    Scruffypup saidI can tell you this.....leaving the room is the worst thing you can do. Your brain is already falsely convinced there is danger when there isn't. Leaving the situation only confirms to yourself that fleeing is the answer. Once you start reinforcing your fears by running, they will become more and more intense.


    I'll remember this next time. Thanks icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 05, 2012 5:33 AM GMT
    Long ago I discovered panic attacks. I was 20. lol,
    I met a man that I just lusted and loved after on top of that (my panic attacks), though it wasn't reciprocated other than living together and having sex, not making love. Other than that, it was like rooming with someone you worked with at the office.

    I managed in spite of the panic attacks that were frequent and that began long before I met him.

    Now this part is for you Thelstrat, my Thelstrat.

    One afternoon, rainy and heavy, I was on a crowded bus going through East Vancouver. The bus was a trolley, so powered by overhead lines via connecting poles from the bus roof. They came off the track at an intersection. The lights flickered, died, came back, casting shadows across the faces of everyone there. I experienced a surge of panic so powerful I decided I'd likely die or fall foaming and convulsing to the bus floor.
    Then I just gave up. 'OK, I've had it." I thought, "Go ahead Doug."

    I waited.
    5 minutes, each second like a nail dragging across glass.
    Nothing happened. People talked. Someone opened a window.
    10 minutes. I fidgeted, waiting. Slowly, I realized nothing was going to happen but my feelings of panic. I abruptly imagined panic as people in an audience, jumping up and down saying, "Look at ME. Look at ME."

    For me, after two years of thinking and considering this, I decided panic was just a feeling, like a surge of anger, or love, or humility, or foolishness, or cleverness. It was just unfamiliar.


    This is just my personal revelation and how I navigated through it and out the other side. For each person it's different, and hopefully more will share their stories. I wish this for you, to discover your own internal compass and come through well.

    warmly, with a hug or so,

    -Doug

  • TheIStrat

    Posts: 777

    Feb 05, 2012 5:36 AM GMT
    meninlove said Long ago I discovered panic attacks. I was 20. lol,
    I met a man that I just lusted and loved after on top of that (my panic attacks), though it wasn't reciprocated other than living together and having sex, not making love. Other than that, it was like rooming with someone you worked with at the office.

    I managed in spite of the panic attacks that were frequent and that began long before I met him.

    Now this part is for you Thelstrat, my Thelstrat.

    One afternoon, rainy and heavy, I was on a crowded bus going through East Vancouver. The bus was a trolley, so powered by overhead lines via connecting poles from the bus roof. They came off the track at an intersection. The lights flickered, died, came back, casting shadows across the faces of everyone there. I experienced a surge of panic so powerful I decided I'd likely die or fall foaming and convulsing to the bus floor.
    Then I just gave up. 'OK, I've had it." I thought, "Go ahead Doug."

    I waited.
    5 minutes, each second like a nail dragging across glass.
    Nothing happened. People talked. Someone opened a window.
    10 minutes. I fidgeted, waiting. Slowly, I realized nothing was going to happen but my feelings of panic. I abruptly imagined panic as people in an audience, jumping up and down saying, "Look at ME. Look at ME."

    For me, after two years of thinking and considering this, I decided panic was just a feeling, like a surge of anger, or love, or humility, or foolishness, or cleverness. It was just unfamiliar.


    This is just my personal revelation and how I navigated through it and out the other side. For each person it's different, and hopefully more will share their stories. I wish this for you, to discover your own internal compass and come through well.

    warmly, with a hug or so,

    -Doug



    I liked that. I know its all silly when its happening. I just can't quite completely convince myself when its happening that its all in my head and nothing bad is going to happen. Not yet, at least. Its just when im in social situation like that I suddenly revert to when I was in grade school/high school and people pointed and laughed at me and I'm still bracing for it to happen again, though it hasn't in like, what, 8 years? It's all very silly now that I'm home and not in the thick of it.
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    Feb 05, 2012 5:42 AM GMT
    Give yourself time, my young Jedi.

    Feelings are feelings. It's up to us which ones have power over us.
    Meds can help, but may also not be necessary, depending on what you try and if it works or not.
    This is just my humble attempt to offer something to try.

    lol, hey it worked for me.

    *more warm hugs and a brief back rub with that*

    -Doug
  • TheIStrat

    Posts: 777

    Feb 05, 2012 5:43 AM GMT
    meninlove said

    *more warm hugs and a brief back rub with that*

    -Doug



    PURRRRRR
  • araphael

    Posts: 1148

    Feb 05, 2012 8:35 AM GMT
    Panic attacks usually have deep roots in other childhood issues. But regardless of that, now and days with our advancements in medicine, medicology often offers the best remedies.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Feb 05, 2012 8:39 AM GMT
    My doctor prescribed Clonazepam, a mild tranquilizer.
    I take half a tablet, in the morning and half a tablet before I go to bed.
    It controlled my panic/anxiety attacks, immediately.
    For me, it was a miracle.



  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Feb 05, 2012 8:44 AM GMT
    Scruffypup saidI can tell you this.....leaving the room is the worst thing you can do. Your brain is already falsely convinced there is danger when there isn't. Leaving the situation only confirms to yourself that fleeing is the answer. Once you start reinforcing your fears by running, they will become more and more intense.



    I am going out on a limb and assuming that you've never had a panic attack.

    My panic/anxiety attacks would sweep over me whenever I would enter a store.
    What was I supposed to do, stand there until I fainted, threw up, or shit my pants ?
    For me, medication was the answer.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Feb 05, 2012 8:48 AM GMT
    TheIStrat saidI didn't used to have them. But the past year, Good Lord. It's embarrassing.

    I guess I should talk to a professional.



    For almost my entire life, I didn't have them.
    They just suddenly started happening, for no apparent reason.
    Don't be embarrassed.
    Go to your doctor (general practitioner/primary care physician) and get a prescription for Clonazepam (a mild tranquilizer).
    I haven't had a panic attack since I started taking it.
    Incredible relief.
  • disasterpiece

    Posts: 2991

    Feb 05, 2012 9:00 AM GMT
    I had my first (minor) panic attack when I was 16. I was in bed, trying to sleep, and of course was thinking about this and that. Then, this question randomly came to my mind; a simple question that I had never really thought deeply about before, but that would change my life from that point : what's gonna happen when I'm dead ?

    As an atheist, as a sceptical and logical person, I see life after death the same way as it was before birth : just not being. Not thinking, not remembering, not rationalizing, simply not existing anymore and for ever again. But those are just details.

    At the moment this idea of dissapearing and losing everything I know, I lived through and I am, I felt like I lost my breathe, a deep, deep dizziness. Now, it passed, and after that, I was in a kinda existential depression for maybe 6 months, from which I recovered.

    BUT ! Since then, every now and then, I innocently go to bed, and start thinking about that. I know it's coming, and even if I try to stop thinking about it, and coming to this point where I take conscience of the eventual (and possibly/relatively imminent) end of my existence and my absolute impotence against it, I have a panic attack, and everytime it gets worst.

    Last time I had it, I was literally screaming in bed, I stood up and started punching violently my pillow, struggling to catch my breath. And then it stops. I stop thinking about it, because after all, there's nothing I can do about it. I laugh at the absurdity of what just happened, and I go back to sleep.

    The good, or bad thing, about those panic attacks is that I'm always alone when it happens (since I've always been single). I wonder how it's gonna be when my boyfriend wakes up in the middle of the night because I'm jumping and punching in the bed, screaming like a childless mother... icon_confused.gif
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    Feb 05, 2012 1:36 PM GMT
    Webster666 said
    Scruffypup saidI can tell you this.....leaving the room is the worst thing you can do. Your brain is already falsely convinced there is danger when there isn't. Leaving the situation only confirms to yourself that fleeing is the answer. Once you start reinforcing your fears by running, they will become more and more intense.



    I am going out on a limb and assuming that you've never had a panic attack.

    My panic/anxiety attacks would sweep over me whenever I would enter a store.
    What was I supposed to do, stand there until I fainted, threw up, or shit my pants ?
    For me, medication was the answer.




    You would be DEAD WRONG. In fact, my panic disorder became so bad that I actually became agoraphobic due to my avoidance of things that might trigger an attack. If I had a panic attack on a bridge, I would avoid bridges. If I had one on an elevator....no more elevators. I had the worst attack on a plane, so I never flew again. Soon my world became so small I could barely go a block from my home without triggering one. Then a doctor gave me Valium to take whenever I felt one coming on. This is the WORST thing anyone could have done for me. No, I didn't become addicted to them. Being someone who doesn't like feeling drugged, I would just break small pieces off and put them under my tongue. My backpack with my Valium in it became my "safety." It was like a ball and chain that had to follow me everywhere, which made me feel even more like something was horribly wrong with me. I would find myself away from home and start second guessing myself and dig into my backpack to make absolutely sure they were in there. Those little pills easily doubled my anxiety. Eventually they would turn to pink dust and I'd have to order more. Not until I met a therapist who specialized in panic disorder did I get any real relief. Getting me to leave those damn pills behind was the first part of my therapy. And yes, as horrible as it might sound, staying in the place where you're having the attack is the surest cure for panic. Your brain is treating a benign situation like it's life threatening, and forcing yourself out of "fight or flight" is how you rewire your brain.
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    Feb 05, 2012 1:44 PM GMT
    Narcotics.
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    Feb 05, 2012 1:44 PM GMT
    Disasterpiece saidI had my first (minor) panic attack when I was 16. I was in bed, trying to sleep, and of course was thinking about this and that. Then, this question randomly came to my mind; a simple question that I had never really thought deeply about before, but that would change my life from that point : what's gonna happen when I'm dead ?

    As an atheist, as a sceptical and logical person, I see life after death the same way as it was before birth : just not being. Not thinking, not remembering, not rationalizing, simply not existing anymore and for ever again. But those are just details.

    At the moment this idea of dissapearing and losing everything I know, I lived through and I am, I felt like I lost my breathe, a deep, deep dizziness. Now, it passed, and after that, I was in a kinda existential depression for maybe 6 months, from which I recovered.

    BUT ! Since then, every now and then, I innocently go to bed, and start thinking about that. I know it's coming, and even if I try to stop thinking about it, and coming to this point where I take conscience of the eventual (and possibly/relatively imminent) end of my existence and my absolute impotence against it, I have a panic attack, and everytime it gets worst.

    Last time I had it, I was literally screaming in bed, I stood up and started punching violently my pillow, struggling to catch my breath. And then it stops. I stop thinking about it, because after all, there's nothing I can do about it. I laugh at the absurdity of what just happened, and I go back to sleep.

    The good, or bad thing, about those panic attacks is that I'm always alone when it happens (since I've always been single). I wonder how it's gonna be when my boyfriend wakes up in the middle of the night because I'm jumping and punching in the bed, screaming like a childless mother... icon_confused.gif



    Why not just accept the fact that you have no way of knowing what happens after death instead of pretending that you do know? Maybe it's time to ask yourself why you're holding onto the label of "Atheist." I find that when you stop trying to know the answer to everything, life in general becomes a lot easier. Just a suggestion.
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    Feb 05, 2012 1:51 PM GMT
    ive had 2 major panic attacks wheere i thought i was having a heart attach and I actualy made someone sleep near me in case something happened. but what triggers mine is caffeine, not regular caffeine, but super caffeine in workot drinks. So i got rid of those and I've ben better icon_smile.gif think about something you may have done before u got panic attacks.

    First panic attach i was on the go all day loading up on coffee in the morning diet soda all day and then some unsweet tea and then another starbux frapp. Then at the store I just felt like I was going to explode.

    2nd panic attack was at the movie theatre but earlier that day i was at the gym and drank an intense pre workout energy thing.

    So thats my thing
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    Feb 05, 2012 1:52 PM GMT
    When you die you turn into an insect and come back. I read it in this book about buddhism or something.

    Might have been on Youtube.